Rationales (Bakersfield)

Rationales tell us why we think and behave the way we do.
Rationales that are widely shared provide opportunities for uniting diverse groups, and rationales that are segregated provide fewer opportunities to unite diverse groups. We discuss the segregated rationales elsewhere; here we discuss the four top rationales: Education , Poverty, Housing, and Public Safety.

Education

Neighborhood A - Low Income

* “An educated community is a viable community –quality of life is greatly improved”.

Neighborhood B - Mixed Income

* "Test scores are rising slightly. The police and schools seem to be enforcing the truancy laws more often, the drop-out rate is slowly decreasing."

Neighborhood C - Middle Income

* "A student’s education is the platform for the rest of their life. There are many barriers to teaching students properly in Kern County – Poverty, Drugs, Gangs, Parental Neglect."

Neighborhood D - Upper Income

* "Kern County has fallen far behind in basic education skills as compared to other counties in California. This is evident from our StateTest Scores, our drop-out rate and the under-educated job force within the county."

Poverty

Neighborhood A - Low Income

* "The cost of housing for rent or purchase keeps the working poor people trapped in a viscious cycle of poverty and helplessness."

Neighborhood B - Mixed Income

* There are limited resources for the low-income and non-insured. The number of these people in Kern County is extremely high. Healthcare for everyone is essential in creating a strong community – healthy people add more to the economy.

Neighborhood C - Middle Income

* "Demographically speaking we are poorer than Appalachia – education level the same – everything stems from that. To kick start education and other activities, people have to be secure in their economic well-being. If a family is struggling to put a meal on the table, they do not have time to think about education or other matters."

Neighborhood D - Upper Income

* "Economics is the key to life. Life is a big crap sandwich, the more bread you get, the less crap you have to eat."

Housing

Neighborhood A - Low Income

* "The cost of housing for rent or purchase keeps the working poor people trapped in a viscious cycle of poverty and helplessness."

Neighborhood B - Mixed Income

* "Builders make more money when they build expensive homes; there is more profit in that. "

Neighborhood C - Middle Income

* "Stable housing is the key to family and economic stability.
Families need housing which is affordable to them, so that they can maintain a stable household, and raise their children without working multiple jobs; and so they can maintain their residence without moving their children from place to place. Poor housing also raises health problems for families."

Neighborhood D - Upper Income

* "Families in crisis (burned out, etc); it is very hard for them to get back in adequete housing because of price escalation. Too much density in housing (multiple families in one unit, etc) overtaxes the property and can lead to crime and violence."

Public Safety

Neighborhood A - Low Income

* "Public Safety experts know that gangs are a problem in our community. How to address the problem has been the sticking point. The New Task Force will be working closely with police, sheriff, neighborhood leaders, faith-based leaders and gang members themselves to begin to address the problem. "

Neighborhood B - Mixed Income

* "Public safety is one of the most important things a community must address before tackling other areas of public life such as education, health, civic participation, etc. "

Neighborhood C - Middle Income

* "We want to attract others to Bakersfield. Gangs affect us all. People won’t want to live here."

Neighborhood D - Upper Income

* "Nothing else we do is going to make much sense if people feel unsafe and insecure . . . It is important that one part of the community considers another part “dangerous” because that divides the community"

 

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