Blain Roberts

Associate ProfessorProfessor Blain Roberts


Office: Social Sciences 118

Email: broberts@csufresno.edu

Office phone: 278-8677

Education:
PhD - University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
MA - University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
M. Litt. - University of St. Andrews
BA - Princeton University

 

Research/Teaching Interests:

20th Century U.S.; U.S. Women's History; U.S. Cultural History; the American South; Memory

Select Publications:

Books:

Pageants, Parlors, and Pretty Women: Race and Beauty in the Twentieth-Century South, to be published by the University of North Carolina Press in March 2014

Struggling with Slavery in the Cradle of the Confederacy: Memory and the "Peculiar Institution" in Charleston, South Carolina. Book manuscript under revision for publication [co-authored with Ethan J. Kytle]

Articles and Book Chapters: 

"Uncovering the Confederacy of the Mind, Or How I Became a Belle of the Ball in Denmark Vesey's Church," Southern Cultures 19 (Fall 2013): 6-25.

"Looking the Thing in the Face: Slavery, Race, and the Commemorative Landscape of Race in Charleston, South Carolina, 1865-2010," Journal of Southern History 78 (August 2012): 639-684. [co-authored with Ethan J. Kytle]

"'Is It Okay to Talk about Slaves?': Segregating the Past in Historic Charleston," in Karen L. Cox, ed., Destination Dixie: Tourism and Southern History (University Press of Florida, 2012). [co-authored with Ethan J. Kytle] 

"A New Cure for Brightleaf Tobacco: The Origins of the Tobacco Queen during the Great Depression, Southern Cultures 12 (Summer 2006): 30-52. 

Op-ed essays for the New York Times and the History News Network.

Courses Offered:

Undergraduate
U.S History, 1877 to the Present
U.S. Women's History
U.S. Cultural History, 1877 to the Present
History and Women's Autobiography
Advanced Historical Research and Writing

Post-baccalaureate
Introduction to Graduate Writing and Historiography
The Civil Rights Movement

Work in Progress:

 I am currently co-writing a book with my colleague Ethan J. Kytle on the memory of slavery in Charleston, South Carolina, from the end of the Civil War to the present.