Standard 12: Preparation to Teach English Learners

Through planned prerequisites and/or professional preparation, the teacher preparation program ensures the following: 

Candidates learn thepurposes, goals, and content of the adopted instructional program for the effective teaching and support of English learners; and candidates understand the local and school organizational structures and resources designed to meet English learner students’ needs. 

Candidates learn about state and federal legal requirements for the placement and instruction of English learners, and ethical obligations for teaching English learners. 

Candidates are provided with multiple, systematic opportunities to demonstrate knowledge and application of pedagogical theories, principles, and practices for (a) English Language Development leading to comprehensive literacy in English; and (b) for the development of academic language, comprehension and knowledge in the subjects of the curriculum, making grade-appropriate or advanced curriculum content comprehensible to English learners.

Candidates learn how to implement an instructional program that facilitates English language acquisition and development byeffectively using materials, methods, and strategiesso that studentsacquire listening, speaking, reading and writing skillsin English in order to progress to the grade level reading/language arts program for English speakers. 

Candidates have opportunities to acquire knowledge of linguistic development, first and second language acquisition, and how first language literacy connects to second language development.

Candidates acquire and demonstrate the ability to use initial, formative, and summative assessment information to diagnose students’ language abilities, and to develop lessons that promote students’ access to and achievement in the state-adopted academic content standards. 

Candidates learn how cognitive, pedagogical, and individual factors affect students’ language acquisition. 

Candidates acquire skills for managing and organizing a classroom with first- and second-language learners.

Candidates acquire skills to collaborate with specialists and paraprofessionals.

Candidates learn and understand the importance of students’ family and cultural backgrounds and experiences in planning instruction and supporting student learning. Candidates communicate effectively with parents and families.

Candidates learn how to differentiate instruction based upon their students’ primary language and proficiency levels in English, and considering the students’ culture, level of acculturation, and prior schooling.

Intern Program Delivery Model:

In pre-service, teacher preparation programs provide candidates with a knowledge of and ability to teach English learners, including but not limited to Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) methodology, language acquisition and English Language Development (ELD).

All candidates when taking LEE 154 Content Language and Literacy Instruction have multiple systematic opportunities to acquire the knowledge, skills and abilities to deliver comprehensive instruction to English learners.  The use of visuals, realia, gestures, multiple examples, vocabulary development activities, and adapted instruction are emphasized. Candidates must demonstrate knowledge and application of pedagogical theory, principles and practices for English language development in lessons planned and implemented in the classroom which must be available to them when enrolled in this course. Candidates are taught to implement an instructional program that facilitates English language acquisition and development through the use of SDAIE and ELD strategies. Candidates are taught to utilize assessment information to diagnose students’ language abilities, and to develop lessons that promote students’ access to and achievement of the state adopted academic content standards.  Candidates also learn how cognitive, pedagogical and individual factors affect students’ language and literacy acquisition.

School- Based Structures that Meet EL Needs.

Candidates in LEE 154 Content Area Language and Literacy Instruction learn about the various school based organizational structures designed to meet the needs of English  learners. These include courses such as ELD, SDAIE, Structured English Immersion, Pull out programs, Submersion, Immersion, etc. They also learn about these programs first hand in their field experience. [See LEE 154 syllabus.]

Laws impacting ELs.

Candidates in the language and literacy course (LEE 154) examine the most fundamental national and state legal mandates that impact how English learners are placed in school programs and which instructional programs best meet their needs. CI 151 Social Foundations of Education also examines laws related to English learners. [See LEE 154 and CI 151 syllabi.]

Methods and Strategies for ELD.

The presentation of language learning theory and literacy development in LEE 154 Content Area Language and Literacy Instruction always includes specific statements and examples for working with English learners. This course is grounded on the principle that every effective content area lesson is also a successful language development lesson. Candidates examine methods and strategies that promote rapid English language acquisition. These include social interaction, the balance between teacher centered and student centered learning, cooperative learning, etc. Candidates in this course go away with an effective set of teaching strategies to use with their content materials so that they can continually support and challenge their students’ learning. This course also prepares candidates to assess their students’ levels of English proficiency so that they can, in turn, design and deliver more effective instruction. 

Making advanced curriculum content comprehensible to ELs.

Candidates taking the language and literacy course (LEE 154) learn Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) techniques applicable to their content areas. In doing so they are reminded that students need to be constantly challenged. In other words, content must be made comprehensible without minimizing its content or lowering students’ expectations.

Laws impacting ELs.

Candidates in the language and literacy course (LEE 154) examine the most fundamental national and state legal mandates that impact how English learners are placed in school programs and which instructional programs best meet their needs. CI 151 Social Foundations of Education also examines laws related to English learners. [See  syllabi for LEE 154 and CI 151.]

First and second language aquisition.

Candidates learn to appreciate the fact that the more literate anyone is in the first language the faster they will acquire the second. Candidates examine basic theories of first and second language acquisition including crucial concepts like Basic Interpersonal Communicative Skills (BICS); Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP); and Common Underlying Proficiency (CUP) in LEE 154 (the language and literacy course). [ See syllabus for LEE 154.]

Using assessment information to diagnose language abilities and to guide instruction.

Candidates in the language and literacy course (LEE 154) learn to interpret the results of the California English Language Development Test. Candidates also learn how to use evaluation journals to monitor progress and assess language development and content knowledge learning. In LEE 154 and the general and subject-specific methodology courses ( CI 159 and CI 161) they learn how to use alternative assessment methods to fairly assess English learners. [ See LEE 154 and CI 159 syllabi.]

Classrooms for first- and second-language learners.

In LEE 154 candidates learn thatstudents need to be organized in such a way that questions are answered and concepts being learned are clarified and at the same time language development occurs. Successful configurations include, one-to-one tutoring; partner systems; community paraprofessionals; etc. Within the classroom various learning strategies promote English language development such as collaborative groups, jig-sawing, cooperative learning structures, and other types of social interaction leading to effective learning.  Candidates student teach in one of the most linguistically rich areas of the U.S. [ See LEE 154 syllabus.]

Differentiating instruction based on proficiency and background.

Differentiating instruction based on proficiency is discussed in LEE 154.

The importance of family and cultural background is discussed in the social foundation course (CI 151). [ See LEE 154 and CI 151 syllabi.]

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