Category A: Program Design, Governance, and Qualities

Standard 1: Program Design

The preliminary teacher preparation program and its prerequisites include a purposeful, interrelated, developmentally-designed sequence of coursework and field experiences, as well as a planned process for comprehensive assessment of candidates that effectively prepare candidates to teach all K-12 students and to understand the contemporary conditions of schooling, including attention to California public education.

The sequenced design of the program is based on a clearly stated rationale that has a sound theoretical and scholarly foundation anchored to the knowledge base of teacher education and informed by adult learning theory and research. 

By design, the program provides extensive opportunities for candidates  (a) to learn to teach the content of the state adopted K-12 academic content standards to all students; to use state-adopted instructional materials, to assess student progress, and to apply these understandings in teaching K-12 students; (b) to know and understand the foundations of education and the functions of schools in society; and (c) to develop pedagogical competence utilizing a variety of strategies as defined by the Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs) (provided in the appendix). 

A fair, valid, and reliable assessment of the candidate’s status with respect to the TPEs is embedded in the program design.

Program Design

The preparation of candidates at CSUF begins with the General Education Program. The goal of the General Education Program is to develop and strengthen basic skills, scholarship, disciplined thinking, awareness, reflection and integration of knowledge. The 51 units of course work in the General Education Program are divided into four types of courses: foundation, breadth, integration, and multicultural/international courses.

Foundation courses focus on “fundamental skills and knowledge." Breadth courses expose students to a variety of disciplines within a structured framework that develops knowledge in four basic areas of human endeavor: (1) the physical universe and its life forms; (2) the arts and humanities; (3) social, political, and economic institutions and behavior, and their historical backgrounds; and (4) lifelong understanding and self-development. Integration courses provide an integrative experience at the upper division level. Multicultural/international courses prepare students for an international, multicultural world. (See pages 89–92 from the General Catalog.)

Students then complete an academic major related to the subject in which they plan to be credentialed; for example, a student working toward a credential in social science typically majors in history.  Students also take additional course work related to the teaching field beyond requirements for a major to complete their subject matter preparation.

For admission to the Single Subject Credential Program, students must meet a number of requirements. These requirements include an early supervised field experience designed (1) to ensure that a student understands the role of a public school teacher, (2) has had pre-professional experiences with linguistically and culturally diverse youth, and (3) is making an informed choice about entering the teacher preparation program.

Once admitted, our students complete 33 units of course work and fieldwork. More specifically, this consists of six professional education courses and two semesters of student teaching. The first semester of student teaching is a part-time, developmental experience that carries four units of credit.  The second semester of student teaching is full-time and carries ten units of credit. The following chart illustrates the overall design of the preparation program for Single Subject candidates.

Preparation Program for Single Subject Credential for Students Beginning Credential Program in Fall 2010/Spring 2011

  • General education (51 units)
  • Foundation
  • Breadth
  • Integration
  • Multicultural/international

Major requirements (30-77 units) +

Additional courses +

Preadmission field

 

required for subject matter preparation(Units vary by subject)

experience(3 units or 45 clock hours)

 

Preliminary Credential Program

 

 

Semester One:

Five professional education courses(14 units) +

Initial student teaching(4 units)

Semester Two:

One professional education course(5 units) +

Final student teaching(10 units)

 

Preliminary Credential Course Requirements

 

Units

CI 151

Social Foundations of Education

3

CI 152

Educational Psychology

3

CI 159

Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary Schools

3

CI 161

Methods and Materials in Secondary Teaching

3

SPED 121

Teaching Students with Special Needs in the Secondary General Education Setting

2

EHD 155A

Student Teaching in Secondary School

4

EHD 155B

Student Teaching in Secondary School

10

LEE 154

Content Area Language and Literacy for Secondary Learners

5

Total

 

33

 

Two-Semester Schedule

Semester One

Semester Two

CI 151

CI 161 (if not taken previously)

CI 152

LEE 154 (if not taken previously)

CI 159

EHD 155B

CI 161 (if available) or LEE 154

 

SPED 121

 

EHD 155A

 

Program Rationale

Both course work and field experiences in the Single Subject Credential Program are designed to produce graduates who are prepared to provide leadership for a diverse society. Course work makes students more knowledgeable about issues associated with the increasing rate of change, diversity and technological complexity of American society. The program of study prepares students to be change agents, to work effectively with a diverse student population and to embrace technology as both an important tool and topic of instruction. Special attention is paid to the economic, cultural, and linguistic diversity that characterizes our service area.

The program offers two courses in the foundations of education. The course in the social foundations of education includes a focus on the purposes and conditions of public education in the United States, with a special emphasis on schooling in California [see CI 151 syllabus]. The course in the psychological foundations of education examines the principles of human learning and their implications for the classroom [see CI 152syllabus].

The program also requires four methods courses. Together, these courses teach candidates about the state adopted content standards and instructional materials, [see CI 161 syllabus], teaching strategies, and methods of assessment [see CI 161, CI 159, LEE154, and SPED 121 syllabi].

In addition to a prerequisite field experience, the program itself gives candidates two semester-long field experiences, initial student teaching (EHD 155A) and final student teaching (EHD 155B). These field experiences allow candidates to apply their understanding of standards, instructional materials, teaching strategies and assessment in the teaching of K-12 students in carefully selected single subject settings.  The student teaching takes place in settings that are representative of the diversity of American society, and California in particular. Candidates gain experience working with economically, ethnically, and linguistically diverse populations and with students who have special needs. The program continually seeks input from the education community to insure that the curriculum is revised as needed so that program graduates are prepared to meet the changing needs of today’s secondary schools. The knowledge base for our program is described in the following section.

Knowledge Base for Single Subject Program 2010

Social, Historical, and Philosophical Foundations

The faculty believes that teachers need a broad understanding of the multiple purposes American public schools are expected to serve in our democratic, diverse, technologically advanced, and rapidly changing society. Students must view these expectations for public schools from an historical perspective and gain an understanding of the ongoing debate regarding school purposes and functions. (Adler, 1982; Butts, 1988; Dewey, 1916; Feinberg & Soltis, 2004; Goodlad & McMannon, 1997; Hirsch, 1987; Kohlberg, 1975; Lickona, 1993). Also basic to fulfilling the role of a teacher in today’s schools is a thorough understanding of issues surrounding the concept of equality of educational opportunity and of the relation between school outcomes and gender, class, race, and ethnicity (AAUW, 1999; Allport, 1958; Banks, 2001, 1993; Coleman, 1968; Freire, 1968, Gardner, 1995; 1985; Bowles & Gintis, 1976; Giroux, 1991; Jencks, 1972; Kozol, 1991; Maher & Ward, 2002;  Sadker & Sadker, 1994).  In addition, students need to understand contemporary school reform issues in their historical and sociological context (Adler, 1982; Chubb, 1990; CA High School Task Force, 1992; Natl. Comm. on Excellence in Educ., 1985; Noddings, 1992; Ravitch, 2000).

Theories of Human Develoment and Learning

Students are introduced to a variety of developmental and learning theories including those of the behaviorists, the developmental psychologists, and the cognitive psychologists (Ausubel, 1978; Bandura, 1986; Bigge & Shermis, 2004; Flavel, 1987; Gagné, 1985; Gilligan, 1982; Kazdin, 2001; Marzano, 2003; Miltenberger, 2001; Piaget, 1969, 1978; Skinner, 1978; Vygotsky, 1978, 1987). These theories of learning and development provide, in part, a basis for teaching instructional principles related to cognition, learning, intelligence, creativity, motivation, classroom management, and evaluation (Barell, 1991; Bloom, 1968; Brophy, 1983; Canter & Canter, 2002; Cohen, 1987; Gagne & Driscoll, 1992; Gardner, 1983, 1991; Lightbrown & Spada, 1993; Marzano, 2003; Maslow, 1954; Murphy & Alexander, 2000; Perkins & Borden, 2003; Resnick & Klopfer, 1989; Slavin, 1995; Stiggins, 1994; Stipek, 2002; Webb, 1982; Wiggins, 1993). Constructivism provides a basis for viewing learners as individuals who construct meaning in personal ways, structure and restructure their experiences in light of their current cognitive frameworks, and gradually modify their thinking through active and developmental processes. Recognizing that students construct meanings in many ways, the faculty models a wide variety of effective instructional approaches and encourages students to consider how various instructional practices interact with their individual learning styles. (Black & Ammon, 1992; Brooks & Brooks, 1993; McCarthy, 1997; Slavin, 1995; Swisher & Schoorman, 2001; Wheatly, 1991).

Established and Contemporary Research

Beyond the research summarized in the previous two sections on sociological factors that affect schooling, and the human development and learning literature, additional research on the development of teachers constitutes an important part of the knowledge base for the program.  (Bullough, 1989; Darling-Hammond, 1996; Finn, Pannazzo, & Achilles, 2003; Fullen & Hargreaves, 1992; Good, 1990; Gunter, Estes, & Schwab, 2003; Orlich, 2004; Shulman, 1987, 2004).  An effective teacher education program must provide a systematic means for acquiring teaching skills and must promote reflection and analysis of teaching. Reflection is defined by Richardson-Koehler (1987) as the degree to which a teacher provides articulate analysis of his or her own teaching. John Dewey (1904) maintained that preparing student teachers to think about their work is more important than teaching them specifics and methods of classroom management, although classroom management is recognized as an important teaching skill within the program (Marzano & Marzano, 2003; Boyton & Boyton, 2005). Grant and Zeichner (1984) state that reflective teaching occurs when teachers question and clarify why they chose specific classroom methods, procedures and content. Glickman (1980) writes that student teachers grow through developmental stages and supervision should help move students from what they are to what they can be, teachers who are reflective thinkers, effective collaborators, and lifelong learners.  The faculty supports students in thinking analytically about goals, actions, environments and outcomes in using this analysis to improve future thinking. Opportunities to reflect are woven throughout the program in course assignments and in our locally designed Fresno Assessment of Student Teachers (FAST), our system of Teacher Performance Assessments (TPAs).

Experienced-based Principles of Effective Practice

Instruction concerning each aspect of the teaching process (planning, implementing, evaluating, reflecting, and revising) is informed by and consistent with current principles of effective teaching as described in the literature (Intrator, 2004; Berliner & Rosenshine, 1987; Good & Brophy, 1987; Schön, 1983; Shulman, 1987a, 1987b, 1992) and is confirmed by the expert opinion of exemplary teachers serving on various program advisory committees. For example, students learn about the importance of “over-planning,” the value in appealing to multiple learning modalities, the benefits of cooperative learning activities, the power of “hands-on” instruction and the efficiencies of authentic assessment (Pierce & O’Malley, 1991; Stiggins, 1994; Wiggins, 1993).   The faculty’s desire to incorporate experienced-based principles of effective practice is attested to by the frequent use of case studies and teacher interviews in coursework and the emphasis on clinical supervision of fieldwork by practicing teachers.

Emerging Educational Policies and Practices

Program revision based on emerging educational policies and practices is an important feature of the program. Over the past decade a number of program changes have been precipitated by recommendations made in reform reports issued at the national and state levels regarding teacher education (Darling-Hammond, 1996; National Commission on Teaching and America’s Future, 1996; U.S. Department of Education, 1999).  The faculty, of course, makes mandated changes specified in legislation and supporting documents.

The reform reports on p-12 schooling in general, as well as the many curriculum reform proposals for specific subject areas are also an important part of the program’s knowledge base, with selected reports becoming required student reading (Adler, 1982; Chubb, 1989; Goodlad, 1984; CA High Sch. Task Force, 1992; Hirsch, 1987; Middle Grades Task Force, 1987; Nat’l. Comm. on Excellence in Educ., 1983; No Child Left Behind Act of 2001; NCTM, 2000; Sizer, 1985.) Each student also studies the current national and state content standards and state frameworks for his or her subject area.

Multicultural and Global Perspectives

Effective secondary teachers prepare a highly diverse student population to live and work in a multicultural, multilingual society that is part of an increasingly interdependent world. Consequently, their own preparation must focus on why and how to multiculturalize and globalize the curriculum (Banks, 1993, 1994; 2001; Glazer, 1997; Gollnick & Chinn, 1999; Grant & Sleeter, 1996; Hernandez, 1989; and Ogbu, 1992). They must also know how to effectively instruct students who are characterized by ethnic, racial, cultural, and linguistic diversity.  More specifically, students must understand the nature of culture, how culture manifests itself, how teachers can learn about their students’ cultures, and how to engage in culturally responsive pedagogy (Banks, 1995; Brinton, D. et al, 1991; Cal. State Dept. of Edu., 1986, 1990; DeAvila, 1981; Gay, 2000; General Principles, 2003; Heath, 1986; Hillard, 1990; Hirsch, 1987; Ogbu, 1990, 1992).  To be effective teachers of students who are not fully proficient in English, credential candidates need to learn special techniques for delivering content area instruction (August & Hakuta, 1997; Cummins, 1994, 1999; Cummins & Miramontes, 2005; Diaz-Rico & Weed, 1995; Freire & Macedo, 1987; Garcia, 2005; Schisini, 1994).  They also need to know how they, as content area teachers, can help their students gain full proficiency in English (Cummins, 1999; Cummins & Miramontes, 2005; Fillmore, 1985; Genesee, 1999; 1999; Krashen & Terrell, 1983; and Reyes & Molner, 1991).

Incorporation of Technology Knowledge Base

One of the most rapidly expanding areas of the knowledge base for teacher education relates to the use of technology, especially computers, as an educational tool serving a broad array of purposes (Sheingold, 1991; Warschauer, 1996). Our students must learn to use the computer as an instructional tool, a device to help in record keeping, and a powerful research aid. The Internet is rapidly becoming one of the richest sources of curriculum materials available to teachers and we must prepare them to take advantage of the opportunities it provides. Our students must also learn to use technology in thoughtful, student-centered ways, which provide greater access to curriculum for all students (Bohlin, 1997; Morrison, Lowther, & Demeulle, 1998). As technology resources become increasingly available in secondary classrooms, most teachers will be expected not only to use technology knowledgeably, but also to contribute to the technology knowledge and skills of their students as one important goal of p-12 schooling (Mehlinger, 1996; Sherman & Sherman, 2004).

Assessment

Prospective teachers need to understand the important role of assessment in the educational process as well as the misuses of assessment. Candidates learn about assessment from both a technical and a socio-political perspective.  They learn how to construct classroom assessment and how to use the results for the improvement of instruction and other appropriate educational uses.  They also learn how to interpret standardized tests and how to use data from these tests for the benefit of students.  They understand the relationship between standards, instruction, assessment, and accountability.  They understand the political issues surrounding standards and assessment at the state and national levels.  (NCLB (2002); Standards-Based Assessment, 1998; Strong, Silver & Perini, 2001; Designing High Quality Assessment, 1998; Integrating Assessment with Instruction, 1998.)

Adult Learners

The Single Subject Credential Program is designed with the adult learner in mind. Our education faculty members are grounded in learning theory relative to how children and adults learn.  Therefore, our teaching strategies include lectures, small group discussions, cooperative learning exercises, discovery learning, modeling, student presentation, videos, and computer activities.  Faculty members utilize dialogue, participation, and a problem-solving approach to engage adult students and encourage them to take control of their own learning.  Prior knowledge of learners is important with adults as well as children; therefore, faculty model that in our curricula (Brookfield, 1995).  Knowing that adults tend to be concerned with practical application (Knowles, 1980, 1990; Lawler, 1991; Jarvis, 1995), faculty tie theory to practice on a regular basis.

Critical reflection and self-awareness are an important aspect of adult learning and are emphasized in our curriculum in course assignments and Teacher Performance Assessments. This supports the reflective process that will be continued in the induction program and supports a lifelong learning process.

Features of Program Design

Coursework and fieldwork are designed to reflect principles of teacher development and are informed by adult learning theory and research.

As described in the knowledge base, the program is designed with principles of teacher development in mind. For example, we recognize that it is natural for new student teachers to focus on how their students perceive them and on their own teaching performance. This is done in several ways. Our psychological and social foundations courses (CI 152 and CI 151), our methods courses (CI 159 and CI 161), our language and literacy course (LEE 154), and our special education course (SPED 121) help candidates to understand the variety of ways in which learners can vary (e.g., learning styles, preferred modalities, and levels of English language development). Our methods courses teach candidates a process of instructional design that uses student assessment results as a key factor in making instructional design decisions. In field experiences, candidates are asked to observe the various assessment strategies employed by teachers and how these teachers use what they learn in planning subsequent instruction. In both initial and final student teaching candidates plan daily lessons and implement assessment strategies. In conferencing with their university supervisors and master teachers, candidates are asked to explain how they are using their assessment results in planning instruction. In our Teaching Sample Project, candidates are evaluated on how they use assessment data that they have obtained concerning their own students’ performance to plan future instruction in their final student teaching assignment.  [See FAST Handbook, instructions for Teaching Sample Project.] We help them move toward a focus on students and student learning as their guide for measuring and improving their performance. Also, the program capitalizes on the tendency of adults to think dialectically, that is, to create meaning by resolving conflict but to realize that no solution is absolute.  We also recognize that mature learners are pragmatic in their thinking, more tolerant of ambiguity and more likely to take into account a variety of considerations, in addition to logic, than are immature learners.

Coursework and fieldwork function cohesively to give candidates an understanding of public schooling in California.

An important unifying goal for both course work and fieldwork is to enable students to meet the Teacher Performance Expectations (TPEs). [See FAST Handbook, Teacher Performance Assessments.] 

Students who complete the program on a full-time basis are engaged in field experiences and course work from the beginning to the end of the program. Master teachers have input into the content of course work and university faculty help shape the nature of field experience. Master teachers frequently serve as guest speakers in classes, and teach course work on a part-time basis. Most faculty members supervise field experiences, and all faculty who teach the subject-specific pedagogy course supervise student teachers on a frequent, if not continuous, basis.

All parties involved with delivering the Single Subject Credential Program are informed about the program goals, the TPEs, and the course work content.  The primary means by which the various parties stay informed include regular program meetings for course instructors and university supervisors, a yearly professional development day for university supervisors and master teachers, and written communications including the Student Teaching and Internship Handbook and the Fast Handbook and periodic letters to master teachers.

The program is designed to ensure that each candidate understands the state-adopted academic content standards for students, learns how to teach the content of the standards to all students, learns to use state-adopted instructional materials, assess student progress in relation to the standards.

The subject matter preparation programs give students the knowledge needed to effectively address the California K-12 content standards and frameworks. In the professional education preparation program, the subject-specific methods courses provide a thorough examination of the California standards and frameworks. [See CI 161 syllabi.)  This course also focuses on subject-specific assessment methods. In addition, the social foundations course (CI 151 Social Foundations of Education) presents an overview of the benefits and possible drawbacks to mandatory state and national standards. [See CI 151 syllabus.]  Students briefly review the California standards in their subject areas in this course.  Finally, the standards and frameworks are used in the general methods course (CI 159 Curriculum and Instruction) as candidates practice writing objectives and developing lesson plans. [See CI 159 syllabus.]

The design of the course work and field experiences gives candidates many opportunities to use a variety of instructional strategies and provides many opportunities for candidates to learn about and practice the Teaching Performance Expectations.

Instructors of the course work in the program model the teaching strategies they expect students to master. For example, language teachers are expected to teach, for the most part, in the target language. This is modeled in the language methods class, which is taught partly in several other languages to demonstrate methods of teaching in a language in which the students are not proficient. Instructional strategies include large group, direct instruction, cooperative small group instruction, reciprocal teaching, modeling, and Web enhanced instruction to name just a few. Each course and field experience contributes in some way to enabling students to achieve the Teacher Performance Expectations (TPEs).    [See TPE Course matrix at the end of this section.]  In initial and final student teaching, students will practice and are evaluated on their success in meeting the TPEs. [ See the FAST assessments in the FAST Manual.]

Coursework and fieldwork prepare candidates for an embedded teaching performance assessment, the FAST. Candidates are provided opportunities to practice tasks similar to those found in the teaching performance assessment.

The matrix at the end of the response to this standard shows where in the program students learn about and practice the Teacher Performance Expectations (TPEs).

The program's embedded system for evaluating candidates on the TPEs is designed to be fair, valid and reliable.

Each candidate is evaluated using the locally designed FAST system. It is made up of four assessments. These assessments are imbedded in EHD 155A and EHD 155B Student Teaching in the Secondary School.  Each candidate must satisfactorily complete these four assessments to be recommended for a credential. Detailed rubrics are used to clarify expectations regarding the rating of each part of each assessment. [See the FAST Manual.]

Individuals who score the assessments are trained and calibrated at least once every two years. During a two-year review cycle, scores on each task are analyzed to ensure fair scoring. Also on a two-year cycle, double scoring is used to determine inter-rater reliability for each assessment.

Teacher Performance Expectations Course Matrix 

TPE

CI

151

CI

152

CI

159

CI

161

SPED

121

LEE

154

EHD

155A

EHD

155B

TPE 1B:  Subject-Specific Pedagogical Skills for Single Subject Teaching

 

 

 

*LPR

FA

 

 

 

 

FA

SA

TPE 2:  Monitoring Student learning During Instruction

 

 

*LPR

LPR

 

 

FASA

SA

TPE 3:  Interpretation and Use of Assessments

 

LPR

LPR

FA

LPR

FA

*LPR

FA

LPR

FA

FA

SA

SA

TPE 4:  Making Content Accessible

 

 

LPR

FA

*LPR

FA

LPR

FA

LPR

FA

FA

SA

SA

TPE5:  Student Engagement

 

 

*LPR

FA

LPR

 

 

FA

SA

SA

TPE 6C:  Developmentally Appropriate Practices in Grades 9-12

 

LPR

*LPR

 

 

 

FA

SA

SA

TPE 7:  Teaching English Learners

 

 

LPR

 

 

*LPR

FA

SA

SA

TPE 8:  Learning about students

LPR

LPR

LPR

LPR

LPR

LPR

FA

SA

SA

TPE 9:  Instructional Planning

 

 

LPR

FA

*LPR

FA

LPR

LPR

FA

SA

SA

TPE 10:  Instructional Time

 

 

LPR

*LPR

 

 

FA

SA

SA

TPE 11:  Social Environment

*LPR

LPR

 

 

 

 

FA

SA

SA

TPE 12:  Professional, Legal, and Ethical Obligations

*LPR

 

 

 

 

 

FA

SA

SA

TPE 13:  Professional Growth

 

 

 

*LPR

 

 

FA

SA

SA

 

LRP

= Opportunity to learn, practice, or reflect

FA

= Formative assessment

SA

= Summative assessment

*

= Course most responsible, if any

Note:  EHD 155A and EHD155B provide opportunities to practice and reflect on all TPEs.

Integrated/Blended Program Delivery Model:

An Integrated/Blended Program of Undergraduate Teacher Preparation provides candidates with:

  • a carefully designed curriculum involving both subject matter and professional preparation that includes integrated and concurrent coursework of subject matter and related pedagogy at gradually more sophisticated levels
  • a clearly developmental emphasis involving early and continuous advising, and early field experiences
  • explicit and supported mechanisms for collaboration among all involved in the design,
  • leadership, and ongoing delivery of the program.

Fresno State has one CTC-approved blended program. This program is in the area of physical education. The design of that program is identical to the one just described except that candidates complete their credential courses over three semesters instead of two and they are permitted to take EHD 50 Introduction to Teaching concurrently with CI 151 Social Foundations of Teaching and CI 152 Educational Psychology as shown below.

Three-Semester Schedule

Semester One
EHD 50
CI 151
CI 152

Semester Two
CI 159
SPED 121
EHD 155A
LEE 154

Semester Three
CI 161
EHD 155B

Intern Program Delivery Model:

The intern program is a partnership between the preparation program and the employing school district. In an intern delivery model, the preparation program integrates theory and practice as appropriate for teachers of record. Each internship program includes a pre-service component (providing skills and knowledge required prior to entering the classroom as the teacher of record) delivered in a sustained, intensive and classroom-focused manner, which includes introductory preparation relative to Standards 4, 7, 8, 11, 12, and 13. The remaining content and fieldwork builds on the pre-service experiences and addresses all Commission-adopted standards. The partners jointly provide intensive supervision that consists of structured guidance and regular ongoing support throughout the program. The program design includes an early completion option.

CSUF also has an approved internship program. The course work is the same as for the regular program but delivered as follows:

COURSE SEQUENCE FOR TEACHER INTERNS

Single Subject Basic Credential Programs

INTERNS MUST MAINTAIN A 3:00 GPA IN ALL BASIC CREDENTIAL COURSES

The following course work is REQUIRED prior to beginning the internship year.

Single Subject

CR

EHD 155A

Initial Student Teaching

4

* SPED 121

Teaching Students with Special Needs in the General Education Setting

2

CI 151

Social Foundations

3

CI 152

Psychological Foundations

3

CI 159

Curriculum & Instruction in Secondary Schools

 

SPED 121 or equivalent is to be completed during internship Semester One (1) or Semester Two (2), if given an EDH 155A Waiver. (See internship staff for details.)

Interns should plan to complete remaining course work during the two semester of their internship year and during winter or summer session if possible, in order to be eligible for a preliminary credential at the end of the internship year.

Single Subject

CR

EHD 155B

Final Student Teaching Internship

5

CI 161

Methods in Content Area

3

EHD 155B

Final Student Teaching Internship

5

LEE 154

Content Area Language and Literacy for Secondary Learners

5

Because Internship training consists of two (2) semesters, interns should plan on the following sequence for field placement:

Single Subject

Teacher Internship course work in semester 1
EHD 155B (5 cr.)

Teacher Internship course work in semester 2
EHD 155B (5 cr.)

Interns are supervised and supported by both a university supervisor and a cooperating teacher assigned by the school.

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