Program Standard 8: Participating in IFSP/IEPs and Post-Secondary Transition Planning

The program provides candidates opportunities to demonstrate the ability to participate effectively as a team member and/or case manager for the IFSP/IEP/transition planning process, from pre-referral interventions and requisite assessment processes, through planning specially designed instruction to support access to the core curriculum, developing appropriate IFSP/IEP/transition planning goals based on standards and following all legal requirements of the IFSP/IEP/transition planning process.

Program Standard 8 Component:

Courses in which the component is addressed:

Participate effectively as a team member and/or case manager for the IFSP/IEP/transition planning process

SPED 219; 171; 172; 175; 176

planning specially designed instruction to support access to the core curriculum

SPED 136; 246; 145; 146; 171; 172; 175; 176

developing appropriate IFSP/IEP/transition planning goals based on standards and following all legal requirements of the IFSP/IEP/transition planning process.

SPED 130; 136; 246; 145; 146; 247; 171; 172; 175; 176

Standard 8 is addressed through the credential programs in the areas of Mild-Moderate and Moderate-Severe disabilities. For example, in SPED 120: Introduction to Special Education, candidates are introduced to the referral, assessment, identification, and IEP development processes via course content and guest speakers. An IEP meeting is viewed and role-played as a class activity. In the School-based Observation and Interview Reflection/Report assignments in SPED 120, candidates have the opportunity to speak with a practicing teacher about these processes. Universal Design for Learning and differentiated instruction are introduced in SPED 120 and candidates are required to complete a project in which they consider the relevancy of the characteristics associated with disability categories in light of these educational practices. This content (UDL, differentiation, and individualized adaptations) is then further explored in SPED 145: Designing Effective Environments for Students with Disabilities. In SPED 145, candidates develop a standards-based instructional unit that adheres to the principles of UDL for a student with a disability. As a part of this assignment (Curricular Access and Adaptations) candidates also use an adaptation decision-making model to provide individualized supports to access the core curriculum. Additionally, content in SPED 145 specifically addresses IEP and IPP planning for transition-age youth in the areas of community-based and vocational goals and supports through class instruction, course resources, online activities, and course assignments.

In SPED 130: Assessing Students with Special Needs, teacher candidates are introduced to assessment instruments and activities in early childhood through chapter reading, a quiz and a lecture and discussions on this topic.

In SPED 136: Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities, through course content and signature assignments, students learn to plan instruction to support access to the core curriculum. Students have the opportunity to teach their unit in their practicum classroom and evaluate their ability to plan and deliver effective, accessible instruction (SPED 171). In SPED 246: Specialized Academic Instruction for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities, teacher candidates develop and write an IEP or IFSP that incorporates legal mandates, state and federal regulations, transition planning, self-determination strategies, coordination of services, and ethical decision-making. Under the guidance and supervision of their Cooperating Teacher, students have the opportunity to participate in the IEP/IFSP process at their practicum site (SPED 175). In addition, teachers learn to design more specialized instruction and apply this knowledge in a Teaching Sample Project.

Content related to Standard 8 is also specifically addressed in SPED 219: Effective Communication and Collaborative Partnerships through the Collaborative Teaming Reflection assignment. In this assignment candidates speak with various members of one student's IEP team in order to determine in what ways the IEP team is functioning effectively and positively, and to develop an action plan in order to address areas which team collaboration to support IEP development and student supports and transitions could be improved.

During initial fieldwork student teacher candidates are required to attend, observe, and reflect on an IEP/ITP meeting. During Practicum teacher candidates are required to participate in the assessment for, development of, meeting for and implementation of IEP/ITPs for students in their setting.Vocational, prevocational or career goals are developed for each IEP. Linked Learning/CareerTech are shared in seminars.Transition and transition planning are also woven into curriculum as it relates to self-determination, student-led IEPS, and transition choices with speakers from the Family Resource Center, local Community College, and other local agencies. Throughout their fieldwork and practicum experiences, students are expected to work closely and collaboratively with their Cooperating Teachers, other personnel, students, and families at their assigned school sites, as well as their supervisors, and to participate in all aspects of the teaching profession. Fieldwork and practicum experiences provide a structured and supportive environment in which students can apply what they've learned in the university classroom to their teaching.

M/S Standard 8: Augmentative and Alternative Communication

Each candidate demonstrates understanding of mandated considerations for augmentative and alternative communication technology for students with moderate/severe disabilities, including students with physical/orthopedic disabilities, other health impairments, deaf/blind and multiple disabilities. Each candidate demonstrates knowledge and application of augmentative and alternative communication systems or devices and services to facilitate communication, improved academic performance, and skill development of students with moderate/severe disabilities, students with physical/orthopedic disabilities, other health impairments, deaf/blind and multiple disabilities.

M/S Standard 8 Component:

Courses in which the component is addressed:

demonstrates understanding of mandated considerations for augmentative and alternative communication technology for students with moderate/severe disabilities, including students with physical/orthopedic disabilities, other health impairments, deaf/blind and multiple disabilities

SPED 247

demonstrates knowledge and application of augmentative and alternative communication systems or devices and services to facilitate communication, improved academic performance, and skill development of students with moderate/severe disabilities, students with physical/orthopedic disabilities, other health impairments, deaf/blind and multiple disabilities

SPED 176

SPED 247: Advanced Environment Design and Instruction for Students with Moderate-Severe Disabilities, addresses the assessment and instructional strategies used to develop individualized and culturally sensitive communication systems and related goals. The focus is on strategies to teach communication skills in natural and meaningful contexts for students with moderate/severe disabilities, including students with physical/orthopedic disabilities, other health impairments, deaf/blind and multiple disabilities. Candidates are taught the ability to select, obtain, use, and adapt use of high/low tech materials and equipment.They are also taught their role in sharing this information with families and training both family members and paraprofessionals. Augmentative and alternative communication systems, as well as other assistive technologies in the classroom are introduced. Specifically, content and resources related to the use of the iPad, iPhone, and iTouch as an augmented communication aide are examined. Webinars by leading researchers in the area of AAC and AT for students who do not rely on verbal communication are used as additional instructional tools. Guest speakers who utilize a range of assistive technologies and augmentative communication supports visit the class to demonstrate the use of technology supports in educational and community environments and to explain how it is funded and the process to obtain needed technology in districts and COEs.Candidates learn how to assess and plan for low and high technology needs of a student with disabilities in a variety of environments; school, home, community, etc.The Communication Project, a signature assignment in SPED 147, requires that candidates assess and attend to individual student characteristics (such as mobility, motor planning, positioning, and sensory characteristics) in order to consider a range of no/low-tech and high-tech augmented communication supports and systems for both academic achievement and independence, across settings and to train either a parent or paraprofessional in the use of the technology determined to be required for the student to benefit.

SPED 172 and SPED 176: Initial and Final Practicum in Moderate-Severe Disabilities, are the fieldwork component of the Moderate-Severe disabilities credential. Both semesters of fieldwork are compromised of structured weekly expectations and activities, as well as the implementation of fieldwork requirements that are connected to content of core methods courses and observed by a university supervisor. An Evaluation Criteria Checklist is introduced in SPED 172 and utilized throughout both semesters of fieldwork to guide candidates in programmatic development and change. Items on the checklist need to be developing and/or in place in order for candidates to exit SPED 176: Final Practicum in Moderate-Severe Disabilities, including those criteria thataddress their ability to determine the type of equipment that best meets the needs of the students and how it should be implemented to support the student to access appropriate curriculum and to become more independent.

The Student Project in SPED 219: Effective Communication and Collaborative Partnerships incorporates an interview with others in order for candidates to understand this perspective on planning for and providing support to a student. It asks for consideration regarding the self-determination, technology related, and communication needs of the student across settings.

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