Program Standard 7: Transition and Transitional Planning

The program provides opportunities for candidates to plan, implement, and evaluate transitional life experiences for students with disabilities across the lifespan. Each candidate collaborates with personnel from other educational and community agencies to plan for successful transitions by students. Each candidate demonstrates the knowledge and ability to teach students appropriate self-determination and expression skills.

Program Standard 7 Component:

Courses in which the component is addressed:

Transition planning across the lifespan

SPED 120; 130; 246; 145; 219

 

Collaborate w/ personnel from other educational & community agencies to plan for successful transitions by students

SPED 120; 130; 246; 146; 247; 219

Knowledge & ability to teach self-determination & expression skills

SPED 120; 146; 247; 219

Transition and transition planning are addressed through both the Mild-Moderate and Moderate-Severe disabilities credentials. Candidates are empowered throughout all credential courses that their perspective on supporting students with disabilities needs to remain broad in order to always consider their student across the lifespan. In SPED 120: Introduction to Special Education, the School-based Observation and Interview Report/Reflection assignments give candidates the first opportunity in the credential program to discuss methods of successful collaboration in the instruction and support of students with disabilities. For this assignment the teacher candidatesask professionals questions related to transition and transition services as are appropriate to the age level (ie preschool to K; middle school to high school; high school to adult program). They share back and reflect on the answers provided. This is also addressed in course content related to collaborative methods of service delivery and consideration of student planning and supports across the lifespan and through the use of guest speakers.

SPED 145: Designing Effective Environments for Students with Disabilities, addresses school-to-work transition, and community-based and vocational supports at the end of the semester. Utilization of guest speakers with disabilities from the local community and documentary videos related to this topic are utilized as instructional tools. Quizzes are used to assess student knowledge in this area.

In SPED 130: Assessing Students with Special Needs, teacher candidates are introduced to assessment instruments and activities in planning, implementation, and evaluation of transitional life experiences for students with disabilities across the lifespan. Specifically in Topic 10 the students have an activity that analyzes a Case Study in a small group discussion format. Utilizing the lecture notes and chapters in the text, they draft a transition assessment plan for the student in a scenario provided. Included in their plan are the areas they believe require assessment and the specific instruments—both formal and informal—that they would employ in their assessment.

In SPED 246: Specialized Academic Instruction for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities, teacher candidates form collaborative teams to research and address transitions for a selected grade level and disability. Each team researches transition practices and community resources. Candidates collaborate and create a multi-media presentation that integrates transition supports, resources, and programs with strategies presented in class/course resources and an activity or lesson to prepare students to transition. Teacher candidates also develop and write an IEP or IFSP that incorporates legal mandates, state and federal regulations, transition planning, self-determination strategies, coordination of services, and ethical decision-making.

Content related to: transition services from 18-22 years of age for students with disabilities, community-based instruction, and community employment and living supports is addressed in SPED 145: Environmental Design for Students with Disabilities. Guest speakers from the local community are also utilized to describe to candidates the lived-experience of those for/with whom transitional planning methods are utilized. This content is formatively assessed via a course quiz administered through Blackboard.

Core methods courses in the Moderate-Severe disabilities credential encourage ongoing consideration of where candidates, as members of educational teams, want their students to be in subsequent years beyond those in their programs. This is especially highlighted in SPED 247: Advanced Environment Design for Students with Moderate-Severe Disabilities, through the ecological assessment and student planning/instruction process for the development of individualized communication systems and supports. The Communication Project requires that candidates solicit the input of multiple team members through the use of ecological assessment tools. Candidates need to consider long-term transitions for their student in the development of individual communication support plans, especially as it related to the transition of AAC supports between schools and in the school-to-work transition.

SPED 219: Effective Communication and Collaborative Partnerships, also specifically addresses Standard 7. Methods of collaboration with a range of education team members (including families, general educators, related service personnel, community/agency personnel, and the student with disabilities, themselves) are covered through course content and a required text in the class. The Collaborative Teaming Reflection assignment requires candidates to reflect on the structure and functioning of one of the collaborative teams they work on, utilizing questions and content in the course text. Other content, such as the person-centered planning philosophy and process, is utilized to support collaboration with students with disabilities across the lifespan. Self-determination is addressed as a key concept in the course. Course time is spent considering classroom practices and structures that can best support the self-determination of students with disabilities. Student-led IEPs are taught as a vehicle through which to support the development of self-determination, and to foster increased with collaboration with students as they transition across the life-span. The Final Student Project requires that candidates: interview one of their students and reflect on the use of strategies that are person-centered and that support the self-determination of this focus student.

M/S Standard 7: Transition and Transitional Planning

In addition to the Common Core Transition and Transitional Planning Standard, each candidate demonstrates knowledge and advocacy skills related to the various transitions experienced by students’ moderate/severe disabilities, including those who are deaf-blind and/or those with additional disabilities, as they move from infancy to adulthood.

M/S Standard 7 Component:

Courses in which the component is addressed:

demonstrates knowledge and advocacy skills related to the various transitions experienced by students’ moderate/severe disabilities, including those who are deaf-blind and/or those with additional disabilities, as they move from infancy to adulthood.

SPED 120; 145; 219

Transition, and transition planning, and advocacy are addressed throughout the Moderate-Severe disabilities credential. Candidates are reminded throughout all credential courses that their perspective on supporting students with disabilities needs to remain broad in order to always consider their student across the lifespan and to advocate for seamless service and support.

In SPED 120: Introduction to Special Education, teacher candidates are introduced to IEPs, ITPs, and IFSPs and the transition considerations that are required at different levels. An assignment, the School-based Observation and Interview Report/Reflection give candidates the first opportunity in the credential program to discuss methods of successful collaboration in the instruction and support of students with disabilities. This is also addressed in course content related to collaborative methods of service delivery and consideration of student planning and supports across the lifespan and through the use of guest speakers. SPED 145: Designing Effective Environments for Students with Disabilities, addresses school-to-work transition, and community-based and vocational supports at the end of the semester. Utilization of guest speakers with disabilities from the local community and documentary videos related to this topic are utilized as instructional tools. Quizzes are used to assess student knowledge in this area. Additionally, content in SPED 145 specifically addresses IEP and IPP planning for transition-age youth in the areas of community-based and vocational goals and support as well as promotion of self-determination skills through identified and practiced strategies, curriculum, and experiences. Transition times (infant toddler – preschool; preschool – elementary; elementary - middle; middle - high; and high school – adult) are covered in the course, and in their final student project, candidates reflect on person-centered practices and consider ways in which they can support student services, self-determination and self-advocacy during an identified transition.

SPED 146: Assessment and Instruction for Students with Moderate-Severe Disabilities, focuses on the role of the teacher of student with M/S disabilities as an advocate for seamless support and services to their students. This course requires IEP development for students with M/S disabilities; a component is the planning and writing for transition goals/objectives. It also covers additional techniques for self-determination and self-advocacy for the student with M/S disabilities. In the IEP Matrix Project and Ecological and Activity-based Inventory Assignment, students consider transition supports for their focus student.

The Student Project in SPED 156: Effective Communication and Collaborative Partnerships incorporates and interview with a parent/family member/guardian in order for candidates to understand this perspective on planning for and providing support to a student across the life-span including the utilization of student strengths and the sharing of resources and agencies available to support a plan for post-secondary community-based or college based settings.This includes but is not limited to information about assistive technology in post-secondary, ADA rights, vocational rehabilitation, social services, employment agencies, post-secondary programs (community colleges, COE...) independent living centers, sheltered workshops, and specialized services such as those for deaf-blind and other low-incident needs of adults with disabilities.

During SPED 176: Practicum teacher candidates must demonstrate during parent conferences or IEP meetings their ability to serve as an advocate for the student’s service and support.

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