Program Standard 6: Using Educational and Assistive Technology

The program provides opportunities for candidates to acquire the ability to use computer-based technology to facilitate the teaching and learning process. Each candidate demonstrates knowledge and understanding of the appropriate use of computer-based technology for information collection, analysis and management in the instructional setting. Candidates demonstrate knowledge of assistive technology including low and high equipment and materials to facilitate communication, curriculum access, and skill development of students with disabilities.

Program Standard 6 Component:

Courses in which the component is addressed:

Learn computer-based technology to facilitate teaching & learning process

CI 176, SPED 136, 246; 145; 247; LEE 177

Use computer-based technology for information collection, analysis & management of instructional setting

SPED 130; 136; 246; 145; 233; CI 176

Knowledge and analysis of assistive technology (high, low equip and materials to facilitate communication, curriculum access and skill development

SPED 145; 146; 247

Legal & ethical issues involved in use of technology

SPED 136; 247

In CI 176: Mathematics Instruction and Applied Assessment, teacher candidates utilize Excel to organize data, create graphs and make instructional decisions based on student performance. Candidates learn how to input student record assessment data and analyze the data to make instructional decisions (e.g., modifying instruction).

In LEE 177: Teaching Reading and the Arts in Grades K-3, teacher candidates utilize the Internet for research; utilize our online Blackboard for group discussions and as a resource for class notes, website links to professional sites related to literacy teaching and learning; create and EL presentation using PowerPoint or Keynote and other sites such as Animoto and learn ways to create classroom blogs and using sites with elementary students.

In SPED 130: Assessing Students with Special Needs, teacher candidates learn to use computer software, such as CompuScore program of WJ-III, to generate computerized assessment reports and profiles. They acquire skills of using software to generate math, reading and spelling tests; randomize testing samples and academic probe items in preparing informal curriculum-assessments. In SPED 130 teacher candidates also learn data management skills by using Microsoft Excel .

In SPED 136: Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction for Students with Mild/ Moderate Disabilities, teacher candidates learn about assistive technology and effective ways to use technology for teaching and learning. They evaluate an educational website appropriate for the students in their practicum classroom. Students incorporate technology into their Universal Design for Learning/Differentiated Instruction Unit to design and deliver accessible instruction in science, social studies, or mathematics. This course introduces students to issues of copyright, privacy, security, and safety, as well as Acceptable Use Policies, which are also addressed within the university syllabi template. In SPED 246: Specialized Academic Instruction for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities, teacher candidates survey the AT instructional software and devices provided at their school site that facilitate communication, curriculum access, and skill development for students with mild-moderate disabilities. In addition, students evaluate an additional AT tool that has the potential to benefit students at their school site. Students will write a summary and evaluation that describes the existing AT and the 'new' AT software or device and its potential for use as an educational tool. In both of these core curriculum courses, students use technology to present and communicate information and data related to instructional planning and student progress. Students also use Blackboard for weekly online assignments, group discussions, reflections, submitting assignments, and accessing course materials.

SPED 247: Advanced Environment Design and Instruction for Students with Moderate-Severe Disabilities, addresses the assessment and instructional strategies used to develop individualized and culturally sensitive communication systems and related goals. The focus is on strategies to teach communication skills in natural and meaningful contexts. Augmentative and alternative communication systems, as well as other assistive technologies in the classroom are introduced. Specifically, content and resources related to the use of the iPad, iPhone, and iTouch as an augmented communication aide are examined. Webinars by leading researchers in the area of AAC and AT for students who do not rely on verbal communication are used as additional instructional tools. Guest speakers who utilize a range of assistive technologies and augmentative communication supports visit the class to demonstrate the use of technology supports in educational and community environments. The Communication Project, a signature assignment in SPED 247, requires that candidates attend to individual student characteristics (such as mobility, motor planning, positioning, and sensory characteristics) in order to consider a range of no/low-tech and high-tech augmented communication supports and systems.

In SPED 233: The Special Educator as Researcher, teacher candidates demonstrate competence in the use of electronic research tools (including accessing library resources and web-based resources to search for and retrieve information). SPED teacher candidates write an extensive review of the literature. Ethical issues related to copyright, APA citation, and the validity of sites to use as a reference are learned. The course also covers knowledge of privacy, security, and safety issues (appropriate use of social media, confidentiality of records including graded student work, publishing names and pictures of minors, and acceptable use policies) as an ethical educator.

Throughout the credential program, students also develop an electronic portfolio to collect and showcase their work on signature assignments embedded throughout the program, as well as the lessons and units they develop for practicum. Beginning in the Fall, students will have the opportunity to develop a web-based portfolio; they will learn to construct, manage, and present their learning and teaching in a form they can easily and effectively share with others.

M/M Standard 6: Case Management

The program prepares candidates in case management practices and strategies for students with mild/moderate disabilities and for those referred for special education. Candidates are prepared to coordinate the IEP process and service delivery for individuals referred for special education and those identified with mild/moderate disabilities and to address the legal & instructional requirements based on the individual needs of the student with mild/moderate disabilities.

M/M Standard 6 Component:

Courses in which the component is addressed:

prepares candidates in case management practices and strategies for students with mild/moderate disabilities and for those referred for special education.

SPED 120; 125; 130; 136; 246; 171; 175; 219

Candidates receive training in case management practices and strategies for students with mild/moderate disabilities and for those referred for special education. Through a variety of coursework, candidates are prepared to coordinate the IEP process and service delivery for individuals referred for special education and those identified with mild/moderate disabilities and to address the legal & instructional requirements based on the individual needs of the student with mild/moderate disabilities. In SPED 120: Introduction to Special Education, candidates are introduced to the referral, assessment, identification, and IEP development processes via course content and guest speakers. In the School-based Observation and Interview Reflection/Report assignment in SPED 120, candidates have the opportunity to speak with a practicing teacher about these processes. Due process rights of the students and their families are taught and their knowledge of the laws, legal requirements, and timelines are assessed through a midterm exam. The laws and mandates regarding assessment of students with mild/moderate disabilities are covered in SPED 130: Assessment of Students with Special Needs. Candidates are also instructed to summarize and analyze assessment data and write assessment reports, communicating assessment results to parents and other school professionals.

Content in SPED 145: Designing Effective Environments for Students with Disabilities specifically addresses IEP and IPP planning for transition-age youth in the areas of community-based and vocational goals and supports. In SPED 246: Specialized Academic Instruction for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities, teacher candidates develop and write an IEP or IFSP that incorporates legal mandates, state and federal regulations, transition planning, self-determination strategies, coordination of services, and ethical decision-making. Under the guidance and supervision of their Cooperating Teacher, students have the opportunity to participate in the IEP/IFSP process at their practicum site (SPED 175). In addition, teachers learn to design more specialized instruction and apply this knowledge in a Teaching Sample Project.

In SPED 136: Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities, through course content and signature assignments, students learn to plan instruction to support access to the core curriculum. Students have the opportunity to teach their unit in their practicum classroom and evaluate their ability to plan and deliver effective, accessible instruction (SPED 171).

Content related to Standard 6 is also specifically addressed in SPED 219: Effective Communication and Collaborative Partnerships through the Collaborative Teaming Reflection assignment. In this assignment candidates speak with various members of one student’s IEP team in order to determine in what ways the IEP team is functioning effectively and positively, and to develop an action plan in order to address areas which team collaboration to support IEP development and student supports and transitions could be improved. These teams can include parents, general education teachers, other special education service providers, agency representatives, paraprofessionals, administrators, and the student. The teacher candidate’s role in supporting families with resource information is included across the program but is assessed in SPED 219 where they develop home/school/community project focused on a targeted student/family.

In SPED 136: Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities, teacher candidates learn their role in intervention services/referral process (SST/RTI...) and through course content and the signature assignments (UDL/Differentiated Instruction Unit: Parts 1 & 2) students learn to plan instruction to support access to the core curriculum. The UDL/Differentiated Instruction Unit requires students to plan, teach, and reflect on their ability to plan and deliver effective, accessible instruction (SPED 171). In addition, students receive supervisor feedback for at least one lesson taught during this unit.

In SPED 137: Specialized Academic Instruction for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities, students plan an intervention in reading or mathematics and evaluate their instruction based on student response. This course is designed to introduce students to appropriate methodology and an array of research-based strategies that address specialized academic instruction students for students with diverse learning needs, including students with mild-moderate disabilities and English Learners. A major project in this course requires students to plan and implement an intervention designed to support struggling students in reading or mathematics. In addition, co-requisite practicum experience (SPED 175) provides students the opportunity to apply what they’ve learned in this core academic course. In addition, students are required to develop an IEP, including goals and objectives based on a variety of assessment and observational data.

Throughout their fieldwork and practicum experiences (SPED 171/175), teacher candidates are expected to work closely and collaboratively with their Cooperating Teachers, other personnel, students, and families at their assigned school sites, as well as their supervisors, and to participate in all aspects of the teaching profession. They demonstrate their understanding of legal and instructional requirements through meeting assessment timelines, scheduling and attending IEPs, and developing instruction based on IEP identified needs. Lesson plans note both state/CaCC standards and IEP objectives. During Practicum the teacher candidate must collaborate through lesson preparation and IEP development and attendance. They are also required to demonstrate multiple team teaching lessons requiring collaboration. Teacher candidates act as a consultant through their attendance at SST or RTI/MTSS intervention meetings. A local resource guide is provided to candidates and regional Family Resource Centers and Regional Center’s resources are visited and shared. Progress Monitoring systems (such as DIBELS...) for academic achievement and behavior are required, with both RTI and discrepancy model for eligibility shared. Fieldwork and practicum experiences provide a structured and supportive environment in which students can apply what they’ve learned in the university classroom to their teaching.

M/S Standard 6: Positive Behavioral Support

Each candidate demonstrates competence in establishing and maintaining an educational environment that is free from coercion and punishment and where interventions are positive, proactive, and respectful of students. Each candidate demonstrates the ability to design and implement positive behavioral support plans and interventions based on functional behavior assessments, and participate in manifestation determination hearings. Each candidate is able toparticipate effectively in school wide behavior support processes.

M/S Standard 6 Component:

Courses in which the component is addressed:

demonstrates competence in establishing and maintaining an educational environment that is free from coercion and punishment and where interventions are positive, proactive, and respectful of students

SPED 125; 247

demonstrates the ability to design and implement positive behavioral support plans and interventions based on functional behavior assessments, and participate in manifestation determination hearings

SPED 125

able to participate effectively in school wide behavior support processes.

SPED 125

Standard 6 is primarily met through SPED 125: Positive Behavior and Social Supports. This course focuses on: a) theoretical and ethical foundations of positive behavior supports and; b) managing a learning; c) functional behavioral assessment; d) development and implementation of positive behavior support plans, and e) supporting students to develop as self-regulated learners. Teacher candidates complete a Functional Behavioral Assessment on one identified student with challenging behavior. In addition to in-class lectures and class discussion, candidates also complete modules on Functional Assessment at http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/fba/cresource.htm. Based on the data compiled from the functional behavioral assessment, candidates complete a Positive Behavior Support Plan. Students access the PENT website at www.pent.ca.gov for additional assistance in completing both projects. In addition, each candidate designs a classroom management plan for his or her classroom and specific student population. The plan includes the development of rules and expectations; relationship building with students, colleagues and family members; strategies for increasing student engagement and for providing quality instruction; appropriate response to minor misbehavior; interventions for students with challenging behaviors; and finally, a crisis management plan to respond to behavioral and medical emergencies. Case law and case studies are used to introduce candidates to guidelines for special education student removals for disciplinary purposes (e.g., suspensions, expulsions, manifestation determination, and interim alternative placements), and research reports, case law and case studies are used to discuss the issues involved in use of restraints and seclusion in schools. Guidelines for appropriate use are provided.

Additionally, SPED 247: Advanced Environment Design and Instruction for Students with Moderate-Severe Disabilities focuses on the development and implementation of systems that assess, plan for, and provide communication and social skills instruction to support positive behavior in all students—including those who have complex social, communication, behavioral, and emotional needs. Understanding challenging behavior and the relationship to communication and meaningful relationships is used to begin the semester and revisited at the end, as well, and course readings and discussions from the start and end of the semester. Guest speakers (individuals with disabilities and their family members) share personal experiences with local educational systems and use of communication, relationship, and behavioral supports and interventions. Concurrent, supervised fieldwork for both credentials (SPED 171/172 and 175/176) requires that candidates implement these classroom and behavior systems, supports, and strategies that are taught and evaluated through core methods course assignments, as evidence by the Exit Criteria matrix.

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