Program Standard 14: Creating Healthy Learning Environments

Candidates learn how personal, family, school, community and environmental factors are related to students’ academic, physical, emotional and social well-being. Candidates learn about the effects of student health and safety on learning and study the legal responsibilities of teachers related to student health and safety. Programs provide professional development for candidates to understand and utilize universal precautions designed to protect the health and safety of the candidates themselves. Candidates acquire knowledge of diverse family structures, community cultures, and child rearing practices in order to develop respectful and productive relationships with families and communities. Candidates learn how decisions and common behaviors of children and adolescents can enhance or compromise their health and safety. Candidates learn common, chronic and communicable diseases of children and adolescents, and how to make referrals when these diseases are recognizable at school. Candidates learn effective strategies for encouraging the healthy nutrition of children and youth. Candidates have knowledge and understanding of the physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs and tobacco and ways to identify, refer and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional or social health problems. Candidates complete infant, child and adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certification that meets the criteria of the American Heart Association or the American Red Cross.

Program Standard 14 Component:

Courses in which the component is addressed:

Learn how personal, family, school, community and environmental factors are related to students’ academic, physical, emotional and social well-being. Acquire knowledge of diverse family structures, community cultures, and child rearing practices in order to develop respectful and productive relationships with families and communities.

SPED 120; 125; 145; 156; LEE 172; 173; 177

Learn about the effects of student health and safety on learning and study the legal responsibilities of teachers related to student health and safety.

SPED 120; 125; 145

Understand and utilize universal precautions designed to protect the health and safety of the candidates themselves

SPED 120; 125; 145

Learn how decisions and common behaviors of children and adolescents can enhance or compromise their health and safety.

SPED 120; 125

Candidates learn common, chronic and communicable diseases of children and adolescents, and how to make referrals when these diseases are recognizable at school.

Conference on Character and Civic Education
EHD 178; SPED 175/176

Candidates learn effective strategies for encouraging the healthy nutrition of children and youth.

Conference on Character and Civic Education
EHD 178; SPED 175/176

Candidates have knowledge and understanding of the physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs and tobacco and ways to identify, refer and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional or social health problems.

SPED 125; Conference on Character and Civic Education
EHD 178; SPED 175/176

Candidates complete infant, child and adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certification that meets the criteria of the American Heart Association or the American Red Cross.

 

Program Orientations
SPED 175/176
Advising Center

The family structures and community values of diverse groups living in the Fresno State service area are explored in LEE 172: Cultural and Language Contexts of the Classroom. Cross-cultural communication and the language and value challenges encountered are explored through video and class discussions. Candidates acquire knowledge of diverse family structures, community cultures, and child rearing practices in order to be sensitive and aware as they develop respectful and productive relationships with families within the communities. Guest speakers from diverse cultures in the Fresno State service area provide candidates multiple opportunities to interact with people of many cultures and to practice cross-cultural conversations.

In SPED 136: Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities, candidates attend and reflect upon their attendance at an IEP meeting. Parents, teachers, and service providers to students with disabilities share parent expectations for effective communication. In SPED 137: Specialized Instruction for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities, students write an IEP with support from their instructor, and in collaboration with the IEP team at their practicum site (SPED 175: Final Practicum).

Principles of establishing and maintaining active parent involvement are addressed in LEE 173: Teaching Reading and Social Studies in Grades 4-8 and LEE 177: Teaching Reading and the Arts in Grades K-3, as they relate to research on effective schools and the cooperation needed to foster maximum student achievement. The California Standards for the Teaching Profession are examined in these classes as well, and videos and simulation activities providing candidates with effective ways to obtain effective parent involvement are a part of the course activities in order to provide candidates with models for and practice in establishing cooperative relationships with parents. During Phase 3, instructors in SPED 136: Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities and SPED 246: Specialized Instruction for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities examine families' rights and involvement for their children identified with disabilities including pre-referral (RtI), the IEP process, at-risk/504 interventions, and IEP implementation and they are demonstrated through assignments and reflection.

Laws and principles related to student and parent rights, and student placements are examined in SPED 120: Introduction to Special Education. In SPED 145: Designing Effective Environments for Students with Disabilities, candidates learn about the physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs and tobacco and ways to identify, refer and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional or social health problems. Candidates also attend an At-Risk seminar where local community resources are shared and candidates receive a community resource manual and Health Seminar that is conducted by school nurses that relates health issues, referrals, and in the family and community context. They are also taught the health and safety, positioning and handling students who have severe motor disabilities, practices for students who are medically fragile, feeding issues and strategies, policies regarding specialized health care and health practices. A team of local teachers who serve students with these kinds of complex support needs are guest speakers. A formative quiz is used to assess candidates' knowledge of this content.

In SPED 125: Positive Behavior and Social Supports, candidates learn to practice effective strategies and techniques for crisis prevention, conflict management, and resolution in ways that contribute to respectful, effective learning environments, including recognizing and defusing situations that may lead to student conflict or violence. Candidates also learn about the effects of student health and safety on learning and study the legal responsibilities of teachers related to student health and safety in several activities and class discussions cover how decisions and common behaviors of children and adolescents can enhance or compromise their health and safety. Candidates read and discuss several reports related to the use of restraint and seclusion (i.e., School is Not Supposed to Hurt, The Cost of Waiting, and Restraint and Seclusion in California Schools). Candidates are provided with resources and guidelines to prevent/reduce/eliminate restraint and seclusion except as an emergency intervention.

All teacher candidates are required to attend the Conference on Character and Civic Education held each spring. This event is co-sponsored by the Kremen School of Education and Human Development and the Bonner Center for Character Education. During the conference, there are opportunities for teacher candidates to attend workshop sessions dealing with issues such as: child abuse, mandated reporting, health and safety of students, and laws pertaining to teacher/student rights. Multiple workshop sessions are offered to assist teacher candidates in understanding the physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs, and tobacco and of ways to identify, refer and support students and their families. Candidates learn how decisions and common behaviors of children and adolescents can enhance or compromise their health and safety. Candidates learn common chronic and communicable diseases of children and adolescents, and how to make referrals when these diseases are recognizable at school. Candidates also learn effective strategies for encouraging the healthy nutrition of children and youth. In SPED 125: Positive Behavior and Social Supports, candidates learn ways to identify, refer, and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional, or social health problems.

During fieldwork (EHD 178; SPED 171/172; 175/176) candidates are required to attend seminars to learn about the effects of student health and safety on learning and study the legal responsibilities of teachers related to student health and safety with special emphasis on their responsibility and the steps to take to report abuse (CPS). Candidates learn effective strategies for encouraging the healthy nutrition of children and youth, along with required immunizations, and how to make referrals common, chronic and communicable diseases of children when they are recognizable at schoolin a required seminar conducted by school nurses. They also are required to understand the physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs and tobacco and ways to identify, refer and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional or social health problems during seminars and though use of the Resource Manual provided.

During program orientations candidates are informed that they must complete CPR certification within one year of applying for their Preliminary Education Specialist teaching credential. Opportunities to complete the training are emailed to all the candidates. The credential analyst

assures that they have completed this requirement prior to submitting their request for a credential to the state.

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