Standard 2

Growth and Development

The program provides candidates with opportunities and experiences to acquire an understanding of typical and atypical growth and development, Understand school, community and family environmental factors and their influence on pupil learning including relevant theories, research, and other information related to pupils’ strengths and weaknesses that affect learning in school, community and family environments. The program provides candidates with an understanding of the effects of (a) health and developmental factors, (b) language, (c) cultural variables, (d) diversity, (e) socioeconomic status, and (f) factors of resiliency on pupil development.

Introduction

Candidates for the PPS credential with specializations in school social work and child welfare and attendance demonstrate knowledge of typical and atypical growth and development, including relevant research and theories, and other information related to pupil strengths and weaknesses that affect learning. Candidates also demonstrate knowledge of the possible influence of health and developmental factors, cultural variables, diversity, socioeconomic status and language on pupil development. Demonstration that each content area has been satisfactorily learned and applied is evidenced by a passing grade in all courses, an overall grade point average of 3.0 or higher, and a grade of “Credit” for the field practicum. The courses that address each of the specific content areas are discussed below. Complete course syllabi for all M.S.W. and PPS program classes can be found in Part II of the Program Assessment document.

Knowledge of relevant research and theories of typical and atypical human growth and development, as they relate to pupil progress

Students are introduced to major theories of typical human development in the foundation course, Human Behavior in the Social Environment: A Multi Systems Approach (S Wrk 212). S Wrk 212 underscores a multi systems perspective in understanding individual development and behavior over the life span and includes consideration of factors that can negatively affect a child’s development and school performance. Traditional and alternative biological and social science theories are examined in light of the research evidence. For example, see S Wrk 212, Week 6-8.

The foundation practice courses, S Wrk 220 and S Wrk 221, build upon this knowledge base by developing skills for psychosocial assessment and multi systems intervention that carefully consider developmental factors. In the second year, students address specific issues of human growth and development related to a child’s functioning and progress in the school setting in Advanced Field Instructed Practice I and II (S Wrk 282 and S Wrk 283).   For example, see competency 6,

biopsychosocial assessments in the PPS learning agreement addendum. Social work knowledge and skills are applied in practice within a school setting and discussed in the companion practice courses, Advanced Social Work Practice in Schools I and II (S Wrk 274 and 275).

Understand school, community and family environmental factors and their influence on pupil learning

Social Welfare Policy I (S Wrk 200) introduces students to the philosophical and historical foundations of the social work profession and promotes knowledge and understanding of the policies, programs, services and processes within social welfare. For example, see week 5, Defining Poverty. Social Welfare Policy II

(S Wrk 203) emphasizes the analysis of major social welfare policies and programs with attention to social, political, economic, cultural, and ideological factors. As an example, see week 13 on ProgramEligibility:Who gets what?

Together, these courses address societal responses to problems and needs of defined populations, including persons with low-incomes, racial and ethnic minorities, children, and vulnerable and oppressed groups. There are two courses in the Human Behavior in the Social Environment sequence that address a wide range of social and cultural influences that may affect the developing child and his or her functioning in the school setting. Human Behavior in the Social Environment: A Multi Systems Approach (S Wrk

212) focuses on the impact of social and cultural influences on individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities, such as in Week4 and 5:

Human Behavior in the Social Environment: Cultural Diversity and Oppression (S Wrk 213) then

considers conceptual frameworks and specific issues related to cultural diversity and disempowerment that may affect human behavior, including pupils in a school setting ( see the outline of Course Content.)

The influence of social and cultural factors in the analysis and application of the theories, principles and techniques of social work practice are addressed in the Seminar in Foundations for Social Work Practice I and II (S Wrk 220 and S Wrk 221), and the first-year practicum, Field Instructed Practice I and II (S Wrk

280 and S Wrk 281). For example, see the following exercise in S Wrk 221:   Skill Practice: Using anarrative approach with an individual client.

In the second year of the field placement, Advanced Field Instructed Practice I and II (S Wrk 282 and S Wrk 283) and Advanced Social Work Practice in Schools I and II (S Wrk 274 and S Wrk 275), students examine the influence of these factors in their practice in qualified school settings and in their discussions in the companion practice course. One example of this content can be found in weeks 15 and 16 of the course schedule for S Wrk 274 Striving for Equal Educational Opportunity

Knowledge of factors that impede or limit pupil development including stereotyping, socioeconomic status, inadequate language development, negative school climate, and discrimination

Social Welfare Policy I (S Wrk 200) introduces students to the philosophical and historical foundations of the social work profession and promotes knowledge and understanding of the policies, programs, services and processes within social welfare. Social Welfare Policy II (S Wrk 203) emphasizes the analysis of major social welfare policies and programs with attention to social, political, economic, cultural, and ideological factors. For example, see the following topic for week 8 in S Wrk 230: Globalization,immigration, and the welfare state. Together, these courses address potential developmental effects of societal responses to problems and needs of defined populations, including persons with low-incomes, racial and ethnic minorities, children, and vulnerable and oppressed groups.   The Human Behavior in the Social Environment courses address issues of stereotyping, family influences and socioeconomic status that may affect the developing child and his or her functioning in all contexts, including the school setting.

Human Behavior in the Social Environment: A Multi Systems Approach (S Wrk 212) examines the impact of stereotyping, inadequate language development and socioeconomic status on individuals and their families as well as at the broader level of social groups, organizations such as schools, and communities; Human Behavior in the Social Environment: Cultural Diversity and Oppression (S Wrk 213) considers conceptual frameworks and specific issues related to stereotyping, discrimination and socioeconomic status that may affect human development and behavior, including pupils in a school setting. Ethnicity-Identity/Oppression is a representative assignment from S Wrk 213 that demonstrates alignment with this standard. The influence of all of these factors is also addressed in the analysis and application of the theories, principles and techniques of social work practice in the Seminar in Foundations for Social Work Practice I and II (S Wrk 220 and S Wrk 221), and the first-year practicum, Field Instructed Practice I and II (S Wrk 280 and S Wrk 281). Students specifically address the factors impeding pupil development in their second year field placements in qualified school settings (Advanced Field Instructed Practice I and II, S Wrk 282 and S Wrk 283) and in their discussions in the companion practice courses, Advanced Social Work Practice in Schools I and II (S Wrk 274 and S Wrk 275). One topic area from S Wrk 274 that demonstrates this standard is School Climate: Classroom Management.

Knowledge of principles and methods to (a) help pupils overcome barriers to learning and (b) learn effective strategies to plan, organize, monitor and take responsibility for their own learning

In the first year, students are introduced to social work practice principles and methods in the practice courses, Seminar in Foundations for Social Work Practice I and II(S Wrk 220 and S Wrk 221). These two practice courses, along with the first year field practicum, provide students with a foundation for practice with small systems, such as individuals and families, and set the stage for the student’s focused practice in the school setting in the second year. In the second year of the program, students enroll in the Seminar in Social Work Practice with Individuals (S Wrk 224). This advanced practice course further develops their knowledge of the principles, methods and skills used to help pupils engage their strengths in order to develop effective ways to plan and take responsibility for their own learning. One example from S Wrk 224 can be found in the course session that addresses Disorders of Childhood and Adolescence.Practice skills are applied, under supervision, in a qualified PPS school setting in Advanced Field Instructed Practice I and II (S Wrk 282 and S Wrk 283). For example, the PPS learning agreement addendum, competency #6, includes assignments in the identification of school and community factorsthat inhibit learning progress and use this information to develop programs and activities to promote pupilsuccess.

Specific practice issues and methods are examined in the companion practice courses, Advanced Social Work Practice in Schools I and II (S Wrk 274 and S Wrk 275). S Wrk 282/283 and S Wrk 274/275 contribute to the student’s learning in a complementary fashion in that practice experiences gained in S Wrk 282 and S Wrk 283 inform the discussions in S Wrk 274 and S Wrk 275 and the knowledge developed in S Wrk 274 and 275 is applied in practice in S Wrk 282 and 283.

Knowledge of risk factors and protective assets that inhibit or facilitate pupils’ positive development

The Human Behavior in the Social Environment courses provide the foundation knowledge of risk factors and protective assets that influence human development. This content includes influences at multiple systems levels (S Wrk 212) and from a cultural diversity perspective (S Wrk 213). Both of the school social work/CWA classes (S Wrk 274 and S Wrk 275) provide specific content on the school environment and school-age pupils. For example, the Group Presentation assignment in S Wrk 275 includes content on the factors that place different pupil groups at educational risk - Risk Factors. All of this content is reinforced through both years of field instructed practice (S Wrk 280/281 and S Wrk 282/283) where students have the opportunity to assess for risk and protective factors and provide direct intervention in response to the assessment.

Knowledge of models that can be used to inform school staff and parents about developmental trajectories that are associated with pupils becoming involved in antisocial or aggressive behavior

The Human Behavior in the Social Environment sequence provides the foundation knowledge of developmental factors at the individual, family, group, organizational and community levels that are associated with antisocial or aggressive behavior (S Wrk 212 and S Wrk 213). For example, S Wrk 212 explores social learning theory in Week8.

Specific models of practice to inform school staff and parents of such developmental trajectories are provided inS Wrk 224, Advanced Practice with Individuals, (see class session on Personality Disorders) S Wrk 274 and 275, Advanced School Work Practice in Schools I and II. Further opportunity to learn about practice models and to apply them with school staff and parents is provided in the PPS field placement, S Wrk 282 and S Wrk 283.

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