B.2:   Professional Skills and Training

Standard 19

Wellness and Resiliency Promotion

Candidates demonstrate the ability to promote healthy emotional development and resiliency of pupils by designing, implementing and evaluating services and programs at the individual, group, and institutional level. These programs and services are designed for pupils, staff, families, and communities to maximize educational, social and emotional outcomes.

Introduction

PPS candidates demonstrate the ability to promote healthy emotional development and resiliency of pupils through effective program planning, intervention, and evaluation. They also demonstrate the ability to assess strengths and to design, implement and evaluate services at multiple systems levels to support positive academic, social and emotional outcomes. Matrix 19-1 illustrates the specific content and MSW courses which provide this content.

Ability to promote healthy emotional development and resiliency

The Human Behavior in the Social Environment courses include content on child and youth development and the small and large system factors which influence development. S Wrk 212 addresses developmental factors at the individual and family level. Major theories of child and youth development, including Piaget, Freud and Erickson, are reviewed beginning in Week6

There is a careful examination of expectable behaviors of infants, toddlers, early school age, middle school age, early adolescence and late adolescence. The family context is a focus in this course as well as S Wrk 227, Social Work Practice with Couples and Families. The necessary components of family support to facilitate healthy development, including academic success, are examined. The importance of understanding child development is emphasized as a foundation for effective social work practice with youth. The concept of resiliency is explored and the role of individual and family factors in fostering resiliency is addressed.

S Wrk 212 also provides content about factors at the larger systems levels, such as the school setting, which influence pupil development and academic success. Course content examines the specific features and dynamics of complex organizations, such as school systems, from a social systems perspective and seeks to achieve an understanding of those factors that promote healthy emotional development and pupil success. Both school social work classes, S Wrk 274 and S Wrk 275, add specific information on the school setting as a formal organization. Topics such as school climate, classroom management, violence prevention, and teacher consultation are explored in-depth to facilitate candidate understanding of organizational factors that promote wellness and resiliency. For example, see course content on SchoolClimate.

Assessment of strengths

S Wrk 213, Cultural Diversity and Oppression, enhances this foundation knowledge of the developmental influence of small and large system factors by emphasizing the cultural context for these influences. Both years of field internship, S Wrk 280/281 and S Wrk 282/283, provide candidates with the opportunity to conduct assessments, design and implement interventions, and evaluate their practice at the individual, group and institutional level. The second year of internship, S Wrk 282/283, provides the advanced field practicum in the schools. Candidates complete 600 hours of supervised, school-based practice and engage consistently in practice experiences that promote healthy emotional development and resiliency to support pupil success.

S Wrk 220 and S Wrk 221, Foundations for Social Work Practice I and II, introduce candidates to social work practice at multiple system levels: individual; family; group; organization; and community. The basic components of assessment are presented and further developed throughout the advanced practice concentration. Candidates are explicitly taught about strengths and assets at all systems levels. For example, see the class content from S Wrk 220 on Conducting Strength-based Interventions. Each advanced practice course focuses on one of the five systems levels and provides in-depth content on assessment at each respective level. Thus, S Wrk 224, Advanced Social Work Practice with Individuals, examines multi dimensional assessment of the individual. Candidates learn specific practice strategies for conducting assessment, including gathering relevant information in areas such as school performance, peer relationships, and family history. Evaluation of information includes identification of individual strengths and assets. Similarly, S Wrk 246 and S Wrk 247 provide content on assessment of the formal organization and community, respectively. Candidates learn to conduct assessment at the larger systems levels, identify strengths as well as barriers, and understand the reciprocal influence of all impinging systems. For example, see the following course assignment from S Wrk 247, a Needs Assessment Paper.

Central to the assessment process is the ability to recognize precursors of dysfunctional behaviors. In order to promote wellness and resiliency, school social workers need to be able to recognize early indicators of problems with social, emotional or academic functioning and provide early intervention services. S Wrk 212, HBSE: A Multi Systems Approach, provides the theoretical foundation for normative development as well as indicators of developmental problems. S Wrk 224, Advanced Social Work Practice with Individuals, adds specific practice content in the assessment of individuals, including early indicators of difficulties such as poor attendance, change in grades, or problems with peer relationships. For example, see the class session on Disorders of Childhood and Adolescence. Both of the school social work classes, S Wrk 274 and S Wrk 275, provide specific practice content on precursors of dysfunctional behaviors with school-age youth. Candidates demonstrate this knowledge through both years of field internship, S Wrk 280/281 and S Wrk 282/283. Students complete a minimum of six individual, multidimensional assessments each year of the practicum, as well as assessment with families, groups, organizations and communities.

Service planning, implementation and evaluation

PPS candidates acquire skills through the classroom and the field internships to conceptualize and plan prevention, direct intervention, and crisis intervention services in the school, home and community. The advanced, multi-systems concentration of the MSW/PPS program prepares students for autonomous practice at all of these systems levels. Thus, candidates utilize knowledge of human development to conduct multi dimensional assessments and plan services in response to client/constituent needs.

Each advanced practice course presents knowledge and skills for intervention at its respective level: individual, family, group, organization, and community. The importance of adapting service delivery to a variety of practice contexts is emphasized as a necessity in today’s practice environment. Thus, candidates learn to provide social work services in homes, schools, and organizations such as schools and juvenile hall, as well as communities. Both of the school social work classes, S Wrk 274 and S Wrk 275, provide specific knowledge and skills for service delivery in the schools and related systems such as the home and community.

Both years of field practicum, S Wrk 280/281 and S Wrk 282/283, provide candidates with the opportunity to demonstrate skills in service planning, implementation and evaluation at multiple systems levels. The learning agreement that guides the internship experience for each semester of field practicum includes specific practice assignments in service planning, implementation, and evaluation at the individual, family, group, organization, and community levels. One example is found in the S Wrk 282 learning agreement assignment to Participate in the mutual development of goals and service planning atthe individual, group and organizational level.

Specific examples of PPS intern assignments that demonstrate these skills include participation in team processes such as Student Study and IEP meetings as well as consultation with teachers and collaboration with families.

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION
PPS CREDENTIAL PROGRAM

 MATRIX 19-1

STANDARD #19

 

 

Policy

HBSE

Practice

Field

Research

School Social Work

CWA

Wellness and Resiliency Promotion

200, 203

212, 213

220, 221 224,225, 227, 246 247

280/ 281 282/283

260, 261 292 298/299

274 275

274 275

Factors to consider:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ability to promote healthy emotional development and resiliency

 

212,213

227

280/281

 

274 275

 

Assessment of strengths

 

212

220,221 224,225, 227, 246 247

280/281 282/283

 

274 275

 

Service planning, implementation and evaluation

 

 

220,221 224,225, 227, 246 247

280/281 282/283

 

274 275

 

Top of Page