C.1: Core Knowledge Base and Foundation

Standard 1

Professional Role of Child Welfare and Attendance Provider

The program provides candidates with knowledge and understanding of the history, philosophy and trends in Child Welfare and Attendance (CWA) Programs, particularly as they relate to the professional role of the CWA Supervisor as a student advocate.

Introduction

The PPS credential program with specializations in school social work and child welfare and attendance provides candidates with an understanding of the professional role of the CWA provider. This understanding includes knowledge of the history, philosophy and trends in child welfare and attendance as well as knowledge and skills for advocacy. The MSW and PPS courses which include this content are depicted in Matrix 1-1.

Knowledge of Child Welfare and Attendance and the Role of the CWA provider

PPS candidates are provided with knowledge and gain understanding of the history, philosophy and trends in Child Welfare and Attendance in the PPS courses, S Wrk 274 and S Wrk 275. S Wrk 274, Advanced Social Work Practice in the Schools I, provides the foundation for understanding the role of the CWA provider through knowledge of the history, philosophy and trends of child welfare and attendance services. It is presented along with the history of school social work at the beginning of the course because all credential candidates in this program pursue both the school social work and CWA specializations. For example, see course content from S Wrk 274 in week 2 on the Overview of SchoolSocial Work. Topics which are examined include the philosophy and value of public education for all citizens, the history of compulsory attendance and the many legal, religious and philosophical challenges to the laws surrounding compulsory attendance. Trends in school social work and CWA intervention are also explored to facilitate understanding of the current status of these professional roles and responsibilities. Additional content on pupil rights, special education, and equal educational opportunity is also presented. This content begins in week 9 and continues through week 16 as noted in the syllabus under Part II, The Legal and Policy Parameters of School Social Work and Child Welfare and AttendanceServices and Implications for Practice. These policy areas are aligned with both the historical and philosophical trends of the CWA specialization. In S Wrk 275, Advanced Social Work Practice in Schools II, candidates learn advanced practice strategies used in CWA programs for addressing the myriad of barriers that interfere with attendance and academic success.

PPS candidates acquire knowledge about the professional role of the CWA provider in tandem with their professional development as social workers. The knowledge and skills for both specializations are presented throughout the PPS program in an integrated fashion. There is an excellent “fit” between the role of the school social worker and the CWA provider. This integrated curricular design is intended to facilitate this “fit” and prepare candidates for the varied and complex responsibilities of both specializations.

Orientation to the professional role of a social worker occurs primarily in S Wrk 220 and S Wrk 221, Foundations for Social Work Practice I and II. PPS candidates enroll in these courses during the foundation year of the MSW program. They are introduced to Social Work as a helping profession and explore the values and purpose of social work as well as the change process. They also explore the multiple roles of a social worker, many of which are applicable to the CWA provider. The roles are introduced early in the course as part of The Generalist Problem-Solving Model.

For example, both social workers and CWA providers function as consultants, advocates and brokers for linking students and families to needed resources. S Wrk 220 and S Wrk 221 also provide foundation knowledge to prepare candidates to deliver effective services by addressing the helping relationship, engagement skills, and skills for communication, problem solving and intervention. These skills are further developed throughout the advanced practice concentration for application at each respective systems level: individual; family; group; formal organization; and, community.

CWA Supervisor as a student advocate

Knowledge and skills for advocacy are taught in all of the practice courses, S Wrk 220, S Wrk 221, S Wrk 224, S Wrk 225, S Wrk 227, S Wrk 246 and S Wrk 247. In keeping with the program mission, candidates learn to provide advanced, multi systems intervention that demonstrates a commitment to social justice, diversity/cultural competence, and empowerment. Both of the school social work/CWA courses, S Wrk 274 and S Wrk 275, provide specific content on the role of the school social worker and CWA provider. Among the many roles assumed in school social work and CWA is that of an advocate. Strategies for advocacy in the school setting and with community organizations on behalf of at-risk and under-achieving youth are examined.

This knowledge and its accompanying skills are put into practice during the advanced field practicum in the schools, S Wrk 282 and S Wrk 283. Candidates participate in a range of learning assignments to prepare them for the role of a CWA provider. These assignments are outlined in the S Wrk 282 and S Wrk 283 learning agreements as well as in the PPS learning agreement addendum. For example, PPS competency # 2 includes assignments in pupil advocacy. Required assignments include assessment, intervention, consultation, collaboration, brokering and evaluation of attendance related problems with students. Advocacy is central to effectively carrying out these assignments and occurs at all systems levels.

Department of Social Work Education PPS Credential Program

MATRIX 1-1

STANDARD #1

 

Policy

HBSE

Practice

Field

Research

School Social Work

CWA

Professional Role of the Child Welfare and Attendance Provider

200, 203

212, 213

220, 221 224, 225 227,246, 247

280,281 282, 283

260, 261 292 298/299

274 275

274 275

Factors to consider:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

History, philosophy and trends in CWA programs

 

 

 

 

 

 

274

Knowledge and skills for advocacy

 

 

220, 221 224, 225 227,246, 247

282, 283

 

274 275

274 275

Back to Top