STANDARD 5: Assessment of Students

The program provides opportunities for candidates to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to assess students in a comprehensive manner within the breadth of the credential authorization. Each candidate understands and uses multiple sources of information in order to participate in progress monitoring and in decision making regarding eligibility and services. The program provides candidates with the knowledge and skill to assess students from diverse backgrounds and varying language, communication, and cognitive abilities. The program provides opportunities for using both formal and informal assessments to evaluate students' needs and strengths for the purpose of making accommodations, modifications, instructional decisions and ongoing program improvements. The program provides the opportunities for each candidate to demonstrate the knowledge of required statewide assessments and local, state and federal accountability systems.

Progress monitoring and in decision making regarding eligibility and services (see course syllabus CDDS 209, 257).

Assessments to evaluate students' needs and strengths for the purpose of making accommodations, modifications, instructional decisions and ongoing program improvements (see course syllabus for CDDS 230, 257, 218).

In CDDS 218, Seminar in Autism and Augmentative and Alternative Communication (Exhibit 1), students are taught to write target behaviors and treatment plans that lead to accommodating the needs of children with severe disabilities, including autism, in a classroom setting. In CDDS 214, Seminar in Language Disorders in Children (Exhibit 2), modifications to delivery of curriculum for children with severe disabilities are discussed.

The knowledge of required statewide assessments and local, state and federal accountability systems (see course syllabus for CDDS 257).

SLP STANDARD 5
Management of Speech and Language Disorders

Each candidate exhibits comprehension of methodsin a school setting of preventing communication disorders including, but not limited to, family/caregiver and teacher in-service, consultation, and collaboration. Candidates demonstrate knowledge of intervention strategies for a variety of speech, language, hearing, and swallowing disorders. Candidates use a variety of school-based service delivery models, which may include but are not limited to: pull-out, push-in, group, classroom consultation and/or collaboration, and co-teaching. Candidates will have opportunities to use curriculum materials commonly used in a school’s core curriculum in the service delivery modes employed. Each candidate uses appropriate intervention strategies for individuals from culturally/linguistically/ socioeconomically diverse populations, including the use of interpreters/translators and the facilitation of second language/dialect acquisition. Candidates use effective behavioral intervention strategies and effectively monitor the progress of students in school settings. Each candidate demonstrates proficiency in the training of students and families/caregivers, teachers and/or other professionals in the use of augmentative and alternative communication systems. Candidates exhibit knowledge of rehabilitative procedures with individuals who have hearing impairments, including the use of assistive listening devices.

In a school setting (see course syllabus CDDS 214).

In CDDS 214, Seminar in Language Disorders in Children (Exhibit 1), information is given regarding legal mandates governing disciplinary actions as applied to students with disabilities. Students are taught principles of positive behavior support (PBS) as the model mandated by the state of California in helping students with behavioral difficulties. In addition, the role of the SLP in helping to design and implement behavior support plans and in monitoring the progress of students under those plans is discussed.

Also in CDDS 214, students are required to demonstrate their knowledge of “red flags” for the development of language disorders and reading disabilities by devising an outline of an in-service for teachers and for parents, describing typical speech and language development, and indicators that a child might be at risk for language and/or reading disabilities. The outline should also include suggestions for supporting speech and language development in at risk children, along with a list of local resources families may turn to for additional help.

In CDDS 218, Seminar in Autism and Augmentative and Alternative Communication (Exhibit 1), students are taught fundamental principles of functional behavior analysis, particularly as they apply to discovering possible causes of undesirable behavior in children with autism. Indirect methods of reducing undesirable behaviors are described.

Also in CDDS 218, students are taught to recognize “red flags” indicating a possible diagnosis in children with autism as young as 9 months of age. They are provided practice in recognizing signs of autism through an in-class activity in which videotapes of typically developing infants, toddlers, and preschool children are compared to videotapes of same-age children with autism. Students are also instructed to use a family-centered framework in encouraging families to seek out early intervention to maximize children’s potential to access curriculum in integrated school settings.

Effective behavioral intervention strategies and effectively monitor the progress of students in school settings (see course syllabus CDDS 215).