Category B: Curriculum and Fieldwork

Standard 2: Promoting a Culture of Literacy

The program provides opportunities for candidates to review current research on elements of an effective culture of literacy at the classroom, school, district, and community levels, including the clear and strategic use of reading, writing, listening, and speaking throughout the day, across a variety of contexts using narrative, expository and other texts, and developing online and offline reading and writing skills to meet the diverse needs of students, and the effective implementation of the adopted curriculum including the use of peer coaching and professional development.

Candidates enrolled in the Reading and Literacy Added Authorization program are exposed throughout their training to current research on the elements of an effective culture of literacy across K-12 classroom, school, district, and community contexts. Candidates review research on the strategic integration of multiple areas of literacy (i.e., reading, writing, listening, speaking, and visual representation) and the organization of instructional activities and environments in highlighted in LEE 213: Teaching the Language Arts K-12 (See Course Description LEE 213: Teaching the Language Arts K-12, p.1; See Course Schedule LEE 213: Teaching the Language Arts K-12, p.6). The influences of student motivation on literacy engagement are explored through Self-Determination Theory, Expectancy-Value Theory, and Sociocultural Theory in LEE 278: Reading Processes & Practices (See Course Schedule LEE 278: Reading Processes & Practices, p.6), and the specific research on evaluating and constructing engaging instructional approaches are further examined in LEE 224: Assessment & Development of Reading Abilities (See Course Schedule LEE 224: Assessment & Development of Reading Abilities, p. 6). Candidates also examine the distinct contributions that narrative, content area texts, and online media make to students’ overall literacy development, and the specific research on evaluating and constructing practices that support adolescent disciplinary literacies and 21st Century literacies (See Course Schedule LEE 213: Teaching the Language Arts K-12, p.6; See Course Schedule LEE 224: Assessment & Development of Reading Abilities, p. 6). In addition, candidates examine the structural components of a culture of literacy. Specifically, candidates examine the important role collaboration and communication among classroom teachers, reading teachers, administrators, and parents in increasing the effectiveness of intervention models (See Course Schedule LEE 224: Assessment & Development of Reading Abilities, p. 6; LEE 230: Supervised Teaching of Reading/Language Arts, p. 7).

The program provides opportunities for candidates to review current research on the role of a culture of literacy for: acknowledging the language and literacy experiences of the individual child, classroom, school, district, and community, honoring and capitalizing on students’ diverse knowledge, skills, abilities, and backgrounds to engage students, their families, and the community in the acquisition of English literacy skills; developing a strong, coherent, and shared vision of a culture of literacy that aligns resources to support high academic expectations for student achievement in reading and literacy; and fostering students’ independence, engagement, motivation, and positive attitude towards reading, and development of a lifelong habit of reading and writing for pleasure and information.

The program provides opportunities for candidates to review current research on the role of a culture of literacy for acknowledging the language and literacy experiences of the individual child and diverse cultural groups.  Specifically, candidates review research that examines education’s place in a broader social context, the resources and assets within diverse cultural communities, and practices that encourage community-education partnerships. Emphasis is placed on understanding how the intersection of culture and literacy practices in terms of students’ funds of knowledge and multiple literacies can be utilized to engage students, their families, and the community in the acquisition of English literacy skills (See Course Schedule LEE 213: Teaching the Language Arts K-12, p.6).

LEE 215: Language Issues in Reading deepens this knowledge by focusing on developing a strong, coherent and shared vision of a culture of literacy that supports language acquisition and literacy development of English Learners. Special emphasis is placed on enhancing instruction for culturally and linguistically diverse learners by aligning resources to support high academic expectations.  Candidates specifically review research on multilevel collaboration models, where parents, community members and all school personnel share responsibility for student learning, as well as specific models that connect children, culture, curriculum and text to foster academic language development (See Course Schedule LEE 215: Language Issues in Reading, p. 7).

Candidates are provided multiple opportunities to review current research on the role of a culture of literacy for fostering student engagement, motivation, and positive attitude towards reading and development of a lifelong habit to engage in literate activities.  The influences of student motivation on literacy engagement are explored in LEE 278: Reading Processes & Practices (See Course Schedule LEE 278: Reading Processes & Practices, p.6), and the specific research on evaluating and constructing engaging instructional approaches are further examined in LEE 224: Assessment & Development of Reading Abilities (See Course Schedule LEE 224: Assessment & Development of Reading Abilities, p. 6). The research reviewed includes school level and classroom structural factors as well as instructional practices, such as fostering goal-oriented learning, stimulating intrinsic motivation, supporting student academic self-efficacy, valuing cultural practices and resources, and constructing instructional contexts that involve collaborative structures and infuse real-world connections.

The program provides opportunities for candidates to review current research on factors that support/develop a culture of literacy at the classroom, school, district, and community levels.

The program is designed to provide candidates opportunities to review current research on factors that develop/support a culture of literacy. The design intentionally exposes candidates to research that examines how a culture of literacy is developed and sustained through a synergistic combination of instructional and structural factors that permeate the contextual boundaries of classroom, school and community. The mutual interplay of these factors across contexts is intentionally demonstrated through continuous review across program courses, including building on funds of knowledge to promote community-classroom links, developing instruction that leverages the reciprocity of literacy skills, and organizing a collaborative school structures that promote shared responsibility for the academic achievement of all students (See Course Schedules LEE 213: Teaching the Language Arts K-12, p.6; LEE 215: Language Issues in Reading, p. 7; LEE 224: Assessment & Development of Reading Abilities, p. 6; LEE 230: Supervised Teaching of Reading/Language Arts, p. 7).

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