Standard 8: Pedagogical Preparation for Subject-Specific Content Instruction

Standard 8-A:  Pedagogical Preparation for Subject-Specific Content Instruction by Multiple Subject (MS) Candidates
In subjects other than Reading-Language Arts, the preliminary teacher preparation program provides introductory coursework and supervised practice that begin to prepare each candidate for a Multiple Subject (MS) teaching credential to plan and deliver content-specific instruction consistent with state-adopted academic content standards for students and curriculum frameworks in the following major subject areas:  mathematics, science, history-social science, visual and performing arts, physical education, and health.  In the program, MS candidates apply the appropriate Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs) to the teaching of each major subject area. They learn and use specific pedagogical knowledge and skills that comprise the subject-specific TPEs for multiple subject candidates.  In each major subject area, MS candidates demonstrate basic ability to plan and implement instruction that fosters student achievement of state-adopted academic content standards for students, using appropriate instructional strategies and materials.  In the program, candidates begin to interrelate ideas and information within and across the major subject areas.

In subjects other than Reading/Language Arts, the Multiple Subject Credential program at Fresno State provides introductory coursework and supervised practice that begin to prepare each candidate for a Multiple Subject Teaching Credential to plan and deliver content-specific instruction consistent with state-adopted academic content standards for students and curriculum frameworks in the following major subject areas:  mathematics ( CI 176: Mathematics Instruction and Applied Assessment); science ( CI 175: Science Instruction and Applied Technology); history-social science ( LEE 173: Teaching Reading and Social Studies in Grades 4-8 and EHD 174: Field Study A: Grades 4-8 seminars); the visual and performing arts LEE 177: Teaching Reading and the Arts in Grades K-3 and EHD 178: Field Study B: Grades K-3 seminars); and physical education and health ( EHD 170: Final Student Teaching seminars as well as the undergraduate course Kinesiology 152: Physical Education for Children).

In the program, Multiple Subject Credential program candidates apply Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs) to the teaching of each major subject area, and they learn and use specific pedagogical knowledge and skills that comprise the subject-specific TPEs for Multiple Subject Candidates and demonstrate their abilities to effectively teach these concepts and skills in their fieldwork placements ( EHD 174: Field Study A: Grades 4-8, EHD 178: Field Study B: Grades K-3, and EHD 170: Final Student Teaching).  In each major subject area, Multiple Subject credential program candidates demonstrate the basic ability to plan and implement instruction that fosters student achievement of state-adopted academic content standards for students, using appropriate instructional strategies and materials as part of the lessons and units they prepare in all content-specific coursework and implement in their fieldwork placements.  In the program, candidates begin to inter-relate ideas and information within and across the major subject areas as demonstrated by their ability to design integrated units of study and teach them effectively in their field placements.

In EHD 170, final student teaching all teacher candidates are required to attend seminars in support of: Learning to Create a Supportive, Healthy Environment for Student Learning and Physical Education.  The state adopted content standards are used as a basis for all seminars.

The first seminar focuses on activities that help the candidates access community resources and agencies, in order to provide integrated support to meet the individual needs of each student, including social, health, educational, language services, and other resources.  Each candidate is given a resource guide produced by the Fresno Metro Ministry. Group work and scenarios are used to help the candidates become familiar with the resources. The Fresno Metro Ministry Resource Book is used in this seminar and also in their SPED 179 course.  The second presenter is from Child Protective Services. This presenter helps candidates become familiar with the legal responsibilities of teachers related to student health, safety, and the reporting requirements relating to child abuse. Their role as a mandated reporter responding to inappropriate and or violent behavior is reviewed. [See EHD 170 syllabus.]

A team of school nurses leads this three-hour seminar on creating a supportive, healthy environment for student learning. Candidates learn how decisions and common behaviors of children and adolescents can enhance or compromise their health and safety.  Candidates learn common chronic and communicable diseases of children and adolescents, and how to make referrals when these diseases are recognizable at school. The physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs, alcohol, drugs, and tobacco and of ways to identify, refer, and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional or social health problems. Candidates also learn effective strategies for encouraging the healthy nutrition of children and youth. The nurses show slides, video clips, give handouts, and have the candidates participate in group activities.

During the EHD 178 Field Placement, candidates participate in an interactive seminar where candidates learn to practice effective strategies and techniques for crisis prevention, conflict management, and resolution in ways that contribute to respectful, effective learning environments, including recognizing and defusing situations that may lead to student conflict or violence.  Our presenter has an extensive background in mediation and conflict resolution with young students, which is integrated into this seminar. Small group activities include video clips, roleplays, and simulations.  Candidates have opportunities to practice strategies in the seminar and then apply what they learn in their field placements.  Participating in these lessons and then practicing in their field placement helps candidates learn how to develop safe, inclusive positive learning environments that promote respect, value difference, and mediate conflicts according to state laws and local protocol.

Candidates are encouraged to participate in additional training in conflict resolution seminars are offered to learn peaceful mediation techniques.  The instructor also serves as consultant for implementing conflict resolution in a large number of our local schools. Many of our student teachers are trained as Mediator Mentors. These Mediator Mentors facilitate the training of young students in conflict resolution at the school sites.

Teacher candidates are required to attend the Conference on Character and Civic Education held each spring.  This event is co-sponsored by the Kremen School of Education and Human Development and the Bonner Center for Character Education.  During the conference, there are opportunities for teacher candidates to attend workshop sessions dealing with issues such as:  child abuse, mandated reporting, health and safety of students, and laws pertaining to teacher/student rights.  [ See Conference on Character and Civic Education Program 2010.]

Laws and principles related to student and parent rights, and student placements are examined in SPED 179: Differentiated Instruction and Classroom Management, a required course in the Multiple Subject Credential program, and in LEE 172: Cultural and Language Contexts of the Classroom. In both courses candidates are introduced to principles of effective communication with parents and the laws that govern special education and at-risk students ( SPED 179) and bilingual education placements ( LEE 172).  [See LEE 172 syllabus.]  SPED 179: Differentiated Instruction and Classroom Management holds discussions of reporting requirements related to child abuse and neglect and they are assessed through examination and reflection.  [See SPED 179 syllabus.]

Multiple Subject credential program candidates at Fresno examine principles of an effective learning environment in CI 171: Understanding the Learner, Instructional Design and Assessment as they examine models of instruction and classroom management through video and simulation activities. [See CI 171 syllabus.]  Candidates explore the California Standards for the Teaching Profession in relation to setting up and maintaining a supportive learning environment in LEE 177: Teaching Reading and the Arts in Grades K-3 and also in SPED 179: Differentiated Instruction and Classroom Management in relation to classroom management.

Candidates demonstrate their understanding of these principles and their ability to translate them into effective classroom practice in EHD 178: Field Study B: Grades K-3 and EHD 170: Field Study C Final Student Teaching.  University supervisors and master classroom teachers provide feedback to candidates as they implement and refine these strategies in their field placements.

During the Character and Civic Education Conference in spring semester each year teacher candidates for the Multiple Subject credential at Fresno State learn about conflict resolution issues as it relates to gang activity, suicide, etc.  In SPED 179: Differentiated Instruction and Classroom Management, teacher candidates explore several models of classroom management, which include interacting with difficult students and conflict resolution through video and active simulation activities.  Candidates must also develop and implement a Classroom Management Plan, which requires a positive learning environment, procedures, prevention strategies including defusing situations, plans for minor and major disruptions and crisis prevention.  [See SPED 179 syllabus.]

A Physical Education seminar reinforces the importance of physical health and provides teacher candidates with a variety of activities and lessons that can be used to support students in a healthy lifestyle. Teacher candidates participate in activities and are given additional resources to use with their students that meet California Content Standards for Physical Education and Health.

Candidates in the Multiple Subject Credential Early Childhood Education Program (ECE) are prepared to plan and deliver content-specific instruction consistent with state-adopted academic content standards for students and curriculum frameworks in the following major subject areas:  mathematics ( CI 176: Mathematics Instruction and Applied Assessment); science ( CI 175: Science Instruction and Applied Technology); history-social science ( LEE 173ECE: Teaching Literacy and English Language Development in Grades 4-8; LEE 148: Integrated Curriculum and EHD 174ECE: Field Study A: Grades 4-8 seminars); the visual and performing arts (LEE 148: Integrated Curriculum and EHD 178ECE: Field Study B: Grades K-3 seminars); and physical education and health ( LEE 148: Integrated Curriculum; EHD 170ECE: Final Student Teaching seminars as well as the undergraduate course Kinesiology 152: Physical Education for Children).

8A(a)  Mathematics.  During interrelated activities in program coursework and fieldwork, MS candidates learn specific teaching strategies that are effective in supporting them to teach the state-adopted academic content standards for students in mathematics (K-8). They enable students to understand basic mathematical computations, concepts, and symbols; to use these tools and processes to solve common problems; and to apply them to novel problems. They help students understand different mathematical topics and make connections among them. Candidates help students solve real-world problems using mathematical reasoning and concrete, verbal, symbolic, and graphic representations. They provide a secure environment for taking intellectual risks and approaching problems in multiple ways. Candidates model and encourage students to use multiple ways of approaching mathematical problems, and encourage discussion of different solution strategies. They foster positive attitudes toward mathematics, and encourage student curiosity, flexibility, and persistence in solving mathematical problems.

Candidates in the Multiple Subject credential program are required to take CI 176: Mathematics Instruction and Applied Assessment.  The course description from the core syllabus states, “This course is designed to prepare teacher candidates to plan instruction based on the assessment of students’ mathematical understanding and to teach mathematics using multiple strategies and methods in culturally and linguistically diverse elementary classrooms.”  This course was designed to help candidates to become confident, competent, creative, collaborative, resourceful mathematics education professionals who are knowledgeable about and skilled in designing, selecting, and implementing effective mathematics curricula, instructional methods, and assessment strategies to empower all students mathematically.

Competent mathematics instructors practice a collaborative model of student learning and provide leadership in mathematics instruction to teacher candidates so they may serve the entire diverse community of learners in the Central San Joaquin Valley.  In this course teacher candidates utilize the current national and state mathematics content standards and framework to analyze curriculum and assessments and plan lessons. They examine mathematics topics and sequencing, different strategies for solving problems, multiple representations, and connections to real world applications to prepare them to engage students in mathematical reasoning and promote positive attitudes toward mathematics.  [See CI 176 syllabus:  Primary Learning Outcomes.]

Through a series of active-learning experiences candidates acquire the knowledge to effectively examine mathematics concepts related to the requirements of the state-adopted mathematics content standards and frameworks.  In their EHD 178: Field Study B: Grades K-3 and EHD 170: Final Student Teaching placements, candidates practice and demonstrate their abilities to perform the Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs) expected in this curricular discipline. Teacher candidates have opportunities to apply spreadsheet technology (ex. Excel) to record, sort, and graph assessment data.  The results are analyzed in order to make instructional decisions. [See CI 176 syllabus: Mini Unit assignment.]   Candidates are observed in their student teaching placements, given feedback related to their teaching effectiveness and content knowledge and pedagogy and expected to continually refine their teaching approaches to ensure maximal effectiveness as well as their abilities to utilize assessment data to make instructional decisions.

8A(b) Science.During interrelated activities in program coursework and fieldwork, MS candidates learn specific teaching strategies that are effective in supporting them to teach the state-adopted academic content standards for students in science (K-8). They balance the focus of instruction between science information, concepts, and investigations. Their explanations, demonstrations, and class activities serve to illustrate science concepts and principles, scientific investigation, and experimentation.  Candidates emphasize the importance of accuracy, precision, and estimation.

Candidates in the Multiple Subject Credential program are required to take CI 175: Science Instruction and Applied Technology. The course description from the core syllabus states, “This course is designed to prepare teacher candidates to effectively and equitably teach elementary school science and to use contemporary instructional technologies in culturally and linguistically diverse classrooms.” [See CI 175 syllabus.]

Candidates for a Multiple Subject Teaching Credential demonstrate the ability to teach the state-adopted academic content standards for students in science through model lessons, presentations, and fieldwork. They examine specific strategies, teaching/instructional activities, procedures and experiences across multiple science topics in order to provide a balanced and comprehensive curriculum. They demonstrate the ability to incorporate appropriate software and technology resources to enhance science instruction. [See CI 175 syllabus:  Primary Learning Outcomes.]

Through a series of active-learning experiences, candidates acquired the knowledge to effectively examine science concepts related to the requirements of the state-adopted science content standards and frameworks.  In their EHD 178: Field Study B: Grades K-3 and EHD 170: Final Student Teaching placements, candidates practice and demonstrate their abilities to perform the Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs) expected in this curricular discipline. Teacher candidates have opportunities to apply spreadsheet technology (ex. Excel) to record, sort, and graph assessment data.  The results are analyzed in order to make instructional decisions.  Candidates are observed in their student teaching placements, given feedback related to their teaching effectiveness and content knowledge and pedagogy, and expected to continually refine their teaching approaches to ensure maximal effectiveness as well as their abilities to utilize technology as an effective instructional tool and to demonstrate Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) strategies when appropriate to the needs of their students.

Teacher candidates get the opportunity to demonstrate their science teaching skills during a Model Lesson Presentation in the class [See CI 175 syllabus:  Model Lesson Presentation.] and a science lesson during their field placement. [See EHD 178 syllabus.]  Their lessons include inquiry teaching with English learner and special needs target student accommodations.  The use of instructional technology is incorporated into the lesson.  Their explanations, demonstrations, and class activities serve to illustrate science concepts and principles, scientific investigation, and experimentation.

Candidates in EHD 178, and EHD 170, final student teaching are required to show evidence of effective teaching of science content standards. Evidence is documented in EHD 178 competencies and the EHD 170, final student teaching Holistic Proficiency Project. (See Multiple Subject Field Work Handbook and FAST Manual.)

8A(c) History-Social Science. During interrelated activities in program coursework and fieldwork, MS candidates learn specific teaching strategies that are effective in supporting them to teach the state-adopted academic content standards for students in history-social science (K-8). They enable students to learn and use basic analytic thinking skills in history and social science while attaining the state-adopted academic content standards for students. They use timelines and maps to give students a sense of temporal and spatial scale. Candidates teach students how social science concepts and themes provide insights into historical periods and cultures. They help students understand events and periods from multiple perspectives by using simulations, case studies, cultural artifacts, works of art and literature, cooperative projects, and student research activities.

Multiple Subject credential program candidates are required to take LEE 173:  Teaching Reading and Social Studies in Grades 4-8, in which they learn to teach state-adopted academic content standards for students in history/social sciences. In this course, candidates carefully examine the state-adopted content standards and frameworks and prepare a integrated unit of study that heavily emphasizes the importance of the history/social science content standards while helping students to learn and use basic analysis skills in history and social science through a sequenced series of lessons appropriate to students’ grade level placement. As a part of this examination of the content standards and the designing of the literacy/content area unit, teacher candidates experience strategies for enriching the study of history by applying social science concepts in the class simulation of case studies and cross-cultural activities, which they can then incorporate into their literacy/content area unit.  [See LEE 173 syllabus.]

Critical thinking and study skills are studied as a part of EHD 174: Field Study A: Grades 4-8, and required seminars, in which candidates prepare a content-based unit of study to teach literacy skills and critical thinking related to social science content reading materials.  Study skills are also addressed in several of the other content-specific pedagogy classes, including CI 176: Mathematics Instruction and Applied Assessment, CI 175: Science Instruction and Applied Technology, and LEE 177: Teaching Reading and the Arts in Grades K-3. The experiences included in the LEE 173: Teaching Reading and Social Studies in Grades 4-8 class utilize active forms of social studies learning, including simulations, debates, research activities, and cooperative projects. 

Multiple Subject credential program candidates demonstrate their ability to interrelate ideas and information within and across history/social science and other subject areas in the integrated unit of study they design in CI 171: Understanding the Learner, Instructional Design and Assessment [See CI 171 syllabus: Design for Instruction Assignment.] and in the lessons they teach in EHD 174: Field Study A: Grades 4-8 and EHD 170: Final Student Teaching. 

As part of EHD 174 fieldwork, candidates are required to participate in two History-Social Studies seminars. Fresno State partners with the Geographic Alliance (sponsored by National Geographic) for one three-hour seminar. The teacher candidates rotate through three different sessions that are taught by classroom teachers who have received training from the Geographic Alliance. The teacher candidates are engaged in hands on activities that provide ideas and resources for supporting them to teach state adopted academic content standards for students. They learn to use timelines and maps as tools to give students a sense of temporal and spatial scale. 

In the second EHD 174 social studies-history seminar candidates rotate through three different sessions that are taught by exemplary classroom teachers. These classroom teachers model and have the teacher candidates practice effective teaching by integrating concepts and themes which provide insights into historical periods and cultures. They help candidates understand events and periods from multiple perspectives by using simulations, case studies, cultural artifacts, works of art and literature, cooperative projects and students research activities. The teacher candidates also learn to use analytical thinking skills in history and social science. Immersing themselves in these activities helps candidates internalize strategies that will help them implement adopted academic content standards. Teacher candidates are required to demonstrate their understanding and apply what they learned in these seminars and their LEE 173 course by teaching a series of social studies lessons in their field placements. (See Multiple Subject Field Work Handbook.)

In LEE 173ECE, Teaching Literacy and English Language Development in Grades 4-8, candidates enrolled in the Multiple Subject Credential Early Childhood Education Program (ECE) are introduced to state-adopted academic content standards and frameworks in history/social science. In this course, candidates carefully examine the state-adopted content standards and frameworks and prepare a integrated unit of study that heavily emphasizes the importance of the history/social science content standards while helping students to learn and use basic analysis skills in history and social science through a sequenced series of lessons appropriate to students’ grade level placement.  Additional instruction in implementing a history/social science curriculum is provided in LEE 148, Integrated Curriculum, where students design a 10-lesson integrated content unit in history/social science or in science and implement their unit in a primary classroom in their EHD 178ECE fieldwork.  ECE candidates also attend Multiple Subject seminars in Phase 1 and design and implement a history/social science unit in their final student teaching placement (EHD170ECE).

8A(d) Visual and Performing Arts . During interrelated activities in program coursework and fieldwork, MS candidates learn specific teaching strategies that are effective in supporting them to teach the state-adopted academic content standards for students in visual and performing arts.  They guide students in achieving the goals of artistic perception; creative expression, understanding the cultural and historical origins of the arts; pursing meaning in the arts, and making informed judgments about the arts.  In the program, candidates learn to teach how various art forms relate to each other, other subject areas, and to careers.

Candidates take courses related to the visual and performing arts as part of their Liberal Studies program.  ART 179: Development of Artistic Expression, MUSIC 153: Children’s Music, DRAMA 137: Creative Dramatics, DRAMA 136:  Puppetry, and DANCE 160: Creative Movement for Children are offered as part of the Liberal Studies major.   In addition, IAS 108: Interdisciplinary Art Studies is required in the Liberal Studies major.  In LEE 177: Teaching Reading and the Arts in Grades K-3, candidates are required to integrate visual and performing arts activities into the integrated units of study they design.  Additional art teaching skills are taught in EHD 178: Field Study B: Grades K-3 seminars.  Candidates demonstrate their abilities to integrate visual and performing arts activities into the learning environment during their fieldwork placements.

Multiple Subject credential program candidates learn specific teaching strategies that are effective in achieving the goals of artistic perception and creative expression and understanding in relation to literacy in LEE 177: Teaching Reading and the Arts in Grades K-3, they are taught strategies for using drama, art, and music communicative process and as effective ways to increase and demonstrate reading comprehension. The cultural and historical origins of the arts are examined as part of activities in LEE 173: Teaching Reading and Social Studies in Grades   4-8 in relation to history/social science content standards but also as a viable means of historical study. Pursuing meaning in the arts and making informed judgments about the arts are a part of the curriculum as it relates to meeting the needs and fostering the talents of individuals in the LEE 177 class.  In the program, candidates learn to teach how various art forms relate to each other, other subject areas, and to careers through the exploration of individual learning styles, alternate methods of communication, and demonstrating understanding.

Since the arts are an integral part of human culture, history, and social interaction, as well as the fact that currently during the K-8 school day there is limited time to teach the arts as a stand-alone subject area, curriculum content in visual and performing arts is integrated with the other subject matter content areas, language arts, history/social science, mathematics, science, health, and physical education.  Examples of this integration of visual and performing arts in other content area courses and student teaching seminars includes: 

  • The use of Readers Theatre, puppet shows, and storytelling inLEE 173: Teaching Reading and Social Studies in Grades 4-8 and LEE 177: Teaching Reading and the Arts in K-3 , required reading courses.
  • Research into the art, music, and dance of specific cultures and historical time periods in LEE 177: Teaching Reading and Social Studies in Grades 4-8.
  • The use of a piece of visual art, either as the inspiration for the creation of a piece of writing or as a visual illustration of a piece of writing. The use of art as illustration of student written books covering all genres and media forms is taught inLEE 177: Teaching Reading & the Arts in K-3.
  • Movement to music, including a range of dance forms, is an integral part of physical education activities in Kinesiology 152: Physical Education for Children.
  • Recreating art in the style of different famous artists and illustrators after reading books about or illustrated by the artists is modeled inLEE 177: Teaching Reading and the Arts in K-3 , one of two required reading courses.  These lessons are among those most frequently replicated in student teaching assignments also. 

Credential candidates are encouraged to integrate arts and instruction whenever possible, to recognize the wide range of media available to allow students to express their understanding of concepts being taught, and celebrate the importance of multiple intelligences and the multiple ways of understanding and demonstrating understanding.

Although integration of the arts is included in LEE 173ECE, Teaching Literacy and English Language Development in Grades 4-8 and in LEE177ECE, Language and Literacy Development and Instruction, as a form of communication and as a means for developing both first and second language, the study of visual and performing art as described above is an important component of LEE 148, Integrated Curriculum.  Attention is given here to the “hundred languages of children” which are dominated by means of expression most commonly associated with the arts.

Visual and performing arts seminars are required as part ofEHD 178: Field Study B.  Fresno State partners with the Bonner Family Foundation in supporting the teaching of visual and performing art in the classroom. Our presenter has extensive knowledge and training in this area.  The two seminars are designed to help teacher candidates learn specific teaching strategies that are effective in supporting them to teach the state adopted academic content standards for visual arts. Artistic perception; creative expression, understanding the cultural and historical origins of arts; pursuing meaning in the arts, and making informed judgments about the arts are all modeled and practiced.

Teacher candidates participate in small group and whole group activities where they create their own art by drawing, painting, cutting and pasting as well as examining and analyzing of dance, music, theatre, and performance.  They learn how to integrate visual and performing arts with language arts.  These lessons serve as resources for teaching visual and performing arts with language arts in the classroom.  Candidates are required to demonstrate their understanding and apply what they learned by teaching performing and visual arts lessons in their field placements. (See Multiple Subject Field Work Handbook.) 

8A(e) Physical Education.  During interrelated activities in program coursework and fieldwork, MS candidates learn content-specific teaching strategies that are effective in supporting them to teach the state-adopted academic content standards for students in physical education.  They guide students in achieving the goals of the development of a variety of motor skills and abilities in students, developing student recognition of the importance of a healthy lifestyle, developing student knowledge of human movement, student knowledge of the rules and strategies of games and sports, and student self-confidence and self-worth in relation to physical education and recreation.

Students at Fresno State take Kinesiology 152: Physical Education for Children as a part of their undergraduate Liberal Studies major.  In this course, candidates learn and practice specific physical activities and approaches appropriate for children.  During the Multiple Subject pedagogy sequence, candidates are required to integrate physical education activities into their EHD 170: Final Student Teaching fieldwork experience.  Multiple Subject credential program candidates learn content-specific teaching strategies that are effective in achieving the goals of the development of a variety of motor skills and abilities in students in Kinesiology 152 and apply these strategies in their field placements. Candidates support student recognition of the importance of a healthy lifestyle, human movement, rules and strategies of games and sports, and student self-confidence and self-worth in relation to physical education and recreation in the teaching during their fieldwork experiences. 

Candidates in EHD 170:  Final Student Teaching are required to participate in a physical education seminar.  Two dynamic presenters keep the teacher candidates engaged for three hours by participating in a variety of games and activities that are effective in supporting them to teach the state-adopted academic content standards for students in physical education. This seminar guides students in achieving the goals of the development of a variety of motor skills and abilities in students, developing student recognition of the importance of a healthy lifestyle, developing student knowledge of human movement, student knowledge of the rules and strategies of games and sports, and student self confidence and self-worth in relation to physical education and recreation. Activities and games are modeled and then the candidates participate. Teacher candidates learn numerous ideas and resources to use in their classrooms.

8A(f) Health. During interrelated activities in program coursework and fieldwork, MS candidates learn content-specific teaching strategies that are effective in supporting them to teach the state-adopted academic content standards for students in Health. They guide students in achieving the goals of the acceptance of personal responsibility for lifelong health, respect for and promotion of the health of others, understanding of the process of growth and development, and informed use of health-related information, products, and services. In the program, candidates learn how to interrelate ideas and information within and across health science and other subject areas.

In EHD 170, Final Student Teaching, candidates learn content-specific teaching strategies that are effective in supporting them to teach the state-adopted academic content standards for students in health.  Our presenter, shows candidates where and how to access resources for teaching health.  Through the use of these resources the candidates can guide students in achieving the goals of the acceptance of personal responsibility for lifelong health, respect for and promotion of the health of others, understanding of growth and development, and informed use of health-related information, products, and services.  Candidates are encouraged to integrate ideas and information within and across health science and other subject areas.

The basic concepts and patterns of human growth and development are addressed in Kinesiology 152: Physical Education for Children; CI 171: Understanding the Learner, Instructional Design and Assessment; and SPED 179: Differentiated Instruction and Classroom Management.  These concepts are practiced in fieldwork placements ( EHD 174: Field Study A: Grades 4-8, EHD 178: Field Study B: Grades K-3, and EHD 170: Field Study C).

Intern Program Delivery Model:

The intern preservice component includes introductory preparation relative to Standard 8A: Pedagogical Preparation for Subject-Specific Content Instruction by Multiple Subject (MS) Candidates.

Teacher interns must demonstrate subject matter competency by successfully passing the CSET examination. During the Multiple Subject pedagogy sequence, candidates are required to integrate physical education activities into their EHD 160A and 160B courses (internship teaching assignment). They also participate in the required physical education seminar with the “traditional” student teachers. They are engaged in a variety of games and activities that are effective in supporting them to teach the state adopted academic content standards for students in physical education.

During interrelated activities in program coursework and fieldwork, intern candidates learn content specific teaching strategies that are effective in supporting them to teach state-adopted academic content standards in Health. They guide students in achieving the goals of the acceptance of personal responsibility for lifelong health, respect for and promotion of the health of others, understanding of the process of growth and development, and informed use of health-related information, products, and services. Candidates are encouraged to integrate ideas and information within and across science and other subject areas.

Back to Top