Standard 10: Preparation for Learning to Create a Supportive, Healthy Environment for Student Learning

In an ongoing manner beginning with an undergraduate course in growth and development, candidates are exposed on a variety of levels to training as to how personal, family, school, community, and environmental factors are related to students’ academic, physical, emotional, and social well-being.  In CI 171: Understanding the Learner, Instructional Design and Assessment and in required seminars, candidates learn about the implications of health and safety factors and the legal implications for students, their families, and teacher.  Through a series of planned seminars and conferences, candidates are offered a variety of information on dealing with nutrition, personal safety, health and hygiene as well as the resources available in the community for offering assistance and guidance to students and their families.

Through planned prerequisites and/or professional preparation, the teacher preparation program ensures the following:

Candidates are provided multiple opportunities to learn how personal, family, school, community, and environmental factors are related to students’ academic, physical, emotional, and social well-being.  Candidates have knowledge of diverse family structures, community cultures, and child rearing practices in order to develop respectful and productive relationships with families and communities.

The family structures and community values of diverse groups living in the Fresno State service area are explored in LEE 172: Cultural and Language Contexts of the Classroom.  [See LEE 172 syllabus.]  In SPED 179: Differentiated Instruction and Classroom Management, the teacher candidates examine family structure and culture as it relates to their views of disabilities and to the services available for students with special needs.  They reflect on a parent interview to expose and sensitize candidates to family perception to the IEP process and services. Teacher candidates are encouraged to take a “cultural plunge” where they interact in a cultural event of one of the diverse community cultures as one of the assignments in this course. Differences in child rearing practices are also examined, and simulation activities allowing candidates to practice cross-cultural communication to allow candidates practice in this skill before they are required to practice it in their fieldwork placements.  [See SPED 179 syllabus.]

Cross-cultural communication and the language and value challenges encountered are explored through video and class discussions in LEE 172: Cultural and Language Contexts of the Classroom. Guest speakers from diverse cultures in the Fresno State service area provide candidates multiple opportunities to interact with people of many cultures and to practice cross-cultural conversations. In SPED 179: Differentiated Instruction and Classroom Management candidates practice interactions that are productive and respectful of families during an in-class activity and through attendance at IEP meetings on-site. Parents, teachers, and service providers to students with disabilities share parent expectations for effective communication.

In EHD 170, Final Student Teachers are required to attend seminars in support of: Learning to Create a Supportive, Healthy Environment for Student Learning. The first seminar focuses on activities that help the candidates access community resources and agencies, in order to provide integrated support to meet the individual needs of each student, including social, health, educational, language services, and other resources.  Each candidate is given a resource guide produced by the Fresno Metro Ministry. Group work and scenarios are used to help the candidates become familiar with the resources. The Fresno Metro Ministry Resource Book is used in this seminar and also in their SPED 179 course.  The second presenter is from Child Protective Services. This presenter helps candidates become familiar with the legal responsibilities of teachers related to student health, safety, and the reporting requirements relating to child abuse. Their role as a mandated reporter responding to inappropriate and or violent behavior is reviewed.[See EHD 170 syllabus.]

A team of school nurses leads this three-hour seminar on creating a supportive, healthy environment for student learning. Candidates learn how decisions and common behaviors of children and adolescents can enhance or compromise their health and safety.  Candidates learn common chronic and communicable diseases of children and adolescents, and how to make referrals when these diseases are recognizable at school. The physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs, alcohol, drugs, and tobacco and of ways to identify, refer, and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional or social health problems. Candidates also learn effective strategies for encouraging the healthy nutrition of children and youth. The nurses show slides, video clips, give handouts, and have the candidates participate in group activities.

During the EHD 178 Field Placement, candidates participate in an interactive seminar where candidates learn to practice effective strategies and techniques for crisis prevention, conflict management, and resolution in ways that contribute to respectful, effective learning environments, including recognizing and defusing situations that may lead to student conflict or violence.  Our presenter has an extensive background in mediation and conflict resolution with young students which is integrated into this seminar. Small group activities include video clips, roleplays, and simulations.  Candidates have opportunities to practice strategies in the seminar and then apply what they learn in their field placements.  Participating in these lessons and then practicing in their field placement helps candidates learn how to develop safe, inclusive positive learning environments that promote respect, value difference, and mediate conflicts according to state laws and local protocol. 

Candidates are encouraged to participate in additional training in conflict resolution seminars are offered to learn peaceful mediation techniques.  The instructor also serves as consultant for implementing conflict resolution in a large number of our local schools. Many of our student teachers are trained as Mediator Mentors. These Mediator Mentors facilitate the training of young students in conflict resolution at the school sites.

Candidates have knowledge of major laws and principles that address student rights and parent rights pertaining to student placements. Candidates learn about the effects of student health, safety, and accident prevention on student learning.   Candidates study the legal responsibilities of teachers related to student health, safety, and the reporting requirements relating to child abuse and neglect.

Teacher candidates are required to attend the Conference on Character and Civic Education held each spring.  This event is co-sponsored by the Kremen School of Education and Human Development and the Bonner Center for Character Education.  During the conference, there are opportunities for teacher candidates to attend workshop sessions dealing with issues such as:  child abuse, mandated reporting, health and safety of students, and laws pertaining to teacher/student rights.  [ See Conference on Character and Civic Education Program 2010.]

Laws and principles related to student and parent rights, and student placements are examined in SPED 179: Differentiated Instruction and Classroom Management, a required course in the Multiple Subject Credential program, and in LEE 172: Cultural and Language Contexts of the Classroom. In both courses candidates are introduced to principles of effective communication with parents and the laws that govern special education and at-risk students ( SPED 179) and bilingual education placements ( LEE 172).  [See LEE 172 syllabus.]  SPED 179: Differentiated Instruction and Classroom Management holds discussions of reporting requirements related to child abuse and neglect and they are assessed through examination and reflection.  [See SPED 179 syllabus.]

Candidates have opportunities to learn and practice effective strategies and techniques for crisis prevention, conflict management, and resolution in ways that contribute to respectful, effective learning environments, including recognizing and defusing situations that may lead to student conflict or violence.

Multiple Subject credential program candidates at Fresno examine principles of an effective learning environment in CI 171: Understanding the Learner, Instructional Design and Assessment as they examine models of instruction and classroom management through video and simulation activities. [See CI 171 syllabus.]  Candidates explore the California Standards for the Teaching Profession in relation to setting up and maintaining a supportive learning environment in LEE 177: Teaching Reading and the Arts in Grades K-3 and also in SPED 179: Differentiated Instruction and Classroom Management in relation to classroom management.

Candidates demonstrate their understanding of these principles and their ability to translate them into effective classroom practice in EHD 178: Field Study B: Grades K-3 and EHD 170: Field Study C Final Student Teaching.  University supervisors and master classroom teachers provide feedback to candidates as they implement and refine these strategies in their field placements.

During the Character and Civic Education Conference in spring semester each year teacher candidates for the Multiple Subject credential at Fresno State learn about conflict resolution issues as it relates to gang activity, suicide, etc.  In SPED 179: Differentiated Instruction and Classroom Management, teacher candidates explore several models of classroom management, which include interacting with difficult students and conflict resolution through video and active simulation activities.

Candidates must also develop and implement a Classroom Management Plan which requires a positive learning environment, procedures, prevention strategies including defusing situations, plans for minor and major disruptions and crisis prevention.  [See SPED 179 syllabus.]

Candidates understand the effects of family involvement on teaching, learning and academic achievement, and candidates learn and apply skills for communicating and working constructively with students, their families and community members.

Principles of establishing and maintaining active parent involvement are addressed in CI 171: Understanding the Learner, Instructional Design and Assessment; LEE 173: Teaching Reading and Social Studies in Grades 4-8; and LEE 177: Teaching Reading and the Arts in Grades K-3, as they relate to research on effective schools and the cooperation needed to foster maximum student achievement.  The California Standards for the Teaching Profession are examined in these classes as well, and videos and simulation activities providing candidates with effective ways to obtain effective parent involvement are a part of the course activities in order to provide candidates with models for and practice in establishing cooperative relationships with parents. During Phase 3, instructors in SPED 179: Differentiated Instruction and Classroom Management examine families’ rights and involvement for their children identified with disabilities including pre-referral (RtI), the IEP process, at-risk/504 interventions, and IEP implementation and they are demonstrated through examination or reflection. [See SPED 179 syllabus.]

Candidates understand when and how to access site-based and community resources and agencies, in order to provide integrated support to meet the individual needs of each student, including social, health, educational, language services, and other resources.

Candidates are given the opportunity to examine the vast resources and support roles that families may assume during the LEE l72: Cultural and Language Contexts of the Classroom and SPED 179: Differentiated Instruction and Classroom Management courses.  Candidates also experience these interactions during their field placements as they attend and participate in school-based culture fairs, school-site parent meetings, professional learning communities, SST and/or IEP meetings, and parent conferences ( EHD 174: Field Study A: Grades 4-8, EHD 178: Field Study B: Grades K-3, and EHD 170: Field Study C Final Student Teaching).

Candidates for a Multiple Subject Credential at Fresno State have multiple opportunities to learn about and interact with a range of service and health related agencies in the service area. Through required attendance at the Civic Education Conference in the Spring of each year, candidates hear keynote speeches by national, regional, and community leaders in the service and health related fields and attend a series of conference presentations related to collaborative efforts between Fresno State and other helping disciples in the area such as social service, health services, professional ethics projects, and interdisciplinary collaboratives.  The Early Childhood Program has expanded on this standard by requiring candidates to enroll in a service learning class ( LEE 172ECE) in their first semester. This course requires candidates to volunteer fifteen hours in an agency or organization that provides assistance to children and families. [See LEE 172ECE-S syllabus.]

In SPED 179: Differentiated Instruction and Classroom Management, candidates are required to develop integrated supports, including resources, to meet the individual need of their students through the Differentiated Instruction and Environment Report, the Learning Group Presentation, and the final. They also are required to attend and contribute to a Student Study Team meeting that identifies resources at the school.  [See SPED 179 syllabus.] Seminars in EHD 170: Field Study C promotes healthy lifestyles.  Many of the schools in which our student teachers are placed have on-site health and human service centers, and the student teachers are included in the referral and parent conferencing aspect of obtaining these services for their students and families. The partnership schools cohort programs meet at a specific school site, and the candidates are all actively involved in volunteer activities related to health and human services at the site. For example, the candidates may volunteer for Saturday activities such as school blood drives, literacy Saturdays, etc.

Candidates learn how decisions and common behaviors of children and adolescents can enhance or compromise their health and safety.  Candidates learn common chronic and communicable diseases of children and adolescents, and how to make referrals when these diseases are recognizable at school.  Candidates learn effective strategies for encouraging the healthy nutrition of children and youth.

Studies on student health and its impact on learning are explored in CI 171: Understanding the Learner, Instructional Design and Assessment.  Physical growth and development, nutrition, and exercise issues are examined in Kinesiology 152: Physical Education for Children and also in CI 171. [See CI 171 syllabus: Case Study.]  SPED 179: Differentiated Instruction and Classroom Management addresses students with health impairments and their safety.  At-risk youth and behaviors that can compromise health and safety are also addressed in SPED 179: Differentiated Instruction and Classroom Management. The inclusion of health education into integrated units of study is required for lesson planning in the candidates’ field placements: EHD 178: Field Study B: Grades K-3 and EHD 170: Field Study C Final Student Teaching.

A team of school nurses leads this three-hour seminar on creating a supportive, healthy environment for student learning. Candidates learn how decisions and common behaviors of children and adolescents can enhance or compromise their health and safety.  Candidates learn common chronic and communicable diseases of children and adolescents, and how to make referrals when these diseases are recognizable at school. The physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs, alcohol, drugs, and tobacco and of ways to identify, refer, and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional or social health problems. Candidates also learn effective strategies for encouraging the healthy nutrition of children and youth. The nurses show slides, video clips, give handouts, and have the candidates participate in group activities.

Candidates have knowledge and understanding of the physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs and tobacco and of ways to identify, refer, and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional or social health problems.

Candidates for the Multiple Subject credential take CFS 39: Introduction to Child and Adolescent Development as part of the Liberal Studies major. This course offers a balanced study of basic theories, research, application, and principles of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development.

Teacher candidates participate in the Character and Civic Education Conference in the spring semester each year.  Multiple workshop sessions are offered to assist teacher candidates in understanding the physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs, and tobacco and of ways to identify, refer and support students and their families.

In CI 171: Understanding the Learner, Instructional Design and Assessment, candidates learn ways to identify, refer, and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional, or social health problems. [See CI 171 syllabus:  Case Study Assignment.]  In SPED 179: Differentiated Instruction and Classroom Management, through class discussion and quizzes teacher candidates demonstrate knowledge of the risks and effects of alcohol, tobacco and drug use on families and are provided with support and referral information.

During EHD 170: Field Study C, candidates are presented with a seminar presented by a team of school nurses leads this three-hour seminar on creating a supportive, healthy environment for student learning. Candidates learn how decisions and common behaviors of children and adolescents can enhance or compromise their health and safety.  Candidates learn common chronic and communicable diseases of children and adolescents, and how to make referrals when these diseases are recognizable at school. The physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs, alcohol, drugs, and tobacco and of ways to identify, refer, and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional or social health problems. Candidates also learn effective strategies for encouraging the healthy nutrition of children and youth. The nurses show slides, video clips, give handouts, and have the candidates participate in group activities. They will learn to recognize symptoms, discourage harmful behaviors (e.g. drug use), encourage healthy behaviors (e.g. fitness for life), and how and why to make referrals.  [See EHD 170 syllabus.]

Candidates complete infant, child and adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certification that meets the criteria of the American Heart Association or the American Red Cross.

During the Multiple Subject orientation teacher candidates are informed that they must complete CPR certification within one year of applying for their Preliminary Multiple Subject teaching credential.

 Back to Top