Section One: Response to Standards

Category A: Program Design, Governance, and Qualities

Standard 1: Program Design

The Multiple Subject Credential Program at California State University, Fresno and its prerequisites include a purposeful, interrelated, developmentally designed sequence of coursework and field experiences that effectively prepares candidates to teach all K-12 students and understand the contemporary conditions of schooling. The Liberal Studies undergraduate major prepares students with subject matter competency.  Individuals demonstrate subject matter competency by passing all sections of the California Subject Examinations for Teachers (CSET).  A prerequisite class is required of all candidates before they are admitted to the program. Teacher candidates must complete EHD 50: Introduction to Teaching before they are admitted.

The sequenced design of the program is based on a clearly stated rationale that requires candidates to complete foundational classes and basic content-specific pedagogy coursework while concurrently practicing the application of these concepts and teaching skills in a field placement setting that is aligned with the reading class in which they are enrolled. Candidates in primary grade placements are concurrently enrolled in LEE 177: Teaching Reading and the Arts in K-3. Candidates in 4-8 grade placements are enrolled in LEE 173: Teaching Reading and Social Studies in Grades 4-8.  The candidates can request a primary or intermediate placement for EHD 170, final student teaching. Candidates are carefully observed, monitored, and advised during their 2nd and 3rd phase field placements so that they receive constructive feedback in regard to their growing teaching competence, and Master Teachers and supervisors provide regular feedback as to their progress toward the achievement of Teaching Performance Expectations. (See FAST Handbook:  TPE Matrix.)(See Multiple Subject Handbook.)

Candidates are expected to apply the theoretical and scholarly concepts, knowledge, and teaching skills in planning and implementing effective and appropriate lessons and units of study.  By design, the program provides extensive opportunities for candidates to learn to teach the content of the state adopted K-12 academic content standards to all students.  All content-specific courses are based on the CCTC Standards and the state-adopted content standards and frameworks.   CI 171: Understanding the Learner, Instructional Design, and Assessment; LEE 172: Cultural and Language Contexts of the Classroom; LEE 173: Teaching Reading and Social Studies in Grades 4-8; CI 175: Science Instruction and Applied Technology; CI 176: Mathematics Instruction and Applied Assessment; LEE 177: Teaching Reading and the Arts in K-3; and SPED 179:  Differentiated Instruction and Classroom Management are all required of Multiple Subject Credential candidates.

Candidates learn to use state-adopted instructional materials, assess student progress, and apply these understandings in teaching K-12 students as related to the content of the pedagogy coursework and to practice this knowledge in their field placements.  In their initial fieldwork ( EHD 174 and EHD 178) and, eventually, in their EHD 170:  Final Student Teaching, candidates are expected to develop and demonstrate pedagogical competence as defined by the Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs).  In addition, candidates are given constructive feedback through lesson observations, mid semester and final goal setting/assessment meetings, responses to reflective journals, and course competencies throughout all of the student teaching placements. This enables them to practice and refine their teaching performance in preparation for the performance assessments. Candidates gradually move toward this goal through the required sequenced experiences.

The Multiple Subject Credential Early Childhood Education Program (ECE) has adapted the scope and sequence of the general Multiple Subject credential program to provide a comprehensive K-8 teacher preparation program while, in addition, expanding theory and practice to include the education of children from birth through preschool and a focus on grades K-3 These adaptations have allowed the ECE program to continue to meet the national recognition requirements of the National Association of the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) while meeting the accreditation requirements of the CCTC.

Coursework and fieldwork for Multiple Subject Credential candidates choosing to enroll in the ECE Program pathway include: Psychological Contexts of Teaching and Learning ( CI171ECE); Cultural Contexts of Teaching and Learning ( LEE172ECE-S); Teaching Literacy and English Language Development in Grades 4-8  ( LEE173ECE); Mathematics Instruction and Applied Assessment ( CI176); Field Study A-ECE ( EHD174ECE); Science Instruction and Applied Technology ( CI175); Language and Literacy Development and Instruction ( LEE177ECE); Integrated Curriculum ( LEE 148); Managing Early Learning Environments ( CI150ECE); Field Study B-ECE ( EHD178ECE); Teaching Students with Special Needs in General Education Settings ( SPED120); and Field Study C-ECE ( EHD170ECE) .

The preliminary teacher preparation program and its prerequisites include a purposeful, interrelated, developmentally-designed sequence of coursework and field experiences, as well as a planned process for comprehensive assessment of candidates that effectively prepare candidates to teach all K-12 students and to understand the contemporary conditions of schooling, including attention to California public education.

The sequence of course/fieldwork for the California State University, Fresno, Multiple Subject program includes the following:

Prerequisite:  EHD 50 – Introduction to Teaching

Courses

 

Units

PHASE 1

 

 

CI 171

Understanding the Learner, Instructional Design & Assessment

3

LEE 172

Cultural and Language Contexts of the Classroom

3

LEE 173

Teaching Reading and Social Studies in Grades 4-8

3

EHD 174

Field Study A: Grades 4-8

2

 

 

 

PHASE 2

 

 

CI 175

Science Instruction and Applied Technology

3

CI 176

Mathematics Instruction and Applied Assessment

3

LEE 177

Teaching Reading and the Arts in K-3

3

EHD 178

Field Study B: Grades K-3

2

 

 

 

PHASE 3

 

 

SPED 179

Differentiated Instruction and Classroom

3

EHD 170

Field Study C: Final Student Teaching

9

Total Units for Multiple Subject Preliminary

34

The sequence of the professional preparation coursework permits the candidate to begin an incremental and developmental series of activities, which prepare him/her for full day teaching responsibilities. The Multiple Subject Field Work Handbook  (See Multiple Subject Handbook.) specifically lists the competencies expected for all fieldwork experiences, including suggested timelines. Candidates begin the process by initially observing a variety of teaching situations and activities such as different classroom organizational patterns, content area assignments and the context of classrooms. This includes settings with diverse student populations.  The candidate then moves on to engaging in small instructional group activities in EHD 174: Field Study A: Grades 4-8 fieldwork. These include working with students one to one and small group instruction.  In EHD 178:  Field Study B:  Grades K-3, teacher candidates begin to plan and teach lessons to both small groups of students and also whole class instruction.  In Field Study C, ( EHD 170: Final Student Teaching), the candidate gradually assumes all classroom preparation and teaching responsibilities (i.e. planning management, diagnosis and prescription, assessment of student learning, record keeping, etc.). These activities are based on graduated comprehension and complexity.

The Multiple Subject Credential Early Childhood Education Program (ECE) also provides a sequence of professional preparation activities that extend theory to practice and allow for assessment of candidate performance.  Additionally, ECE candidates in the first two phases of their pre-service preparation are required to spend ten hours in service learning in a community environment that provides support to children and families [See LEE172ECE syllabus.]; to explore a culture other than their own [See LEE172ECE syllabus.]; to plan, teach and document a unit of study for infants, toddlers, or preschool aged children in a supervised setting

[See LEE 148 syllabus.]; and to plan, teach, and document a 10-lesson standards-driven science or social studies unit in a primary classroom in a public school. [See LEE 148 syllabus.]

Prerequisite:  EHD 50 – Introduction to Teaching

Courses

 

Units

PHASE 1

 

 

CI 171ECE

Psychological Contexts of Teaching and Learning

3

LEE 172ECE-S

Cultural Contexts of Teaching and Learning

3

LEE 173ECE

Teaching Literacy and English Language Development in Grades 4-8

3

CI 176

Mathematics Instruction and Applied Assessment

3

EHD 174ECE

Field Study A-ECE

2

 

 

 

PHASE 2

 

 

CI 175

Science Instruction and Applied Technology

3

LEE 177ECE

Language and Literacy Development and Instruction

3

LEE 148

Integrated Curriculum

3

CI150ECE

Managing Early Learning Environments

1

EHD 178ECE

FieldStudy B-ECE

2

 

 

 

PHASE 3

 

 

SPED 120

Students with Special Needs in General Education Settings

3

EHD 170ECE

Field Study C: Final Student Teaching

9

Total Units for Multiple Subject Preliminary Credential: ECE Option

38

The sequenced design of the program is based on a clearly stated rationale that has a sound theoretical and scholarly foundation anchored to the knowledge base of teacher education and informed by adult learning theory and research.

Based on a shared vision, the Multiple Subject Credential program faculty believe that the purpose of K-12 schooling is: to foster values that support life in a democratic and diverse society; to assist students in developing the knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed for successful functioning in a changing, complex, and increasingly interdependent world; to produce students who value learning and have the skills to continue learning throughout their lives; and to develop the unique potential of every student.  The dispositional characteristics encouraged in our programs are collaboration, valuing diversity, critical thinking, ethical professionalism, reflective practice, and life-long learning.

The school’s purpose and teachings are based on current educational philosophy, educational practice, and pedagogical and sociological theory and research.  In addition to the common knowledge base shared by faculty in the preliminary credential programs, each program has its own guiding core of specific professional knowledge.  The intent is to build a solid foundation in teacher candidates for interpreting conflicting ideas about the purpose of schools and the role of teachers. This includes communication of beliefs and implications for curriculum and instruction throughout coursework, as well as in laboratory, clinical, and field experiences.

The credential program focuses not only on the acquisition of knowledge but also on the application of that knowledge to teaching practice.  The program is the "underpinning" of teacher preparation and helps to answer the question of what to teach, how to teach it, and why teach it.  Coursework and field experiences include emphasis on the work of educational theorists and researchers such as Dewey, Bruner, Goodlad, Piaget, Vygotsky, Garner, Krashen, Cummins, and others. The knowledge base that best reflects these theorists’ work is one of continuous inquiry and reflection, effective strategies with diverse student populations, theoretically sound instructional practices, and approaches to meet the changing needs of the children with whom our teacher candidates will work.  These beliefs provide the basis upon which the program is established.

The Multiple Subject Credential Early Childhood Education Program’s knowledge base includes the work of educational theorists and researchers listed above. The knowledge base is expanded to include the work of experts in early childhood development, learning, and education. Additional sources of the ECE program’s underlying philosophy include Maslow, Erikson, Kohlberg, Rest, Bruner, Hall, Cortes, Banks, Nieto, Good, Brophy, Gartrell, Posner, Lickona, Rest, Bebeau, Thomas, Narvaez, Bredekamp, Gandini, Forman, and Katz.

By design, the program provides extensive opportunities for candidates  (a) to learn to teach the content of the state adopted K-12 academic content standards to all students; to use state-adopted instructional materials, to assess student progress, and to apply these understandings in teaching K-12 students; (b) to know and understand the foundations of education and the functions of schools in society; and (c) to develop pedagogical competence utilizing a variety of strategies as defined by the Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs) (provided in the appendix).

The preparation of candidates at Fresno State begins with general education, consisting of 52-53 units of “core,” “breadth,” and “interdisciplinary” courses. Core courses are designed to teach students “to read critically, communicate effectively and think clearly.” Breadth courses expose “students to a variety of disciplines within a structural framework that develops knowledge and skills representative of all areas of human endeavor.” Interdisciplinary courses provide “an interdisciplinary experience at the upper-division level in which the skills and knowledge developed in core and breadth are integrated, bringing their interrelationships into focus.”

The subject matter competency requirements for teaching in elementary schools are addressed in the Liberal Studies degree program (this 135 unit degree program has been submitted to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing and includes coursework in all areas required to meet the subject matter competence requirements) and through the passage of the California Subject Examinations for Teachers (CSET exams).  All candidates for the Multiple Subject Credential are required to certify subject-matter competence in multiple subjects prior to final student teaching.  Candidates must meet these requirements through passing all three subtests of the Multiple Subject CSET.  Teacher candidates who have earned their bachelor’s degree must meet the competence upon admission. Teacher candidates in the Blended/Integrated program must meet competence prior to final student teaching.

The state adopted standards are taught and utilized in each course in the program. In the professional preparation sequence, candidates are required to take a mathematics methods class ( CI 176).  Social Science is the discipline used in teaching reading LEE 173), which all candidates are required to take.  They must also take a science methods and applied technology class ( CI 175).  Reading and communication skills are addressed in LEE 177: Teaching Reading and the Arts in K–3 and LEE 173: Teaching Reading and Social Studies in Grades 4–8. Subject matter content standards are integrated and taught within each of the methodology classes. [See syllabi for CI 171, 175, 176; LEE 172, 173, 177; and SPED 179.]  These standards are utilized in lesson planning and delivery in field experiences in EHD 174: Field Study A: Grades 4-8, EHD 178: Field Study B: Grades K-3, and EHD 170: Field Study C:  Final Student Teaching. (See Multiple Subject Handbook)

In the professional education preparation program, the standards and frameworks are used in the general methods course ( CI 171: Understanding the Learner, Instructional Design and Assessment) as teacher candidates practice writing objectives and developing lesson plans. [See CI 171 syllabus:  Design for Instruction Assignment.]  The methods courses ( CI 175, CI 176, LEE 173, and LEE 177) provide a thorough examination of the California standards and/or frameworks. During EHD 170:  Final Student Teaching, teacher candidates develop a Teaching Project with required planning, lessons, and assessment utilizing state standards.

Candidates enrolled in the Multiple Subject Credential Early Childhood Education Program are exposed throughout their training to California’s standards-driven system in the ECE-equivalent courses to those listed for the general Multiple Subject Credential Program.  In addition to their exposure to grade-level academic standards in all methods courses and requirements to design instruction based on grade-level standards in every fieldwork placement, candidates gain knowledge and experience relative to the other critical components of the State’s system: assessment, professional development, intervention, school climate, interagency collaboration, etc.  Relative to experience in designing preschool curriculum, ECE candidates are exposed to delivery models such as High Scope, Montessori, and Reggio Emilia, to curricular recommendations provided by the NAEYC, and to preschool standards such as California’s Desired Results.  [See LEE 148 syllabus.]

The Kremen School of Education and Human Development has worked to coordinate the Multiple Subject credential program with the Liberal Studies Blended Program.  Some Multiple Subject candidates major in Liberal Studies prior to entry into the credential program.  The Liberal Studies major is the preferred undergraduate studies for Multiple Subject Credential candidates. The program is offered in full compliance with the Standards of Program Quality and Effectiveness for the Subject Matter Requirement for the Multiple Subject Teaching Credential standards and guidelines of the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. 

The Liberal Studies Program is administered by a coordinator with support from two staff advisers.  It is one of the largest single majors in the university. Currently, over 1400 students are enrolled in the major. The program is guided by a Liberal Studies Review Committee of faculty that represents 33 different academic departments from all eight schools in the University.  Because of the collaborative relationship between the KSOEHD and other schools, teacher preparation is truly an all-university endeavor.

The knowledge base for the preliminary programs is divided into six major components:

  • Philosophy:  Core Values and Beliefs
  • Mission Statement and Goals
  • Knowledge Base
  • Design and Content of Curriculum
  • Outcomes, Assessment, and Evaluation
  • Collaboration with Professional Community

In this model, all phases of the professional preparation contains a field experience, which is closely linked to coursework throughout the program.  Initial experiences include acquisition of knowledge in coursework, observations in the classroom, planning instruction while acquiring pedagogical skills and decision making, application of knowledge and skills with small and large groups of students in the classroom, and final assumption of classroom responsibility in a variety of diverse settings.

The fifth-year Multiple Subject program is designed with the adult learner in mind, offering a variety of options within the program design, such as day and/or night classes, weekend classes, cohorts, and full-time or part-time schedules.  Our education faculty is grounded in learning theory relative to how children and adults learn (Bransford, Brown, & Cocking, 2000; Brookfield, 1995; Darling-Hammond & Bransford, 2005).  Therefore, the pedagogy of our classrooms contain short lecture, small group discussions, cooperative learning exercises, discovery learning, modeling, student presentations, videos, and computers.  Faculty utilizes dialogue, participation, and a problem-solving approach to engage our adult teacher candidates and encourage them to take control of their own learning.  Prior knowledge of learners is important with children as well as adults; therefore, faculty model that in our curricula (Brookfield, 1995).

Knowing that adults tend to be concerned with practical application (Knowles, 1980, 1990; Lawler, 1991, Jarvis, 1995) and less with theory, faculty tie theory to practice on a regular basis, an important component for teacher preparation (Darling-Hammond & Bransford, 2005).  For example, field experiences are required for each phase of the program and are linked specifically to course content.  All courses are linked to a field experience.  Teacher candidates have assignments where they learn theory in their university class and apply their knowledge in field competencies.

Critical reflection and self-awareness is an important aspect of adult learning (Brookfield, 1995; Smith, 1990) and has a major emphasis in our curriculum.  In many classes, teacher candidates are expected to keep reflective journals about their own learning.  This supports the reflective process continued in the induction program and supports a lifelong learning process.

References:

Bransford, J. D., Brown, A. L., & Cocking, R. R. (Eds.). (2000). How people learn: Brain, mind, experience, and school. Washington DC: National Academy Press.

Brookfield, S. D. (1995).  Becoming a critically reflective teacher.   San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Brookfield, S. (1990).  The skillful teacher.  San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Brookfield, S.D. (1986). Understanding and facilitating adult learning. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Chickering, A., Lynch, A., & Schlossberg, N. (1989).  Improving higher education environments for adults. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Darling-Hammond, L., & Bransford, J. (Eds.). (2005). Preparing teachers for a changing world: What teachers should learn and be able to do. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Jarvis, P. (1995). Adult and continuing education: Theory and practice. (2nd edition). New York: Routledge.

Joyce, B., Weil, M., & Calhoun, E. (2009). Models of teaching.  Pearson Allyn & Bacon.

King, P. M., & Kitchener, K.S. (1994). Developing reflective judgment: Understanding and promoting intellectual growth and critical thinking in adolescents and adults. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Knowles, M. (1990). The making of an adult educator: An autobiographical journey. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Knowles, M. (1980). The modern practice of adult education (Ed.).  Chicago: Follett.

Lawler, P. (1991). The keys to adult learning: Theory and practical strategies. Philadelphia: Research for Better Schools.

Merriam, S.B., & Brockett, R.G. (1997).  The profession and practice of adult education: An introduction. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Smith, R.M. (1990). (Ed.), Learning to learn across the lifespan. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

A fair, valid, and reliable assessment of the candidate’s status with respect to the TPEs is embedded in the program design.

The Multiple Subject Credential Program was designed specifically as a treatment-assessment system wherein candidates are taught TPE-related knowledge and skills, are formatively evaluated, are provided remediation if necessary, then summatively evaluated for mastery of TPE knowledge and skills at a beginning teacher level. In all courses and field assignments, candidates receive systematic feedback, including feedback regarding their TPE-related performance, through identified formative assessments and other coursework-embedded assignments, and from fieldwork Master Teachers and university supervisors by way of class observations, competency feedback, and required goal setting/assessment meetings [See Multiple Subject Overview Matrix, FAST Manual: TPE Matrix, & Multiple Subject Handbook].  At the summative level, candidates must pass specific FAST tasks (referred to as projects) that are embedded into their fieldwork in order to receive credit for that fieldwork and to move to the next phase of pre-service training. [See FAST Manual: TPE Matrix.]  FAST has been approved by the CCTC as a fair, valid, and reliable assessment system and has been fully implemented as an approved system since July 1, 2008. 

When a candidate enrolls in the final student teaching experience, prompt and systematic feedback is again provided by both the master teacher and university supervisor.  Teacher candidates keep journals where reflectivity is encouragedand the university supervisor and/or master teacher has an opportunity to respond.  Master Teachers are the primary role models for the student teacher, but university supervisors also provide demonstration lessons in some of the programs.

Systematic assessment of candidates for readiness to assume daily teaching responsibilities is done by the master teacher and university supervisor.  This is an on-going process and culminates with a final assessment.  The Supervisors Manual [See Supervisor Manual.] for Multiple Subject provides a systematic process for regular visitations and feedback. University supervisors in EHD 170 are expected to visit the classroom a minimum of eight times per semester and complete five formal observations of student teachers. Triad conferences are held with the student teacher, university supervisor, and master teacher to document the mid-semester progress and final evaluation.  In the event that serious corrective action is needed, a specific procedure is outlined in the Supervisor Manual and the Multiple Subject Field Work Handbook whereby joint conferences and documentation are required.

Integrated/Blended Program Delivery Model:

An Integrated/Blended Program of Undergraduate Teacher Preparation provides candidates with:

  • a carefully designed curriculum involving both subject matter and professional preparation that includes integrated and concurrent coursework of subject matter and related pedagogy at gradually more sophisticated levels
  • a clearly developmental emphasis involving early and continuous advising, and early field experiences
  • explicit and supported mechanisms for collaboration among all involved in the design, leadership, and ongoing delivery of the program

The Liberal Studies Blended Program has a carefully designed curriculum involving both subject matter and related pedagogy at gradually more sophisticated levels.  [See Liberal Studies Blended Program Matrix.] The primary mission of the Liberal Studies Blended Program is to provide a strong knowledge-based education in the liberal arts that will provide subject matter preparation for elementary teaching, and an opportunity to complete the Multiple Subject or Education Specialist Credential Program requirements all within a four-year period.  The aim is to develop in students an appreciation and understanding of the arts, the sciences, the humanities and the various cultures that compose the area serviced by California State University, Fresno.  A study of the liberal arts teaches ways of thinking, exploring, understanding, and seeing the world from the perspective of others.  The Blended Program offers a flexible program for students who want to obtain broad knowledge through studying a variety of subjects blended in three elements of the degree—the General Education Program, the courses required in the Liberal Studies major, and the courses required for teacher preparation.

The Multiple Subject Credential program can be completed during the junior and senior years of the Liberal Studies Blended program and includes the following sequence of courses:

Prerequisite:  EHD 50 – Introduction to Teaching

Courses

 

Units

PHASE 1

 

 

CI 171

Understanding the Learner, Instructional Design & Assessment

3

LEE 172

Cultural and Language Contexts of the Classroom

3

LEE 173

Teaching Reading and Social Studies in Grades 4-8

3

EHD 174

Field Study A: Grades 4-8

2

 

 

 

PHASE 2

 

 

CI 175

Science Instruction and Applied Technology

3

CI 176

Mathematics Instruction and Applied Assessment

3

LEE 177

Teaching Reading and the Arts in K-3

3

EHD 178

Field Study B: Grades K-3

2

 

 

 

PHASE 3

 

 

SPED 179

Differentiated Instruction and Classroom

3

EHD 170

Field Study C: Final Student Teaching

9

Total Units for Multiple Subject Preliminary

34

Prior to beginning the teacher education program, teacher candidates take a pre-professional field experience course (EHD 50: Introduction to Teaching) or secure an approved waiver based on classroom observations, experience, and assignments in which they observe school sites. The Multiple Subject credential candidates engage in on-going field experiences throughout their professional preparation. In each phase of the program, teacher candidates have field experiences in student teaching ( EHD 174: Field Study A: Grades 4-8; EHD 178: Field Study B: Grades K-3; and EHD 170: Field Study C:  Final Student Teaching) that are taken concurrently with the professional preparation courses where competencies are developmental in nature.  The required fieldwork competencies are linked to course requirements to ensure the link between theory and the world of practice.  For example, the educational psychology theory and curriculum pedagogy are directly applicable to planned field experiences with stipulated performance tasks.  All coursework in professional preparation immediately immerses the candidate with the world of practice. (See Multiple Subject Handbook for competencies listings)

The professional coursework taken by the Multiple Subject Credential teacher candidates directly parallels field experiences in classrooms that represent a culturally, ethnically, or socio-economically diverse student population.  The current demographics in the service area where candidates engage in field experiences reflect 100 different language groups with the largest Hmong student population in the nation. To better address the tremendous social, economic, cultural, and developmental diversity that exists in our classrooms today, student teachers need many diverse teaching experiences.  Accordingly, during the student teaching experiences, candidates will be placed in at least two different grades and socio-economic levels. Student teachers will also be afforded the opportunity to prepare and use instructional strategies, activities, and materials that are appropriate for students with diverse needs, interests, and developmental levels.

Within the Multiple Subject credential at Fresno State, several alternative routes are provided for candidates with teaching experience, second career candidates, and specialty areas of study

(i.e. Communicative Disorders).  These candidates normally seek to complete their Multiple Subject Credential by enrolling in the following options: 

  • General Program: Teacher candidates take courses in the program as described above either at the university or on designated school sites.
  • Partnerships: Partnership schools are a collaborative, experiential, site-based program featuring a team of professors and supervisors who coordinate coursework and field experiences to connect theory to practice and provide an enriched, practical program.  For example, a cohort of teacher candidates currently attends all classes on the school sites in Central Unified School District, Fresno Unified School District and Sanger Unified School District.  Incorporated into the program are numerous realistic, hands-on experiences, including workshops, seminars, professional learning communities and demonstration lessons provided by classroom teachers at the school sites.  Student teaching takes place primarily at the partnership sites or at schools in the surrounding area.
  • Early Childhood Education Option: The ECE Program provides an expanded knowledge base, experience working with preschool aged children, and a focus on teaching in grades K-3. The 38-unit ECE cohort program is compatible with both the Dual Program and the Internship Program.
  • Dual: This program is designed to support teacher candidates who are earning their Multiple Subject and their Education Specialist credential concurrently. These teacher candidates may be part of a cohort that is in either the university-based courses or the partnership schools. Courses required for the Education Specialist are spread throughout the phases, and specialized fieldwork courses and settings are arranged for the teacher candidates to have an inclusive experience.
  • Communicative Disorders(Multiple Subject): The Communicative Disorders program is designed for students who wish to prepare for specialization in special education, with an emphasis on teaching children with hearing impairments.
  • Teacher Internships(Multiple Subject Credential): Teacher candidates are employed by a school district while also enrolled in a sequenced professional preparation course of study. A Teacher Internship Program Handbook includes expectations and roles of interns and personnel working with interns. The Multiple Subject Student Teaching Handbook includes the Teacher Internship roles and responsibilities. (See Multiple Subject Handbook.)

Each candidate is informed of the expected mastery of program competencies at program orientation and through syllabi presented by faculty at the beginning of each course.  The required fieldwork is linked to course competencies related to experiences aligned with the teaching performance assessment and based in the field experience competencies. These are described in the Student Teaching Handbook, which is distributed to all candidates, Master Teachers, and university supervisors. Candidates’ knowledge of the California Standards for the Teaching Profession, professional content, and their ability to design effective learning environments and instruction for all children is systematically assessed through performance assessment and teacher work sampling. [See course syllabi and Multiple Subject Handbook.]

Candidates in the Multiple Subject Credential Early Childhood Education Program (ECE) receive feedback, including TPE-related formative assessment, in much the same way as that described for the general Multiple Subject Program. [See Multiple Subject ECE Program Overview Matrix.]  Additionally, ECE candidates are required to show competence relative to five standards required by the National Association of the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) for national recognition: Promoting child development and learning’ building family and community relationships; observing, documenting and assessing to support young children and families; teaching and learning; and becoming a professional.  Although FAST provides an excellent assessment of the majority of these NAEYC Standards, ECE candidates are required to show mastery on three additional summative assessments — the Child and Family Assessment [See CI 171ECE syllabus.]; Assessing Professional Dispositions [See EHD170ECE syllabus.]; and The Preschool Project. [See LEE 148 syllabus.]

Intern Program Delivery Model:

The intern program is a partnership between the preparation program and the employing school district.  In an intern delivery model, the preparation program integrates theory and practice as appropriate for teachers of record. Each internship program includes a preservice component (providing skills and knowledge required prior to entering the classroom as the teacher of record) delivered in a sustained, intensive and classroom-focused manner, which includes introductory preparation relative to Standards 4, 7, 8, 11, 12, and 13.  The remaining content and fieldwork builds on the preservice experiences and addresses all Commission-adopted standards. The partners jointly provide intensive supervision that consists of structured guidance and regular ongoing support throughout the program.  The program design includes an early completion option.

The Internship Program Delivery Model follows the same scope and sequence as listed above in the Multiple Subject Program with the exception of EHD 170:  Field Study C:  Final Student Teaching.  The interns complete their final student teaching over two semesters:  EHD 160A and EHD 160 B (5 units each semester).

Prior to entering the classroom the teacher interns are required to participate in preservice component which is delivered in a sustained, intensive, and classroom focused manner (identical to students in traditional programs, with the exception of final student teaching, as noted in the preceding paragraph).  The structure is as follows:

Prerequisite:  EHD 50 – Introduction to Teaching

Courses

 

Units

PHASE 1

 

 

CI 171

Understanding the Learner, Instructional Design & Assessment

3

LEE 172

Cultural and Language Contexts of the Classroom

3

LEE 173

Teaching Reading and Social Studies in Grades 4-8

3

EHD 174

Field Study A: Grades 4-8

2

 

 

 

PHASE 2

 

 

CI 175

Science Instruction and Applied Technology

3

CI 176

Mathematics Instruction and Applied Assessment

3

LEE 177

Teaching Reading and the Arts in K-3

3

EHD 178

Field Study B: Grades K-3

2

 

 

 

PHASE 3

 

 

SPED 179

Differentiated Instruction and Classroom

3

EHD 160A

Field Study A: 1 ST Semester Internship

5

 

 

 

PHASE 4

 

 

EHD 160B

Field Study B: 2 ND Semester Internship

5

Total Units for Multiple Subject Preliminary

35

The interns receive their pre-service component prior to becoming an intern by taking the following classes in Phase 1 and in Phase 2 of their course sequence. (Phases 1 and 2 must be completed prior to entering the internship program):

CI 171, LEE 172, LEE 173, EHD174 (Phase 1)

CI 175, CI 176, LEE 177, EHD 178 (Phase 2)

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