Standard 14: Creating Healthy Learning Environments

Candidates learn how personal, family, school, community and environmental factors are related to students’ academic, physical, emotional and social well-being. Candidates learn about the effects of student health and safety on learning and study the legal responsibilities of teachers related to student health and safety. Programs provide professional development for candidates to understand and utilize universal precautions designed to protect the health and safety of the candidates themselves

Candidates are exposed on a variety of levels to training as to how personal, family, school, community, and environmental factors are related to students’ academic, physical, emotional, and social well-being in CI 171: Understanding the Learner, Instructional Design and Assessment.

Prior to final student teaching with deaf and hard of hearing students (CDDS 258 an CDDS 268), all teacher candidates are required to attend four seminars provided by the Kremen School of Education and Human Development (KSOEHD) in serving at risk students, child abuse reporting, creating a supportive, healthy environment for student learning environments, teaching strategies for health, and physical health.

·         The seminar for serving at-risk students focuses on activities that help the candidates access community resources and agencies, in order to provide integrated support to meet the individual needs of each student, including social, health, educational, language services, and other resources. Each candidate is given a resource guide produced by the Fresno Metro Ministry. Group work and scenarios are used to help the candidates become familiar with the resources.  A second component of the seminar is a presenter from Child Protective Services. This presenter helps candidates become familiar with the legal responsibilities of teachers related to student health, safety, and the reporting requirements relating to child abuse. Their role as a mandated reporter responding to inappropriate and or violent behavior is reviewed.

·         A team of school nurses leads the three-hour seminar on creating a supportive, healthy environment for student learning. Candidates learn how decisions and common behaviors of children and adolescents can enhance or compromise their health and safety. Candidates learn common chronic and communicable diseases of children and adolescents, and how to make referrals when these diseases are recognizable at school. The physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs, alcohol, drugs, and tobacco and of ways to identify, refer, and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional or social health problems. Candidates also learn effective strategies for encouraging the healthy nutrition of children and youth. The nurses show slides, video clips, give handouts, and have the candidates participate in group activities.

·         In the physical health seminar, teacher candidates participate in a variety of games and activities that are effective for teaching the state-adopted academic content standards for students in physical education, including the development of a variety of motor skills and abilities in students, developing student recognition of the importance of a healthy lifestyle, developing student knowledge of human movement, student knowledge of the rules and strategies of games and sports, and student self- confidence and self-worth in relation to physical education and recreation

·         The seminar for teaching health provides teacher candidates content-specific teaching strategies that are effective in teaching the state-adopted academic content standards for students in Health. Candidates learn where and how to access resources for teaching health including acceptance of personal responsibility for lifelong health, respect for and promotion of the health of others, understanding of growth and development, and informed use of health-related information, products, and services.

·         Laws and principles related to student and parent rights, and student placements are examined in CDDS 114 Education of Exceptional Children  and in LEE 172: Cultural and Language Contexts of the Classroom. In both courses candidates are introduced effective communication with parents and the laws that govern special education and at-risk students (CDDS 114) and bilingual education placements (LEE 172).

CHARACTER_EHD178

Candidates acquire knowledge of diverse family structures, community cultures, and child rearing practices in order to develop respectful and productive relationships with families and communities. Candidates learn how decisions and common behaviors of children and adolescents can enhance or compromise their health and safety

The family structures and community values of diverse groups living in the Fresno State service area are explored in LEE 172: Cultural and Language Contexts of the Classroom. In CDDS 114, Education of Exceptional Children, candidates examine family structure and culture as it relates to their views of disabilities and to the services available for students with special needs. They reflect presentations by guest speakers to expose and sensitize candidates to family perception to the IEP process and services.

Cross-cultural communication and the language and value challenges encountered are explored through video and class discussions in LEE 172: Cultural and Language Contexts of the Classroom. Guest speakers from diverse cultures in the Fresno State service area provide candidates multiple opportunities to interact with people of many cultures and to practice cross cultural conversations.

During the EHD 178 Field Placement, candidates participate in an interactive seminar where candidates learn to practice effective strategies and techniques for crisis prevention, conflict management, and resolution in ways that contribute to respectful, effective learning environments, including recognizing and defusing situations that may lead to student conflict or violence. Our presenter has an extensive background in mediation and conflict resolution with young students which is integrated into this seminar. Small group activities include video clips, role plays, and simulations. Candidates have opportunities to practice strategies in the seminar and then apply what they learn in their field placements. Participating in these lessons and then practicing in their field placement helps candidates learn how to develop safe, inclusive positive learning environments that promote respect, value difference, and mediate conflicts according to state laws and local protocol.

Candidates learn common, chronic and communicable diseases of children and adolescents, and how to make referrals when these diseases are recognizable at school. Candidates learn effective strategies for encouraging the healthy nutrition of children and youth. Candidates have knowledge and understanding of the physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs and tobacco and ways to identify, refer and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional or social health problems. Candidates complete infant, child and adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certification that meets the criteria of the American Heart Association or the American Red Cross.

Studies on student health and its impact on learning are explored in CI 171: Understanding the Learner, Instructional Design and Assessment. During spring fieldwork courses 178 candidates are required to attend seminars to learn about the effects of student health and safety on learning and study the legal responsibilities of teachers related to student health and safety with special emphasis on their responsibility and the steps to take to report abuse (CPS). Candidates learn effective strategies for encouraging the healthy nutrition of children and youth, along with required immunizations, and how to make referrals common, chronic and communicable diseases of children when they are recognizable at school in a required seminar conducted by school nurses.  They also are required to understand the physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs and tobacco and ways to identify, refer and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional or social health problems during seminars and though use of the Resource Manual provided.  Physical growth and development, nutrition, and exercise issues are examined in CI 171.

CDDS 114 Education of Exceptional Children addresses students with health impairments and their safety. At-risk youth and behaviors that can compromise health and safety are also addressed in CDDS 114. The inclusion of health education into integrated units of study is required for lesson planning in the candidates’ field placements: EHD 178: Field Study B: Grades K-3 and EHD 170: Field Study C Final Student Teaching.

A team of school nurses leads a three-hour seminar on creating a supportive, healthy environment for student learning. Candidates learn how decisions and common behaviors of children and adolescents can enhance or compromise their health and safety. Candidates learn common chronic and communicable diseases of children and adolescents, and how to make referrals when these diseases are recognizable at school. The physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs, alcohol, drugs, and tobacco and of ways to identify, refer, and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional or social health problems. Candidates also learn effective strategies for encouraging the healthy nutrition of children and youth. The nurses show slides, video clips, give handouts, and have the candidates participate in group activities.

In CI 171: Understanding the Learner, Instructional Design and Assessment, candidates learn ways to identify, refer, and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional, or social health problems. During the Multiple Subject orientation teacher candidates are informed that they must complete CPR certification within one year of applying for their Preliminary Multiple Subject teaching credential.

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