Category I: Program Design and Curriculum

Standard 1:  Program Design, Rationale and Coordination

The clear credential program is supported by a cogent rationale, draws on a defined knowledge base, is responsive to the individual candidate’s needs, and is coordinated effectively.

Rationale

New administrators need to experience programs that are designed cohesively on the basis of a sound rationale that makes sense, and that are coordinated effectively in keeping with their intended designs.  The program should be designed to give options to individual candidates to pursue coursework and other professional development opportunities that meet their own particular needs.

Factors to Consider

The following factors serve as a guide for initial program design and ongoing program evaluation:

•  The program has an organizational structure that forms a logical sequence among the instructional components and that provides for coordination of the administrative components of the program, such as admission, advisement, retention, candidate support and assessment, and program evaluation.

The organizational structure of the program rests upon the following underpinning elements: Theme, Vision, and Mission

Theme

The theme of the Kremen School of Education and Human Development is Leadership for Diverse Communities.  From this theme is derived the vision and mission.

Vision

The Kremen School of Education and Human Development is a center for academic excellence and collaboration in the fields of education and counseling. Graduates will become community leaders who advocate for high standards and democratic values with attention to professional ethics and diversity.

Mission

The Kremen School of Education and Human Development’s mission is the recruitment and development of ethically informed leaders for classroom teaching, education administration, counseling, and higher education. Our mission is realized through a framework of teaching, scholarship, and service that addresses regional, state, national, and international perspectives.

In accordance with the theme, vision, and mission, the Educational Leadership and Administration Program prepares candidates with the skills and experiences necessary for the Central Valley of California and for educational leadership positions anywhere in the world.

That is, the skills and experiences taught in the program are those acknowledged in the literature of the field of educational administration, but also tailored to meet the needs of the cultural and linguistic diversity of the Central Valley.

Further, the Department of Educational Research and Administration and the Educational Leadership and Administration Program has jointly adopted a mission statement that guides our work in preparing future school administrators.  The mission is, “to prepare credible and relevant leaders in education”.  This statement truly embodies what we believe our work to be: that of preparing candidates to be leaders of teaching and learning that is relevant to the dynamic needs of our schools today.  High expectations for our preparation program and for our candidates leads to credibility for both.

Foundations

In order to be credible and relevant to the school districts that we serve, the Clear Administrative Services Credential program has been designed to provide a logical structure of learning activities that also allows for a high degree of individualization to meet the learning needs to prepare instructional leaders for our schools.  The program is designed around the Standards for Preliminary Administrative Services Credentials and the California Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (CPSELs) with the following six major areas of focus:

1. Shared Vision of Learning – A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a vision of leaning that is shared and supported by the school community.

2. Culture of Teaching and Learning – A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by advocating, nurturing, and sustaining a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning and staff professional growth.

3. Management of the School in the Service of Teaching and Learning – A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by ensuring management of the organization, operations, and resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment.

4. Working With Diverse Families and Communities – A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by collaborating with families and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources.

5. Personal Ethics and Leadership Capacity – A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by modeling a personal code of ethics and developing professional leadership capacity.

6. Political, Social, Economic, Legal and Cultural Understanding – A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context.

The CPSELs are incorporated into all aspects of the program and the candidate’s initial induction assessment, plan for professional development, and final evaluation of competencies attained through mentoring and mentoring, coursework, and individual professional development components of the program.

Program structure and sequence

The Clear Administrative Services Credential was designed to complement the emphasis in the first tier on instructional leadership with additional administrative skills to manage and lead schools.  Ideally, the candidate would enter the Clear Credential program immediately upon being contracted for an administrative position.  The program design takes the candidate on a planned journey of self-reflection (assessments and development of the induction plan) to a series of courses that were designed to provide the candidate with necessary managerial and leadership skills within the content areas of transformational leadership, legal aspects, school finance, personnel relations, and managing interpersonal relationships and conflict resolution.  A final course allows the candidate to develop a professional development plan for the next phase of her/his career.

However, in light of the dwindling number of candidates taking coursework in the Clear Credential program, the Educational Leadership and Administration Program decided to temporarily suspend the regular program and to offer the Clear Credential Program through the Doctoral Program in Educational Leadership at Fresno State (DPELFS).  When state funding is no longer offered for candidates to pay for the Clear Credential requirements through ACSA and county offices of education, the regular program will resume.

The following pages describe the standards-based program and present the course syllabi in Section 2.  However, immediately following the regular Clear Credential syllabi are the syllabi for the alternative courses offered through the doctoral program.  The reader will note the similarity in content is between the regular Clear Credential program and the doctoral substitution courses as follows:

Regular Clear Credential courses (See Section 2 for course syllabi):

EAD 279      Advanced Administrative Fieldwork and Mentoring 1 (1 unit) EAD 278T   Transforming Schools (1 unit)
EAD 264     Legal Aspects of Education (2 units)
EAD 266     School Finance & Business Administration (2 units)
EAD 275     Personnel Relations (2 units)
EAD 278T   Interpersonal Relations (1 unit)
EAD 279     Advanced Administrative Fieldwork and Mentoring 2 (1 unit)

Doctoral course substitutions for the Clear Credential: (Doctoral courses included embedded fieldwork) (See Section 2 for course syllabi):

EDL 201     Organizational Theory in Complex Organizations (3 units)
EDL 202     Educational Reform (3 units)
EDL 280T   School Law (3 units)
EDL 280T   Resource Management & Fiscal Analysis (3 units)
EDL 280T   Human Resource Administration (3 units)
EDL 280T   Conflict Resolution Education: Theory, Research and Application for Educational Leaders (3 units)

The table below clarifies the substitutions:

 

Doctoral CourseSubstitution

 

Regular Course

EDL201OrganizationalTheoryinComplex Organizations and

EDL202Educational Reformsubstitute

EAD278T Transforming Schools

EDL280T SchoolLaw

EAD264Legal AspectsofEducation

EDL280T ResourceManagement andFiscal Analysis

EAD266 School Finance andBusiness Administration

EDL280T Human ResourceAdministration

EAD275 Personnel Relations

EDL280T Conflict Resolution Education: Theory, Researchand Application forEducationalLeaders

EAD278TInterpersonalRelations

*All doctoral coursework includes extensive fieldwork requirements, thus the two sections of EAD 279 Advanced Administrative Fieldwork and Mentoring are substituted in the fieldwork of each course.

The sequence of the regular program is as follows:

1. Complete the Candidate Pre-assessment and Clear Credential Induction Plan – EAD 279 Advanced Administrative Fieldwork and Mentoring (1 unit)

The candidate will participate in a pre-assessment of skills, knowledge, and performance included in the California Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (CPSELs).  The candidate’s district mentor, the university mentor, and the candidate will collaborate on the assessment and in the development of a induction plan to meet the mentoring and professional development needs of the candidate.  The plan will also form the foundation for a professional portfolio that will be developed throughout the entire program.  The candidate will then receive focused coaching and mentoring from the district mentor and the university mentor, based on the induction Plan.

2. Complete selected professional development needs as indicated in the induction plan:

a. The following coursework must be successfully completed (grade of “B” or better in coursework or “CR”):

EAD 278T  Transforming Schools (1 unit)
EAD 264    Legal Aspects of Education (2 units)
EAD 266    School Finance & Business Administration (2 units)
EAD 275    Personnel Relations (2 units)
EAD 278T  Interpersonal Relations (1 unit)

Equivalent coursework may be substituted and will be reviewed and approved by the district mentor, the university mentor, and the program coordinator, including doctoral substitutions.

b. All candidates must take EAD 279 (A) Advanced Administrative Fieldwork and Mentoring (1 unit) during each semester of their enrollment in the program.  Exceptions to this requirement may be waived by the program coordinator in exceptional circumstances.  Such circumstances may include, but not be limited to the candidate receiving extensive coaching and mentoring through another acceptable medium.  This requirement is designed to ensure that the candidate receives mentoring during the entire Clear Administrative Services Credential Program.

c. Additional professional development opportunities shall be undertaken through any appropriate means including university coursework, school or district professional development, ACSA academies or conferences, reading of selected books, and any other acceptable means of meeting needs of the candidates.  Approval of these opportunities shall be agreed to collaboratively by the district mentor and university mentor and will be included in the Induction plan.

d. Ongoing coaching and mentoring of the candidate by the district mentor and the university mentor.  The candidate will keep a log of visits and topics discussed during mentoring as well as agreements reached.

3. Periodic assessment of the candidate’s progress:

At least twice each semester, the candidate will meet with the district mentor and university mentor for a formal assessment of progress.  At this time, any changes to the candidate’s induction plan will be made and included in the portfolio.

4. Complete a professional portfolio

The candidate is responsible for keeping up to date information on plans and progress during the Clear Credential.  The following sections, as a minimum, will be included in the portfolio:

a. Table of contents.
b. Personal information.
c. Assessment results and induction plan.
d. Mentoring log.
e. Professional development.
f.  Culminating assessment.

5. Complete the Professional Development Assessment – EAD 279 (B) Advanced Administrative Fieldwork and Mentoring (1 unit)

During the final semester, the candidate will complete the professional development opportunities, including mentoring, coursework, the professional portfolio, and any other opportunities as specified by the induction plan.  The university mentor will oversee the completion of these requirements in collaboration with the district mentor.  The requirements for this course include successful completion of the culminating assessment of the candidate.

6. Application for the Clear Administrative Services Credential

Once the candidate has successfully completed all requirements, including the requirement of two years of successful service under the Preliminary Administrative Services Credential, the program coordinator will provide to the candidate a Program Completion Form for the Clear Administrative Services Credential and credential application information.  The candidate should then immediately apply for the credential through the credential office of the Kremen School of Education and Human Development.

Organizational responsibilities

Please see Appendix 10 for a graphic illustrating the organizational responsibilities for recruitment; pre-advising; admissions; advising, retention, support, and assessment of candidates, and overall program evaluation.  While the program coordinator has primary responsibility for most program elements, the university mentor takes on many university responsibilities related to the candidate, and the program evaluation is shared between the various participants/stakeholders (the candidate, the candidate’s supervisor and/or the district mentor from the district, the district superintendent, local school districts, the university mentor, university program faculty members, and the program coordinator) directly involved in the candidate’s preparation.

• There is effective coordination between the program’s faculty and staff, between the education unit and the program sponsor’s other departments, and between the program sponsor, schools, districts, county offices, and other agencies where candidates are beginning their administrative responsibilities.

The Clear Administrative Services Credential program complements the Preliminary Administrative Services Credential program operated by the Educational Leadership and Administration Program within the Kremen School of Education and Human Development. There are clear lines of authority, coordination, and collaboration established between faculty, administration, and staff.  The Program has a Superintendents’ Advisory Committee composed of 25 local superintendents who collaborate actively with the Program in all three credential options: Preliminary, Administrative Internship, and Clear.  The county offices of education in the university’s six-county service area are also active collaborators in program planning, activities and evaluation.

• The overall design of the program is consistent with a stated rationale that has a sound theoretical and scholarly basis, and is relevant to the contemporary conditions of schooling (such as recent demographic changes).

The overall design of the program is consistent with the design components of the Preliminary and Internship Credentials, has a sound theoretical and scholarly basis, and is relevant to the contemporary conditions of schools.  Please see the responses to Standard 1 of the Preliminary and Intern Credential within this document.

• Any non-university activities included a university-based program are deemed appropriate by the candidate, the employer’s representative and the university advisor. The clear credential induction plan specifies which non-university activities will be included and the expected learning that will occur from the activities.

Our program information includes the following statements: “Additional professional development opportunities shall be undertaken through any appropriate means including university coursework, school or district professional development, ACSA academies or conferences, reading of selected books, and any other acceptable means of meeting needs of the candidates.  Approval of these opportunities shall be accomplished collaboratively by the district mentor and university mentor and will be included in the induction plan.”

In general, non-university activities should be directly related to the goals and objectives of the candidate’s induction plan, specify outcomes relating to the CPSEL area or principles of administrative practice, include components that include goals, expected outcomes, learning activities, expected performance standards, and evaluation design, and utilize knowledge and presenters/participants familiar with effective professional development practices for adult learners.

•  All programs include university coursework in the clear credential induction plan for each candidate.  Required coursework is responsive to the candidate’s needs and addresses content identified in Standard 3.

The Clear Administrative Services Credential Program incorporates content that complements the Preliminary Administrative Services Credential Program and leads the candidate to deeper levels of understanding in the following areas as defined by the CPSELs:

• Facilitating the development, articulation, implementation and stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by the school community

• Advocating, nurturing and sustaining a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning and staff professional growth

• Ensuring management of the organization, operations and resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment

• Collaborating with families and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources

• Modeling a personal code of ethics and developing professional leadership capacity

• Understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal and cultural context

More specifically, the Clear Administrative Services Credential Programs seeks to further develop the candidate by:

• Taking the candidate’s existing vision and converting it into a truly transformational vision that seeks to truly change existing educational structures and policies and move them to a more student and community-centered approach that is conducive to deeper student learning through enhanced leadership skills.

• Developing a deeper understanding of the management of school operations, finances, legal issues, and personnel policies and decisions, so that the learning environment for students is safe, efficient, and the overall effectiveness is maximized.

• Refining the candidate’s skills in interpersonal relations so that collaboration with staff, families, and the community within the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context is managed effectively.

• Enhancing the candidate’s personal code of ethics and the ongoing development of leadership capacity.

• The program meets other factors related to this standard of quality that are brought to the attention of the team by the program sponsor.

The Educational Leadership and Administration Program faculty meets on a regular basis to facilitate and maximize communication.  During the academic year, review of all credential program outcomes and processes takes place.  At the same time, program evaluation measures are updated at least each semester with the incorporation of new data.  Finally, communication between local school districts, program faculty, and candidates takes place on a regular basis. These mechanisms all provide data streams that lead to any review, changes, or modifications to a candidate’s program in a timely manner.

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