Lark in the Morning, The

DESCRIPTION: (Singer) meets young girl who praises plowboys. The singer meets a plowboy. He takes her "to the fair." The rest of their relationship is couched in equally allegorical terms.
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1834 (Cunningham)
KEYWORDS: lyric nonballad farming courting seduction
FOUND IN: Britain(England(North,South)) Ireland US(So)
REFERENCES (15 citations):
Sharp-100E 62, "The Lark in the Morn" (1 text, 1 tune)
Reeves-Sharp 56, "The Lark in the Morn" (1 text)
Reeves-Circle 81A, "The Lark in the Morn" (12 texts)
Kidson-Tunes, pp. 145-146, "The Pretty Ploughboy" (1 fragment, 1 tune)
Randolph 562, "Lark in the Morning" (1 text, 1 tune)
Williams-Thames, p. 236, "The Ploughboys" (1 text) (also Wiltshire-WSRO Wt 484)
CopperSeason, p. 264, "The Lark in the Morning" (1 text, 1 tune)
Kennedy 140, "The Ploughboy" (1 text, 1 tune)
Palmer-ECS, #70, "The Ploughman's Glory" (1 text, 1 tune)
RoudBishop #99, "The Lark in the Morning" (1 text, 1 tune, plus some excerpts in the notes)
Graham/Holmes 38, "The Jolly Ploughboy" (1 short text, 1 tune, which Graham places here although it is too short to really assign); p. 277, "The Lark in the Morning (a reprint of a Bodleian broadside)
Wells, pp. 273-274, "The Lark in the Morn" (1 text, 1 tune)
DT, LARKMORN* LARKMOR2*
ADDITIONAL: Allan Cunningham, The Works of Robert Burns (London, 1834 ("Digitized by Google")), Vol. II, p. 270, ("The lark in the morning") (1 fragment: one verse)
Maud Karpeles, _Folk Songs of Europe_, Oak, 1956, 1964, p. 46, "The Lark in the Morning" (1 text, 1 tune)

Roud #151
RECORDINGS:
Paddy Tunney, "The Lark in the Morning" (on Voice05) [a mixture of "The Lark in the Morning" and "Roger the Ploughboy"]
BROADSIDES:
Bodleian, Harding B 25(1070), "The Lark in the Morning" ("As I was a walking one morning in May"), Swindells (Manchester), 1796-1853; also Harding B 11(3684), Firth c.18(172), Firth b.34(224), Harding B 16(125c), Harding B 11(2060), "The Lark in the Morning"
ALTERNATE TITLES:
The Pretty Plowboy
NOTES: The narrative thread is so fragmentary that I've classed this as a lyric song, not a ballad. -PJS
There is a ballad back there, though, as Kennedy's version shows; under all the symbolism is a story of seduction. The title apparently came about because larks are among the first birds to start singing in the morning. - RBW
Cunningham (1834): "The second verse of ["To a Mountain Daisy", specifically, "Alas! It's no thy neebor sweet, The bonnie lark ...."] reminds me of a stanza of an old north country song, a favourite once with the peasantry, who loved it for its truth as well as beauty -- 'The lark in the morning Arises from her nest ....'"
Re Paddy Tunney's "The Lark in the Morning" (on Voice05): the first verse is a fragment of "The Lark in the Morning"; the second is a fragment of "Roger the Ploughboy." - BS
Last updated in version 4.1
File: ShH62

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