Auld Lang Syne

DESCRIPTION: Recognized by the first line "Should auld acquaintance be forgot" and the chorus "For auld lang syne." Two old friends meet and remember their times together, ending by taking "a cup o' kindness."
AUTHOR: Adapted by Robert Burns
EARLIEST DATE: 1797
KEYWORDS: drink friend
FOUND IN: Britain US
REFERENCES (6 citations):
Fireside, p. 76. "Auld Lang Syne" (1 text, 1 tune)
Silber-FSWB, p. 381, "Auld Lang Syne" (1 text)
Fuld-WFM, pp. 115-117, "Auld Lang Syne"
WolfAmericanSongSheets, #70, p. 6, "Auld Lang Syne" (2 references)
DT, AULDLANG* AULDLNG2*
ADDITIONAL: James Kinsley, editor, Burns: Complete Poems and Songs (shorter edition, Oxford, 1969) #240, pp. 353-354, "Auld lang syne" (1 text, 1 tune, from 1788)

Roud #13892
BROADSIDES:
Bodleian, Johnson Ballads fol. 15, "Auld Lang Syne" ("Should auld acquaintance be forgot"), J. Catnach (London), 1822; also 2806 c.17(10), Johnson Ballads 260, Harding B 11(3613), Firth b.27(413), Johnson Ballads 155A, Harding B 11(3297), Harding B 16(8a), Harding B 36(29), "Auld Lang Syne"; Harding B 11(1172), Harding B 25(86), 2806 c.14(75), 2806 c.17(11), Harding B 11(2948), Harding B 11(1831), 2806 c.17(12), "Auld Langsyne"
LOCSinging, sb10012b, "Auld Lang Syne," J. Andrews (New York), 1853-1859; also as100470, as100480, "Auld Lang Syne"

SAME TUNE:
Bohunkus (Old Father Grimes, Old Grimes Is Dead) (File: R428)
The Patches on My Pants (File: Wels078A)
On Mules We Find Two Legs Behind (Pankake-PHCFSB, p. 202; DT, MULEBEHD)
We Made Good Wobs Out There (Greenway-AFP, p. 182)
The Fish It Never Cackles Bout (Pankake-PHCFSB, p. 156)
The Salem Murder (Burt, pp. 87-88); cf. the song on the suicide of Crowningshed which follows
The Wake of Bevington (File: PalWa052)
The National Union ("Oh! who woiuld strike the recreant blow," by Charles Collins, Jr.) (WolfAmericanSongSheets p. 106)
Lafayette at Brandywine (Lawrence, p. 231)
The Psalm of Sammy Tilden ("In good Boss Tweed's successful days") (Lawrence, p. 461)
We'll Follow Grant Once More ("Oh! raise the banner high again," by Dexter Smith) (WolfAmericanSongSheets, p. 172)
John Bell of Tennessee ("There is a man of noble heart") (WolfAmericanSongSheets, p. 190)
To the Maryland Son of Revolutionary SIres! ("Ye sons of Sires, of manly deeds, who died for the love of right") (WolfAmericanSongSheets, p. 195)
"Should all my luggage be forgot" (Song by Charles Dodgson/Lewis Carroll in the mock opera "La Guida de Bragia"; cf. Donald Thomas, Lewis Carroll, A Biography, 1996 (references are to the 1999 Barnes & Noble paperback), p. 59)
William Henry Harrison campaign song ("What tho' the Hero's hard 'huge paws' Were wont to plow and sow?") (Paul F. Boller, Jr., _Presidential Campaigns_, second revised edition, Oxford University Press, p. 73)
"Hail sweetest, dearest tie that binds" (hymn by Amos Sutton)
Bells of Yale [by Theron Brown [Class of 18]56] ("O! sad the light must fall to-night, And pensive blow the gale") (Henry Randall Waite, _Carmina Collegensia: A Complete Collection of the Songs of the American Colleges_ first edition 1868, expanded edition, Oliver Ditson, 1876, p. 51)
Cannon Song ("Come, Seniors, come, and fill your pipes, Your richest incense raise") (Henry Randall Waite, _Carmina Collegensia: A Complete Collection of the Songs of the American Colleges_ first edition 1868, expanded edition, Oliver Ditson, 1876, p. 69)
Senior's Farewell ("Adieu, adue, the parting scene Now weaves its wizard spell") (Henry Randall Waite, _Carmina Collegensia: A Complete Collection of the Songs of the American Colleges_ first edition 1868, expanded edition, Oliver Ditson, 1876, p. 83)
Full Far Away a CIty Stands (by Edward Nealley, [class of 18]58) ("Full far away a city stands, 'Mid threefold walls of years") (Henry Randall Waite, _Carmina Collegensia: A Complete Collection of the Songs of the American Colleges_ first edition 1868, expanded edition, Oliver Ditson, 1876, p. 120)
Hail to the Year ("Hail! brothers to the coming year With hope and promise bright") (Henry Randall Waite, _Carmina Collegensia: A Complete Collection of the Songs of the American Colleges_ first edition 1868, expanded edition, Oliver Ditson, 1876, p. 126)
Anniversary Ode (by E. H. Sears, [class of 18]34) ("We've wandered east, we've wandered west, Since through these walks we strayed") (Henry Randall Waite, _Carmina Collegensia: A Complete Collection of the Songs of the American Colleges_ first edition 1868, expanded edition, Oliver Ditson, 1876, p. 136)
Junior Supper Song ("Brothers, there'll beam in future years No clearer, brighter light") (by A. H. Bradford, [class of 18]67) (Henry Randall Waite, _Carmina Collegensia: A Complete Collection of the Songs of the American Colleges_ first edition 1868, expanded edition, Oliver Ditson, 1876, p. 18)
Memories ("Should Time e'er mar this happy band With mourning or with grief") (Henry Randall Waite, _Carmina Collegensia: A Complete Collection of the Songs of the American Colleges_ first edition 1868, expanded edition, Oliver Ditson, 1876, p. 28)
Parting Song ("Four years of life have passed away, Since first, poor 'Fresh,' we strayed") (Henry Randall Waite, _Carmina Collegensia: A Complete Collection of the Songs of the American Colleges_ first edition 1868, expanded edition, Oliver Ditson, 1876, p. 36)
Parting Ode ("The parting hour has come at last,-- That hour expected long") (Henry Randall Waite, _Carmina Collegensia: A Complete Collection of the Songs of the American Colleges_ first edition 1868, expanded edition, Oliver Ditson, 1876, p. 53)
Farewell Song ("Fill up a bowl of sparkling wine") (Henry Randall Waite, _Carmina Collegensia: A Complete Collection of the Songs of the American Colleges_ first edition 1868, expanded edition, Oliver Ditson, 1876, p. 89)
The Good Old Cornell Times ("The October day is dull and drear") (by C. F. Sweet, [class of 18]74) (Henry Randall Waite, _Carmina Collegensia: A Complete Collection of the Songs of the American Colleges_ first edition 1868, expanded edition, Oliver Ditson, 1876, p. 112)
To Calculus, Good Bye! ("Come Juniors, sing the parting song, The happy hour draws nigh!") (Henry Randall Waite, _Carmina Collegensia: A Complete Collection of the Songs of the American Colleges_ first edition 1868, expanded edition, Oliver Ditson, 1876, p. 120)
The Blooming Cook Fell Overboard (AbrahamsRiddle, p. 61)
NOTES: This is a song that Burns rewrote (the putative original is in the Digital Tradition as AULDLNG3; compare also the broadside NLScotland, Ry.III.a.10(070), "Old Lang Syne," unknown, dated 1701 though there is no reason for this dating on the sheet); Fuld traces the "Should Auld Acquaintance" text to 1711 in James Watson's Scots Poems. Burns's own version was published in the Scots Musical Museum in 1796/7. This had a mostly traditional first verse, with the remainder by Burns, but by error the wrong melody was printed and has become the "traditional" tune.
Murray Shoolbraid offers these additional notes upon this topic:
"The Museum text is half-and-half, 2-3 being by Burns (about youthful days on the braes etc.) and the rest (seemingly) an old fragment. One can dispute this of course, for this old text first appears in SMM. Previously we have the 1711 version, 'Should old acquaintance be forgot / And never thought upon,' attributed to Sir Robert Aytoun (1570-1637/8), one of the first Scots poets to write in English (knighted by King James 1612; buried in Westminster Abbey). A bit later (1720) Allan Ramsay uses the incipit to start his own poem 'Should auld acquaintance be forgot,/ Though they return with scars?/ These are the noble hero's lot,/ Obtain'd in glorious wars.'
"These old versions go to the old tune printed in SMM: The songs that predate Burns [and B's words too] go to the old melody: in Mitchell's ballad opera The Highland Fair (1731), earliest in print in Playford's Collection of Original Scotch Tunes (1700), also sans title in Mgt Sinkler's MS., 1710 (the versions differ). The SMM version is from Neil Stewart's Scots Songs, 1772.
"So the tune is correct; it was Burns's Edinburgh publisher Thomson (Scotish Airs, 1799) who reset the words to another tune, I Fee'd a Lad at Martinmas, otherwise called The Miller's Wedding/Daughter. This is the one we all sing it to today." - (MS), RBW
Broadside LOCSinging sb10012b: J. Andrews dating per Studying Nineteenth-Century Popular Song by Paul Charosh in American Music, Winter 1997, Vol 15.4, Table 1, available at FindArticles site. - BS
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File: FSWB381B

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