Drinking of the Wine

DESCRIPTION: "Drinking (of the) wine, wine, wine, Ought to been there for a thousand years, drinking wine." In its full form, apparently a spiritual on the Eucharist. A prison version ends with "If my (brother/sister/etc.) comes for me, Tell her I've gone to Galilee"
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1909 (Odum)
KEYWORDS: drink nonballad religious wine Jesus
FOUND IN: US(SE)
REFERENCES (5 citations):
BrownIII 48, "Drinking Wine" (1 fragment)
JonesLunsford, p. 220, "Drinking of the Wine" (1 text, 1 tune)
Parrish, pp. 250-251, "Drinkin' Of the Wine" (1 text)
Jackson-DeadMan, pp. 246-248, "Drinkin' That Wine" (1 text, 1 tune)
ADDITIONAL: Howard W. Odum, Religious Folk-Songs of the Southern Negroes, (reprint from American Journal of Religious Psychology and Education, July 1909, Vol.3 pp. 265-365 "Digitized by Internet Archive")), p. 91, "(If my mother ask you for me, tell her I gone to Gallerleed") (1 text)

Roud #7851
RECORDINGS:
Bascom Lamar Lunsford, "Drinking of the Wine" (on BLLunsford01)
NOTES: The editors of Brown, having only the chorus (and that without the reference to "holy wine" found in Lunsford's version) classified this as a drinking song. Lunsford's version makes it a spiritual of sorts. But it's the same chorus, from the same area; same song in my book.
The final verses in Jackson's prison version, about the singer going to Galilee, are probably aa allusion tp Matthew 28:7, "He [Jesus] has been raised from the dead, and indeed is going ahead of you to Galilee; there you will see him." - RBW
Parrish writes, because of the swinging rhythm this was "a favorite with the chain gang for cutting weeds along the highway."
Odum has "Christ was there four thousand years ago," and has "four thousand" where Parrish has "ten thousand." - BS
Last updated in version 4.1
File: Br3048

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Song List

Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
Go to the Ballad Index Bibliography or Discography

The Ballad Index Copyright 2016 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.