Does Your Mother Know You're Out? (II)

DESCRIPTION: Singer does not understand why everyone takes him for a naive fool. So, "My station is respectable There's nothing about me In the slightest way detectable Of the apeing wain cockney ... I dresses vell ... The cry is Ho my precious svell Does ...."
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: before 1845 (broadside, Bodleian Bod9666 Harding B 11(919)
KEYWORDS: clothes fishing dancing humorous nonballad
FOUND IN:
BROADSIDES:
Bodleian, Bod9666 Harding B 11(919), "Does Your Mother Know You're Out" ("I am the laughing stock of all"), J. Pitts (London), 1819-1844; also Bod16335 Harding B 20(246), "Does Your Mother Know You're Out"
CROSS-REFERENCES:
cf. "Does Your Mother Know You're Out? (I and III)" (derivatives)
NOTES: The broadside begins, "I am the laughing stock of all." Each verse ends with the line "Does your mother know you're out?" The keywords reflect some activities the singer tries. At the end he decides to leave town and settle "in some silent glen" where no one will ridicule him. The broadside text is "in dialect." Specifically, some "w" and "v" are swapped. I assume this song goes with a stage act (note the comment for BrownIII 398 p. 473, "Does Your Mother Know You're Out?": "... 1872, adapted obviously from a vaudeville song of the time."). - BS
Last updated in version 4.2
File: BdDYMKYO

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