Central California Center for Health and Human Services

 

CVHPI News

Governor Appoints Fresno State Official to Air Quality Board
February 5, 2014

Dr. John Capitman, executive director for the Central Valley Health Policy Institute at Fresno State, was appointed by California Governor Jerry Brown to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District Governing Board. Click here to read more.

Is The Central Valley's Air Pollution Affecting Our Cells And Genes?
January 28, 2014

Here in the Central Valley – in one of the most polluted air basins in the country – we know that poor air is bad for our health. We feel it in our eyes and throat, and when we struggle to breathe.

But what if air pollution is affecting us at a deeper, cellular level? Click here to read more.

Central Valley Town Wants Tap Water Residents Can Drink
November 18, 2013

Clean drinking water is supposed to be a right in California but not everybody has it- especially those living in poor, unincorporated towns dealing with language barriers and a lack of political know-how. Click here to read more.

Health Policy News

WHO reports: 7 million premature deaths annually linked to air pollution
March 25, 2014

In new estimates, WHO reports that in 2012 around 7 million people died - one in eight of total global deaths – as a result of air pollution exposure. This finding more than doubles previous estimates and confirms that air pollution is now the world’s largest single environmental health risk. Reducing air pollution could save millions of lives.
Click here to read more at the WHO website.

 

Policy Brief: “Forty Hours is Full Time Act”
December 2013

Under the “Forty Hours is Full Time Act” more Americans would lose job-based health coverage and work hours, while federal costs would increase.
Click here to read the full policy brief (PDF) at the UC Berkeley Labor Center website.

 

New Health Equity Guide for Public Health Practitioners
December 2, 2013

A Practitioner's Guide for Advancing Health Equity is a new resource designed to help public health practitioners advance health equity through community prevention strategies. Click here to read more at preventioninstitute.org.

 

Welcome to the Central Valley Health Policy Institute

 

The Central Valley Health Policy Institute (CVHPI) was established in 2002 at California State University, Fresno to facilitate regional research, leadership training and graduate education programs to address emerging health policy issues that influence the health status of people living in Central California.

 

Our Latest Publications

Operational and Statutory Capacity of Local Health Departments in the San Joaquin Valley

Operational and Statutory Capacity of Local Health Departments in the San Joaquin Valley Operational and Statutory Capacity of Local Health Departments in the San Joaquin Valley – Released October 28, 2013.

Despite having some of the state’s highest levels of poverty and poor health outcomes, the San Joaquin Valley receives less public health funding from state and federal sources than other California counties with similar populations according to a new report from the San Joaquin Valley Public Health Consortium.

This report is the first to compare the operational capacity of local health departments in eight Valley counties to their peers in California.

Click here for full report

HEALTHY PEOPLE 2010: A 2010 Profile of Health Status in the San Joaquin Valley

Health People 2010 CoverHealthy People 2010 – A 2010 Profile of Health Status in the San Joaquin Valley culminates a decade of biannual reports which document the severity of the Valley’s health crises. Following national objectives, established in 2000 by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the report tracks health indicator progress in eight valley counties. Findings show that over the last 10 years, there was little to no improvement on key indicators. The reports also demonstrate the range of successful policies and programs that have been piloted around the region during this time. For the most part, however, these initiatives have been tested on a small scale, in isolated communities, and without the broad public engagement needed for coordinated county-wide or regional impact. The report recommends that Fresno and the region adopt a new strategy focused on primary prevention and improving quality of life in under-resourced urban and rural communities.

Click here for full 2010 report

Click here for project overview

Place Matters for Health in the San Joaquin Valley: Ensuring Opportunities for Good Health for All

Place Matters CoverPlace matters for health, and it may be more important than access to health care and health-related behaviors. The Central Valley Health Policy Institute at Fresno State and Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies released a report Wednesday, Feb. 29, comprehensively analyzing links between social, economic and environmental conditions and health in the region. The study examines the relationships between place, race and ethnicity, and health in the San Joaquin Valley of California and attempts to address two specific questions raised by the San Joaquin Valley Place Matters researchers:

  • What is the relationship between social factors and premature mortality?
  • What is the relationship between social factors and exposure to environmental hazards?

The report demonstrates that neighborhood conditions and the quality of public schools, housing conditions, access to medical care and healthy foods, levels of violence, availability of exercise options, exposure to environmental degradation can powerfully predict who is healthy, who is sick, and who lives longer. And because of patterns of residential segregation, these differences are the fundamental causes of health inequities among different racial, ethnic and socioeconomic groups. This study examined the relationship between social conditions, environmental factors, and health outcomes in the context of the unique demographic characteristics of the area.

Click here to download full report

Executive Summary in English

Executive Summary in Spanish