Sociology, B.A.

Department

Department of Sociology

Matthew Jendian, Chair
Social Science Building, Room 227
559.278.2234
www.fresnostate.edu/sociology

Degrees and Programs Offered

BA in Sociology, B.A.
MN in Sociology, Minor

Sociology majors receive strong grounding in traditional and contemporary social theory, methods of conducting social research, and techniques of analyzing social data. Courses with a service-learning component provide students with an opportunity to engage in participant-observation studies, while the Social Research Laboratory (SRL) gives them a chance to participate in survey research. Encouraging student research is one of the hallmarks of sociology at Fresno State.

The program also offers advanced courses on topics ranging from medical sociology, religion, and family to popular culture, deviance, and social movements and social change.

Courses

Sociology

SOC 1. Principles of Sociology

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. Introduction to the principles and theoretical perspectives of sociology and their application to the fundamental problems of social life. Discussion of sociological methods and findings in such areas as family, race relations, deviance. "S" sections (SOC 1S) include a Service-Learning requirement. For more information, visit www.fresnostate.edu/cesl. G.E. Breadth D3.

Units: 3
GE Area: D3

SOC 1S. Principles of Sociology

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. Introduction to the principles and theoritical perspectives of sociology and their application to problems of social life. Discussion of sociological methods and findings in such areas as family, race relations, deviance. S sections include a service-learning requirement (see page 45) G.E. Breadth D3. (CAN SOC 2)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: D3

SOC 3. Critical Thinking About Society

Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in SOC 1 for sociology majors and minors. Theory and practice in basic skills of critical thinking and sociological analysis. Skills demonstrated by oral and written performance including analysis of computerized data sets. Topics covered and assignments vary with instructor. G.E. Foundation A3. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: A3

SOC 111. Sociology of Race and Ethnicity

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Dominant and minority group relations historically, cross-culturally, and in contemporary American society. Primarily, the bases examined are in terms of ethnicity-race, religion, nationality, country-of-origin, nativity, and language. G.E. Multicultural/International MI.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
GE Area: M/I

SOC 122. Social Movements

Theory of nonviolent direct action in the pursuit of social justice and social change. Discussion of goals, ideology, norms, organizational structure, leadership, strategy, tactics, and social roots of social movements.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring - odd

SOC 125. Statistics for the Social Sciences

Prerequisite: completion of Math requirement in G.E. Foundation, B4; grade of C or better in SOC 1 for sociology majors and minors. Introduction to quantitative methods as an aid to the understanding of research in the social sciences. Application of basic descriptive and inductive statistics to the social sciences. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SOC 130W. Contemporary Social Issues

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion (C or better) of the ENGL 5B or ENGL 10 graduation requirement; Grade of C or better in SOC 1or SOC 1S for sociology majors and minors. A sociological perspective is used to examine currently debated public issues. Often, public issues involve present or proposed public policies; the impact of these policies on different segments of society is assessed. Meets the upper-division writing skills requirement for graduation.

Units: 3

SOC 130WS. Contemporary Social Issues

Prerequisites: satisfactory completion (C or better) of the ENGL 5B or ENGL 10 graduation requirement; grade of C or better in SOC 1 or SOC 1S for sociology majors and minors. Currently debated public issues are examined using a sociological perspective. Often, public issues involve present or proposed public policies; the impact of these policies on different segments of society is assessed. Meets upper-division writing skills graduation requirement. S sections include a service-learning requirement (see page 45).

Units: 3

SOC 131. Sociology of Sex and Gender

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Introduces students to the sociological study of sex and gender. Looks at how men and women experience differently such social structures as work and the economy, family and courtship, and media. Examines the evidence for the persistence of gender differences and their importance. G.E. Integration ID.

Units: 3
GE Area: ID

SOC 132. Women and Work

(SOC 132 same as WS 132.) An examination of women and work in contemporary society including housework, labor force participation, employment in various occupations, and career planning.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SOC 142. Sociology of Popular Culture

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Impact of popular culture on modern society. Includes movies, television, fiction, and other forms of popular culture. The meaning, the creation and production, and the future of popular culture. G.E. Multicultural/International MI. Accepted for G.E. program for spring 2002 through fall 2002.

Units: 3
GE Area: M/I

SOC 143. Deviance and Control

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Rule-breaking behavior (such as crime, delinquency, mental illness) and responses to it. Examines deviance as a social phenomenon, its causes and consequences, and formal and informal social control activities. G.E. Integration ID.

Units: 3
GE Area: ID

SOC 144. Social Policy Analysis

Interdisciplinary social science methods for approaching local and national social problems. Analysis of selected public issues emphasizing evaluation of social costs and benefits of alternative policies.

Units: 3

SOC 147. Medical Sociology

Political and economic organization of American medical health care system and cross-cultural comparisons. Analysis of social relations and interactions among members of the health professions affecting designations of persons as ill and their subsequent treatment.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SOC 148. Sociology of Education

A sociological examination of education as an institution, including its social determinants, functions, and consequences.

Units: 3

SOC 150T. Special Topics Seminar

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Topics include those areas of advanced theoretical and empirical studies that will orient the student to contemporary sociological endeavors.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 9 units

SOC 150T. Governance, Adm Principles, & Financial Literacy for Leaders of Community Benefit Organ

This course provides a forum for exhcange of ideas and information regarding governance, administrative principles, and the fiduciary and financial responsibilities of those leading 501c3 Community Benefit Organizations (CBOs). This course provides an opportunity for participation on a consulting team, lead by a professional consultant and supervised by faculty, that will conduct an organizational assessment and enrich students' professional leadership potential. Students will be exposed to "Standards for Excellence,' utilize social media (i.e., Web 2.0), and apply theories and concepts learned in class to approximately 20 hours of consulting with CBOs while dealing with the dynamics of teamwork, budget, and schedule constraints.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 9 units

SOC 150T. Effective Administration of Volunteers

Planning for, facilitating and creating an organizational culture conducive to community engagement and volunteer participation requires managers capable of working collaboratively to build projects that engage citizens in meaningful, goal directed work that addresses the organizational mission and meets identified need. Designed to address the issue of community participation and the management of volunteers this online course draws on material developed by for the Council for Certification for Volunteer Administration which promotes and certifies excellence in volunteer administration to advance the capacity of communities to effectively engage volunteers.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 9 units

SOC 150T. Effective Fund Development

This course provides a forum for exchange of ideas and information regarding fund development responsibilities of those leading 501c3 Community Benefit Organizations (CBOs). Using 10 steps to an integrated fund development program, this course is designed to meet the needs of those who are tasked with fundraising for their organization. From a bake sale to a capital campaign, every fundraising and fund development effort needs a well thought-out, fully integrated plan. With real-world scenarios and field work assignments, this class draws on material developed by the Association of Professionals (AFP), an international organization that promotes ethical fundraising practices and excellence in philanthropy.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 9 units

SOC 150T. Environment Sociology

This course introduces students to a variety of research traditions and debates within the field of environmental sociology. We will explore the ways in which historical and contemporary patterns of human evolution have created ecological problems; why harmful effects of pollution disproportionately impact disadvantaged groups; and what kinds of social movements have mobilized to protect ecosystems and human communities from environmental degradation. Through this exploration we will address a number of important questions pertaining to environmental and social sustainability. In addressing these topics, the course will make linkages between local, national, and global processes.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 9 units

SOC 150T. Rural Sociology

Through reading, discussion, and case studies, we will strive to gain a better understanding of rural places and rural people, in historical context and via current affairs. Demographic, economic and sociocultural change in rural communities with an emphasis on global economy, political structure, urbanization, and economic and social infrastructure. Special attention given to the San Joaquin Valley in Central California.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 9 units

SOC 151. Social Classes and Inequality

Prerequisite: Tier One courses (SOC 1, SOC 3, SOC 25, and SOC 130W or UDWE). Analysis of evaluational differentiation leading to social stratification. Criteria for differentiation, bases for evaluation, types of stratification, composition of strata and status systems, mobility, consequences of stratifications, and methods of studying stratification.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SOC 152. Classical Sociological Theory

Prerequisite: SOC 1. Evolution of classical sociological theories. Consideration of their origins in society and culture. Examination of such theorists as Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Comte, St. Simon, and others.

Units: 3

SOC 153. Sociological Theory

Prerequisite: Tier One courses (SOC 1, SOC 3, SOC 25, and SOC 130W or UDWE). Survey of classical and contemporary sociological theory. Major sociological theories presented include functionalism, conflict rationalism-utilitarianism, and symbolic interactionism, as well as their origins in the thought of Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Comte, Saint-Simon, and others.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SOC 157. Social Change

Analysis of directions, patterns, and processes of social and cultural change.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring - even

SOC 161. Population Analysis

Population theories and history; demographic processes and variables in contemporary society. Analysis of census data.

Units: 3

SOC 162. Social Psychology

Prerequisites: Tier One courses (SOC 1, SOC 3, SOC 25, and SOC 130W or UDWE). Social factors affecting the development of social personality, attitudes and behavior. Basic social processes involved in interpersonal interaction. Demonstrations and student observations to increase an understanding of social processes in everyday life

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SOC 163. Urban Sociology

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. The urban concept; form and development of urban areas; scientific study of urban places and populations; effect of urbanization on social institutions and social relations. G.E. Integration ID

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: ID

SOC 165. The Family

The family in historic and contemporary society, theoretical frameworks for analyzing the family, family dynamics; changes in family functions, structures, and roles.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SOC 168. Interpersonal Relationships

Exploration of the basic elements of interpersonal relationships including listening, disclosure, feedback, empathy. (Formerly SOC 150T section)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

SOC 169. Sociology of Religion

Major sects, denominations, and churches; integrative and disintegrative processes in the United States; contemporary religious phenomena.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

SOC 170T. Research Topics

Content of course will vary from semester to semester. Topics include an introduction to computer data analysis, a more in-depth discussion of computer data analysis, survey research, observational techniques, measurement, sampling.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

SOC 172. Computer Applications

No prior knowledge of computers is necessary. Introduction to computer applications in the social sciences, spreadsheets, database management, statistical applications, e-mail, data archives, Internet, Lexis-Nexis. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3

SOC 174. Computer Data Analysis

An introduction to the use of one of the most widely utilized computer packages for in the social sciences - SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences). No prior knowledge of computers is necessary.

Units: 3

SOC 175. Quantitative Research Methods in Sociology

Prerequisite: Tier One courses (SOC 1, SOC 3, SOC 125, and SOC 130W or UDWE). The research process with special emphasis on measurement, sampling, data collection, data analysis, and report preparation. Basic assumptions and dilemmas of social science research.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SOC 176. Qualitative Research Methods in Sociology

Prerequisites: Tier One courses (SOC 1, SOC 125, and SOC 130W or UDWE) or permission of instructor. Overview of qualitative research methods in sociology, including interviews, participant observation, historical research, and content analysis of print and audio/visual media. Examines qualitative theory, ethics, proposals, choosing a site, informant relationships, collecting and analyzing data, writing reports, and disseminating research.

Units: 3

SOC 183. Philanthropy and Grant Making

Reviews the history and evolving role philanthropy in American society. Students investigate local social problems, research nonprofit organizations that address those issues, develop a request for proposals (RFP) to fund specific projects, and evaluate funding proposals. (Formerly SOC 150T)

Units: 3

SOC 184. Grant Writing & Evaluation

Conceptual aspects of developing, writing, and evaluating a grant proposal. Emphasizes researching and preparing grant proposals as well as reading, discussing, and writing critiques of grant proposals and evaluating grant-funded programs. (Formerly SOC 150T)

Units: 3

SOC 185. Field Experience in Sociology

Prerequisite: 2.75 minimum cumulative GPA., Junior/Senior standing in Sociology and completion of Tier 1 courses. Individually-planned field experience relating sociology coursework with applied community-based experience. Hours TBA. CR/NC grading only. (Minimum of 3 field hours per week per credit unit.)

Units: 1-6
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SOC 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement --Independent Study. Approved for SP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Requirements

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements
Sociology Major

Major requirements (39 units)
Tier One: SOC 1 (or 1S), 3, 125, 130W (or 130WS) or Upper-Division Writing Exam (See Major Advising Note 2) (9-12 units)
Tier Two: SOC 151, 153, 175, 170T (12 units)
Sociology upper-division electives (15-18 units)

General Education requirements (51 units)

Electives and remaining degree requirements* (29-32 units)
(see Degree Requirements); may be used toward a double major or minor

Total (120 units)

* This total indicates that 6 units of SOC 3 in G.E. Foundation A3 and SOC 1 in G.E. Breadth D3 also may be applied to the sociology major. Consult the department chair or faculty adviser for additional details.

Major Advising Notes

  1. Tier One courses must be completed before enrollment in Tier Two courses, generally before the second semester of the junior year. Tier One courses are all prerequisites for Tier Two. Upper division electives, however, may be taken in any sequence.
  2. Students majoring in sociology are permitted to pass the Upper-Division Writing Examination (UDWE) in lieu of taking SOC 130W/WS, thus having to complete only three courses for 9 units in Tier One. If the student requests 1 unit of ENGL 100W for passing the UDWE, that unit will be applied to the overall elective unit total for the B.A.
  3. CR/NC grading is not permitted in the sociology major, except for courses offered only under CR/NC grading.
  4. General Education and elective units may be used toward a double major or minor (see double major or department minor). Consult the appropriate department chair, program coordinator, or faculty adviser for further information.
  5. No General Education Integration or Multicultural/International course offered by the Sociology Department may be used to satisfy the General Education requirements for majors in the department.

Faculty

All full-time faculty hold Ph.D.s and share a commitment to excellence in teaching. Their areas of special interest are diverse, including social change, deviance, women in society, social stratification, social psychology, social theory, and research methods. All are involved in the Center for the Study of Social Life in the San Joaquin Valley, which promotes scholarship and research with a regional focus. Most of the faculty are actively involved in research. Recent faculty research has included studies of opinions on women's issues, willingness to pay additional taxes, prayer, stereotypes and ethnic prejudice, and the social organization of sport.

Name Degree Email Phone
Helsel, Deborah G Doctor of Philosophy deborahh@csufresno.edu
Huigen, Robin C Master of Arts robinh@csufresno.edu 559.278.7496
Jendian, Matthew A Doctor of Philosophy matthewj@csufresno.edu 559.278.2891
Jones, Andrew R Doctor of Philosophy anjones@csufresno.edu 559.278.8806
Kennedy, Gregory L gregoryk@csufresno.edu
Kennedy, Vera G Master of Public Admin vekennedy@csufresno.edu
Kubal, Timothy J Doctor of Philosophy tkubal@csufresno.edu 559.278.5145
Navarro, Bernard M Doctor of Philosophy benavarro@csufresno.edu
Nelson, Edward E Doctor of Philosophy ednelson@csufresno.edu 559.278.2275
Nkosi, Janine D Doctorate of Education jnkosi@csufresno.edu
Palacio, Robert S Doctor of Philosophy bobp@csufresno.edu 559.278.5146
Randles, Jennifer M Doctor of Philosophy jrandles@csufresno.edu
Simmons, Donnie R Master of Arts dsimmons@csufresno.edu
Sullivan, Christopher B Doctor of Philosophy chsullivan@csufresno.edu
Vang, Linda M Master of Social Work lindavan@csufresno.edu
Werner, Tania L Doctor of Philosophy tpacheco@csufresno.edu
Whitley, Sarah L Doctor of Philosophy swhitley@csufresno.edu

Roadmap

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology

(Total of 39 units is needed to complete B.A. major requirements)

Year One

Fall

  • GE Area A1 Oral Communication
  • GE Area A2
  • Ge Area B4-Quantitative Reasoning
  • GE Area C1-Arts
  • Free Elective/Minor Degree Course:
  • Free Elective/Minor Degree Course:

Spring

  • GE Area A3 Critical Thinking
  • GE Area B1-Physical Science
  • GE Area C2-Humanities
  • GE Area D3-Social Science

Year Two

Fall

  • GE Area D1-American History
  • GE Area D2
  • Lower Division Major Course:
  • Free Elective/Minor Degree Course:

Spring

  • GE Area C1-Arts
  • Or
  • GE Area C2-Humanities
  • GE Area E1 Lifelong Understanding
  • Upper Division Writing Skills Requirement:

Year Three

Fall

  • Major Course:
  • Major Course:
  • Upper Division Soc Elective:
  • GE Area 1D-Soc, Pol, Econ Inst &
    Behavior, Hist Bkgnd
  • Free Elective/Minor Degree Course:

Spring

  • Major Course:
  • Upper Division Soc Elective:
  • GE Area 1C-Arts & Humanities
  • Free Elective/Minor Degree Course:
  • Free Elective/Minor Degree Course:

Year Four

Fall

  • Major Course:
  • Upper Division Soc Elective:
  • GE Area IB-Physical Univ & Life Forms
  • Free Elective/Minor Degree Course:
  • Free Elective/Minor Degree Course:

Spring

  • Upper Division Soc Elective:
  • GE Area MI-Multicultural/ International
  • Free Elective/Minor Degree Course:
  • Free Elective/Minor Degree Course:
  • Free Elective/Minor Degree Course:

Careers

Fountain on the campus grounds

Sociology is the scientific study of human social life. Sociologists seek to describe and explain patterns of human activity. Some sociologists study small groups, while others study organizations, institutions, or entire societies.

The findings from sociological research often challenge common-sense explanations. The practice of becoming a sociology student will challenge your thinking and increase your skills. Please consider joining us for the surprising study of social life!

The Sociology Department currently offers a B.A., minor degree, and two certificates: 1) the Humanics Certificate in Administration and Leadership for Community Benefit Organizations (CBOs); and 2) the Certificate in Applied Sociological Research.

Humanics

Humanics is a certificate program offering students specialized training in administration and leadership for community benefit organizations (CBOs). The Humanics program works with hundreds of CBOs in the region to prepare leaders for service to humanity.

Applied Sociological Research

Those students interested in earning a Certificate in Applied Sociological Research complete 12 units of special study to gain skills in behavioral statistics (SOC125), quantitative and qualitative research methods (SOC 175 & 176), learn program software used in computer data analysis (SOC174), and may present their research at an undergraduate research conference. The opportunity to gain practical research experience by working closely with faculty adds a special dimension to the Sociology Department and assists our students as they enter professional lives after graduation or seek graduate study in a field of their choice (including sociology, social work, counseling, criminology, public administration, public health, and business).

What You Can Do

Students trained in sociology at California State University, Fresno have entered a wide variety of occupations. A few have become professional sociologists. While most professional sociologists teach at colleges and universities, an increasing number hold research, administration, or policy positions in a variety of settings. Many students have used sociology as a preparation for law or other professions such as social work, counseling, public health, library science, criminology, and public administration. Students who begin work immediately after completing a bachelor's degree in sociology usually enter careers in human services, administration/management in public or private agencies, or research in a variety of organizations.

Interesting Classes You Might Take

  • Critical Thinking About Society
  • Sociology of Popular Culture
  • Medical Sociology
  • Sociology of Religion

What You Can Learn

  • Causes of the growth and decline of social organizations
  • Interdisciplinary social science methods for approaching local and national social problems.
  • Dominant and minority group relations historically, cross-culturally, and in contemporary American society
  • Theory and practice in basic skills of critical thinking and sociological analysis

About the College

The College of Social Sciences studies the human experience, including the depth of the past and the breadth of the entire planet.

We place emphasis on learning practical skills to aid you in your career. Our students do internships, participate in archaeological digs, or do service-learning projects with a non-profit agency. Students can assist on research projects or organize a social change project.

Whatever a student's major, they enjoy our witty and talented faculty and our caring staff as they discover our social world.

College Contact Information

email
Phone: (559) 278-3013
FAX: (559) 278-7664

Address:
5340 N. Campus Drive MS/SS91
Fresno CA 93740-8019

Department Contact Information

Department of Sociology 
5340 N. Campus Dr. - Mailstop SS97 
Fresno, CA 93740

559.278.2234 
Fax: 559.278.6468