Philanthropic and Community-Based Leadership, Minor

Department

Department of Sociology

Matthew Jendian, Chair
Social Science Building, Room 227
559.278.2234
www.fresnostate.edu/sociology

Degrees and Programs Offered

BA in Sociology, B.A.
MN in Sociology, Minor
MN in Philanthropic and Community-Based Leadership, Minor

Sociology majors receive strong grounding in traditional and contemporary social theory, methods of conducting social research, and techniques of analyzing social data. Courses with a service-learning component provide students with an opportunity to engage in participant-observation studies, while the Social Research Laboratory (SRL) gives them a chance to participate in survey research. Encouraging student research is one of the hallmarks of sociology at Fresno State.

The program also offers advanced courses on topics ranging from medical sociology, religion, and family to popular culture, deviance, and social movements and social change.

Courses

Sociology

SOC 1. Principles of Sociology

Introduction to the principles and theoretical perspectives of sociology and their application to the fundamental problems of social life. Discussion of sociological methods and findings in such areas as family, race relations, deviance. "S" sections (SOC 1S) include a Service-Learning requirement. For more information, visit www.fresnostate.edu/cesl. G.E. Breadth D3.

Units: 3
GE Area: D3

SOC 1S. Principles of Sociology

Introduction to the principles and theoritical perspectives of sociology and their application to problems of social life. Discussion of sociological methods and findings in such areas as family, race relations, deviance. S sections include a service-learning requirement (see page 45) G.E. Breadth D3. (CAN SOC 2)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: D3

SOC 3. Critical Thinking About Society

Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in SOC 1 for sociology majors and minors. Theory and practice in basic skills of critical thinking and sociological analysis. Skills demonstrated by oral and written performance including analysis of computerized data sets. Topics covered and assignments vary with instructor. G.E. Foundation A3. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: A3

SOC 3S. Critical Thinking About Society

Prerequisite: grade of C or better in SOC 1 for sociology majors and minors. Theory and practice in basic skills of critical thinking and sociological analysis. Skills demonstrated by oral and written performance including analysis of computerized data sets. Topics covered and assignments vary with instructor. S sections include a service-learning requirement. G.E. Foundation A3

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: A3

SOC 111. Sociology of Race and Ethnicity

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Dominant and minority group relations historically, cross-culturally, and in contemporary American society. Primarily, the bases examined are in terms of ethnicity-race, religion, nationality, country-of-origin, nativity, and language. G.E. Multicultural/International MI.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
GE Area: M/I

SOC 122. Social Movements

Theory of nonviolent direct action in the pursuit of social justice and social change. Discussion of goals, ideology, norms, organizational structure, leadership, strategy, tactics, and social roots of social movements.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring - odd

SOC 125. Statistics for the Social Sciences

Prerequisite: completion of Math requirement in G.E. Foundation, B4; grade of C or better in SOC 1 or SOC 1S and SOC 3 or SOC 3S for sociology majors and minors. Introduction to quantitative methods as an aid to the understanding of research in the social sciences. Application of basic descriptive and inductive statistics to the social sciences. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SOC 130W. Contemporary Social Issues

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion (C or better) of the ENGL 5B or ENGL 10 graduation requirement; grade of C or better in Tier One courses (SOC 1 or 1S and SOC 3 or SOC 3S for sociology majors and minors). A sociological perspective is used to examine currently debated public issues. Often, public issues involve present or proposed public policies; the impact of these policies on different segments of society is assessed. Meets the upper-division writing skills requirement for graduation.

Units: 4

SOC 130WS. Contemporary Social Issues

Prerequisites: satisfactory completion (C or better) of the ENGL 5B or ENGL 10 graduation requirement; grade of C or better in SOC 1 or SOC 1S and SOC 3 or SOC 3S for sociology majors and minors. Currently debated public issues are examined using a sociological perspective. Often, public issues involve present or proposed public policies; the impact of these policies on different segments of society is assessed. Meets upper-division writing skills graduation requirement. S sections include a service-learning requirement (see page 45).

Units: 4

SOC 131. Sociology of Sex and Gender

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Introduces students to the sociological study of sex and gender. Looks at how men and women experience differently such social structures as work and the economy, family and courtship, and media. Examines the evidence for the persistence of gender differences and their importance. G.E. Integration ID.

Units: 3
GE Area: ID

SOC 132. Women and Work

(SOC 132 same as WS 132.) An examination of women and work in contemporary society including housework, labor force participation, employment in various occupations, and career planning.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SOC 142. Sociology of Popular Culture

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Impact of popular culture on modern society. Includes movies, television, fiction, and other forms of popular culture. The meaning, the creation and production, and the future of popular culture. G.E. Multicultural/International MI. Accepted for G.E. program for spring 2002 through fall 2002.

Units: 3
GE Area: M/I

SOC 143. Deviance and Control

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Rule-breaking behavior (such as crime, delinquency, mental illness) and responses to it. Examines deviance as a social phenomenon, its causes and consequences, and formal and informal social control activities. G.E. Integration ID.

Units: 3
GE Area: ID

SOC 144. Social Policy Analysis

Interdisciplinary social science methods for approaching local and national social problems. Analysis of selected public issues emphasizing evaluation of social costs and benefits of alternative policies.

Units: 3

SOC 147. Medical Sociology

Political and economic organization of American medical health care system and cross-cultural comparisons. Analysis of social relations and interactions among members of the health professions affecting designations of persons as ill and their subsequent treatment.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SOC 148. Sociology of Education

A sociological examination of education as an institution, including its social determinants, functions, and consequences.

Units: 3

SOC 150T. Special Topics Seminar

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Topics include those areas of advanced theoretical and empirical studies that will orient the student to contemporary sociological endeavors.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 9 units

SOC 150T. Engaging Persons with Disabilities as Volunteers

This course is designed to address the issue of full community participation and leadership of volunteer participation of persons with disabilities as volunteer. This course draws on material developed by the Council for Certification for Volunteer Administration which promotes and certifies excellence in volunteer administration to advance the capacity of communities to effectively engage persons with disabilities as volunteers.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 9 units

SOC 150T. Sociology of Death and Dying

In contemporary society, death and grief have become private and invisible. Supportive social networks have been replaced by professionals. The Death and Dying course examines the current social context as well as cross-cultural and historical perspectives on death and grief.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 9 units

SOC 151. Social Classes and Inequality

Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in Tier One and Tier Two courses (SOC 1 or 1S; SOC 3 or 3S; SOC 125; and SOC 130W/WS or UDWE) or permission of instructor. Examines classical and contemporary theoretical approaches to the sociological study of socioeconomic inequality, including the social causes and consequences of stratification. This course will also address key policy debates, major research findings, and methodological approaches to the study of inequality.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SOC 152. Classical Sociological Theory

Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in Tier One and Tier Two courses (SOC 1 or 1S; SOC 3 or 3S; SOC 125; and SOC 130W/WS or UDWE) or permission of instructor. Evolution of classical sociological theories. Consideration of their origins in society and culture. Examination of such theorists as Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Simmel, Mead, and others

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SOC 153. Sociological Theory

Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in Tier One and Tier Two courses (SOC 1 or 1S; SOC 3 or 3S; SOC 125; and SOC 130W/WS or UDWE) or permission of instructor. Survey of classical and contemporary sociological theoretical perspectives developed after the "classical" period. Theories covered may include: micro-sociological perspectives of phenomenology and symbolic interactionism, social behaviorism, structural-functionalism, neo-Marxian perspectives and critical theory, accounts of modernity and post-modernity, feminist theory, systems theories, and others

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SOC 157. Social Change

Analysis of directions, patterns, and processes of social and cultural change.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring - even

SOC 161. Population Analysis

Population theories and history; demographic processes and variables in contemporary society. Analysis of census data.

Units: 3

SOC 162. Social Psychology

Prerequisites: Tier One courses (SOC 1, SOC 3, SOC 25, and SOC 130W or UDWE). Social factors affecting the development of social personality, attitudes and behavior. Basic social processes involved in interpersonal interaction. Demonstrations and student observations to increase an understanding of social processes in everyday life

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SOC 163. Urban Sociology

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. The urban concept; form and development of urban areas; scientific study of urban places and populations; effect of urbanization on social institutions and social relations. G.E. Integration ID

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: ID

SOC 165. The Family

The family in historic and contemporary society, theoretical frameworks for analyzing the family, family dynamics; changes in family functions, structures, and roles.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SOC 168. Interpersonal Relationships

Exploration of the basic elements of interpersonal relationships including listening, disclosure, feedback, empathy. (Formerly SOC 150T section)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

SOC 169. Sociology of Religion

Major sects, denominations, and churches; integrative and disintegrative processes in the United States; contemporary religious phenomena.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

SOC 170T. Research Topics

Content of course will vary from semester to semester. Topics include an introduction to computer data analysis, a more in-depth discussion of computer data analysis, survey research, observational techniques, measurement, sampling.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

SOC 172. Computer Applications

No prior knowledge of computers is necessary. Introduction to computer applications in the social sciences, spreadsheets, database management, statistical applications, e-mail, data archives, Internet, Lexis-Nexis. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3

SOC 174. Computer Data Analysis

An introduction to the use of one of the most widely utilized computer packages for in the social sciences - SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences). No prior knowledge of computers is necessary.

Units: 3

SOC 175. Quantitative Research Methods in Sociology

Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in Tier One and Tier Two courses (SOC 1 or 1S; SOC 3 or 3S; SOC 125; and SOC 130W/WS or UDWE) or permission of instructor. The research process with special emphasis on measurement, sampling, data collection, data analysis, and report preparation. Basic assumptions and dilemmas of social science research.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SOC 176. Qualitative Research Methods in Sociology

Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in Tier One and Tier Two courses (SOC 1 or 1S; SOC 3 or 3S; SOC 125; and SOC 130W/WS or UDWE. Overview of qualitative research methods in sociology, including interviews, participant observation, historical research, and content analysis of print and audio/visual media. Examines qualitative theory, ethics, proposals, choosing a site, informant relationships, collecting and analyzing data, writing reports, and disseminating research.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SOC 183S. Philanthropy and Grant Making

Reviews the history and evolving role philanthropy in American society. Students investigate local social problems, research community benefit organizations (CBOs) that address those issues, develop a request for proposals (RFP) to fund specific projects, and evaluate funding proposals

Units: 3

SOC 184S. Grant Writing & Evaluation

Conceptual aspects of developing, writing, and evaluating a grant proposal in the context of fund development strategies for CBOs. Emphasizes researching and preparing grant proposals as well as reading, discussing, and writing critiques of grant proposals and evaluating grant-funded programs

Units: 3

SOC 185. Field Experience in Sociology

Prerequisite: 2.75 minimum cumulative GPA., Junior/Senior standing in Sociology and completion of Tier 1 courses. Individually-planned field experience relating sociology coursework with applied community-based experience. Hours TBA. CR/NC grading only. (Minimum of 3 field hours per week per credit unit.)

Units: 1-6
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SOC 186S. Governance, Administrative Principles, & Financial Literacy

Introduces standards of excellence for effective community benefit organizations, including governance, administration and steward leadership, and fiscal management and oversight; allows for application in community-based settings. Examines elements of becoming an independent consultant to CBOs, including client assessment, contracting, reporting, and approximately 35 hours of consulting with CBOs.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

SOC 187S. Entrepreneurial Approaches to Sustainable CBOS

Applies a team-centered, open-ended, problem-solving approach and assessment utilizing service-learning and entrepreneurial methodology to enhance the organizational capacity and long-term sustainability of community benefit organizations (CBOs), including approximately 35 hours of consulting with CBOs.

Units: 3

SOC 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement --Independent Study. Approved for SP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Requirements

Philanthropic and Community-based Leadership, Minor Requirements

The Philanthropic and Community-based Leadership Minor prepares students for career paths ranging from grassroots organizing and work in nonprofit, community benefit and non-governmental organizations to employment in government agencies, legislative offices, "think tanks," advocacy organizations, or private consulting. Through an emphasis on service-learning pedagogy, the minor is designed to provide an interdisciplinary perspective to the study of diverse communities and issues facing these communities. Critical and creative analytical skills are honed in real-world settings to prepare individuals to be able to work towards viable solutions to social problems. The minor degree emphasizes a social justice approach and offers students hands-on experience in exercising critical sociological consciousness in venues concerned with pressing local, national, and international issues. Such knowledge and skills are essential for students to become leaders who are able to transform our region and society as a whole.

Requirements for the Minor

The Minor in Philanthropic and Community-based Leadership requires a minimum of 22 units, including 300 hours of experiential learning with a CBO. Involvement in the Humanics AFP Collegiate Chapter and participation in a professional development conference are required. Courses/Internships may be double-counted towards a sociology degree or used to fulfill requirements of other certificate programs and are open to undergraduate and graduate students of all majors and programs as well as to community individuals through Open University. A special major can be arranged with an adviser as well.

Required Core Coursework* (19 units minimum):
SOC 183S (3 units)
SOC 184S (3 units)
SOC 144 (3 units)
SOC 185, Field Experience in Sociology or approved internship course (3 units)
SOC 186S (3 units)
SOC 187S or MGT 133S or ENTR 163S (3 units)
SOC 190, Independent Study (1 unit)

Elective Options (3 units minimum)
ACCT 148. Accounting for Governmental and Nonprofit Organizations (4 units)
ANTH 111. Introduction to Ethnographic Fieldwork (3 units)
COMM 164. Intercultural Communication (3 units)
COMM 167. Leadership in Groups and Organizations (3 units)
COMM 168. Communication in Organizations (3 units)
COMM 171. Communication and Planning Change in the Social System (3 units)
COMM 176. Communication Consulting and Training (3 units)
CFS 118. Program Evaluation: Models & Tools (3 units)
CRIM 150. Victim Services Program Management (3 units)
CRIM 176. Victim Services (3 units)
CSH 117/GERON 117. Resource Management of Aging (3 units)
ECON 119. Urban & Regional Economics (3 units)
GERON 125/SWRK 125. Social Services for the Aging (3 units)
HRM 150. Administration of Personnel (3 units)
MCJ 152S. Public Relations (3 units)
MGT 127. Contemporary Leadership (3 units)
MKTG 100S. Marketing Concepts (4 units)
MKTG 144. Services Marketing (4 units)
PAX 110. Peace Building (3 units)
PAX 120. Mediation (3 units)
PH 100. Community Health (3 units);
PH 163. Public Health Administration (3 units)
PHIL 122. Introduction to Professional Ethics (3 units)
PLSI 181. Public Administration (3 units)
PLSI 182. Administrative Analysis: Management and Organization (3 units)
PLSI 183. Comparative Administration (3 units)
PLSI 185. Public Personnel Management (3 units)
PSYCH 155. Developmental Psychology (4 units)
PSYCH 156. Social Psychology (4 units)
PSYCH 176. Industrial Psychology (3 units)
RA 113. Serving At-Risk Youth (3 units)
RA 115. Community Placements in Leisure Settings (1-3 units)
RA 117. Special Event Planning (3 units)
RA 121. Community & Nonprofit Recreation Services (3 units)
RA 125. Diversity and Inclusive Practices in Recreation. Parks. and Tourism (3 units)
RA 135. Recreation. Parks. and Tourism Marketing (3 units)
SOC 130W or SOC 130WS. Contemporary Social Issues (4 units)
SOC 145. Social Organization (3 units)
SWRK 123. Social Welfare Policies & Programs (3 units)
SWRK 136. Cultural Diversity and Oppression (3 units)
SWRK 137. Principles in Cross-Cultural Competence (3 units)
SWRK 152. Intro to Conflict Resolution for Human Service Professionals (3 units)
WS 162. Community Service in Women’s Studies (1-3 units)

*Note: The Philanthropic and Community-based Leadership Minor also requires a 2.0 GPA and at least 12 units in residence. CR/NC grading is not permitted. except for courses offered only under CR/NC grading.

Faculty

All full-time faculty hold Ph.D.s and share a commitment to excellence in teaching. Their areas of special interest are diverse, including social change, deviance, women in society, social stratification, social psychology, social theory, and research methods. All are involved in the Center for the Study of Social Life in the San Joaquin Valley, which promotes scholarship and research with a regional focus. Most of the faculty are actively involved in research. Recent faculty research has included studies of opinions on women's issues, willingness to pay additional taxes, prayer, stereotypes and ethnic prejudice, and the social organization of sport.

For faculty phone numbers and e-mail, see the campus directory.

For more on the faculty, see the faculty pages.
The faculty pages are updated by the department or program.

Careers

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