General Business, Minor

Department

Department of Management

Julie Olson-Buchanan, Chair
Peters Business Building, Room 289
559.278.2851
FAX: 559.278.4911
www.fresnostate.edu/craig/depts-programs/mgt

Degrees and Programs Offered

BS in Business Administration - Human Resource Management Option, B.S.
BS in Business Administration - Management Option, B.S.
BS in Business Administration - Entrepreneurship Option, B.S.
MN in General Business, Minor
MN in Entrepreneurship, Minor

The Department of Management offers three options within the Bachelor of Science in the Business Administration degree program: (1) Entrepreneurship, (2) Human Resource Management, and (3) Management.

The Entrepreneurship Option offers students a comprehensive academic experience in entrepreneurship that starts with the classroom and links to the community. It integrates core business concepts around the formation, start-up, and growth of an entrepreneurial firm. By taking a select group of entrepreneurship courses, the students learn how to launch their own business idea.

Students can facilitate their learning experience through active involvement in the Lyles Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Craig School's Small Business Institute, and the Institute for Family Business.

The Human Resource Management (HRM) Option is one of only 57 programs nationally -- and the only program in the California State University system -- that has been certified by the Association of University and College Industrial Relations and Human Resource programs. The HRM Option has consistently ranked in the top five programs nationally. This ranking is based on the number of students who pass the Professional in Human Resource exam given by the Society of Human Resource Management.

HRM students explore how organizations can best utilize their most important resource - their employees. Among the issues discussed are how to recruit and select the best employees, how to determine fair compensation, how to use benefit and performance appraisal systems that reward high performance, how to comply with federal and state employment laws, and how to negotiate and resolve employment disputes. The courses offered are intended to help those interested in creating a work environment that promotes teamwork and encourages employee excellence.

The Management Option develops skills, knowledge, attitudes, and abilities necessary for effective leadership in a wide variety of organizations. Graduates are prepared for entry-level leadership positions in today's rapidly-changing workplace through a dynamic curriculum combining theory, skill development, and practical experience, including internships in the student's area of interest. Courses develop those leadership abilities demanded by employers that include written, oral, analytical, and people skills. The option also provides a strong foundation for the M.B.A. Students may choose one of the following three tracks:

Organizational Leadership - Courses in this track prepare students for positions as project leaders, team leaders, and business managers. Courses emphasize leadership issues such as self-directed work teams, performance improvement, negotiating, vision and goal setting, and change management.

Production/Logistics Management (PLM) - This track provides students with a foundation for a variety of management career opportunities in manufacturing and distribution. With total quality management as a common basis, the PLM curriculum combines the two integrated disciplines of production/operations (transformation of resources into high quality products and services) and logistics (management of supply and distribution activities). Emphasis is placed on complementing the student's knowledge of PLM subject matter with hands-on, industrial experience gained through internship programs with local firms.

Special Management Applications - This track is designed for Management Option students who have a professional interest in a particular industry chosen by the student (agriculture, fashion merchandising, health science, industrial technology, recreation, theater, etc.) Students take business and organizational leadership courses and then, with approval of the department chair, select courses in their specific areas of interest.

Courses

Management

ENTR 81. Introduction to Entrepreneurship

Develops an understanding of the complex tasks faced by individuals engaged in entrepreneurial activities. Identifies the methods for developing a business idea, the process of starting a business, how to acquire resources, and the key parts of a business plan. (Formerly MGT 81)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENTR 151. Opportunity Assessment

Presents tools and techniques for evaluation and assessment of opportunities for new businesses are presented. Idea assessment, market and competitive analysis, trends, distribution systems and customer needs are evaluated to determine if launching a business is feasible. Assessments will be made across industries including retail, manufacturing, distribution, services, and technology. The course provides the foundation for writing a business plan.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENTR 153. Business Plan Writing

Prerequisite: ENTR 81, ENTR 151; MGT 110. This course is designed to provide the student with both (1) an understanding of what is required to start a new firm and (2) the skills needed to write a business plan that will meet the standards for funding by an investor or financial institution. (Formerly MGT 153)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENTR 155. Managing the New Venture

Prerequisite: ENTR 81 and ENTR 153. Special problems of small businesses: initiation, financing, operations. Class projects: studying local business operations; preparing business plans and financial requests. (Formerly MGT 155)

Units: 3

ENTR 157. New Venture Laboratory

Prerequisites: ENTR 151, ENTR 153. Students develop a business idea that results in a business plan. In a laboratory setting, students interact with entrepreneurs, suppliers, customers, and experts in order to create a new venture that may become viable. (Formerly MGT 157)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ENTR 161. Urban Entrepreneurship

Prerequisites: ENTR 81. Urban environments have their own special planning, psychology, economics, design and politics. Opportunities abound, but require a different skill set for the entrepreneur. Students will participate in urban space, identify opportunities, and develop projects that may lead to successful launches of new enterprises. Presentation of a business concept for urban space will conclude the course.

Units: 3

ENTR 163S. Social Entrepreneurship

Explores current thoughts, and trends, and challenges in the emerging field of social entrepreneurship. Special attention is placed on service-learning and measuring social impact. Students gain hands-on experience working with supporting social ventures. Guest lectures and site visits. (Formerly INOV 191T)

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 9 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall

ENTR 165. Corporate Entrepreneurship

Prerequisite: ENTR 81. This course is about entrepreneurship in established companies, or entrepreneurship. The course will address the emerging theories and practices of entrepreneurship and apply them to a corporate setting. Issues of how to establish corporate entrepreneurial vision, strategy, and direction are presented. Methods for relating entrepreneurship to other functions such as human resource management, new product development, research and development, and corporate venturing are discussed.

Units: 3

ENTR 167. Franchising

Prerequisite: ENTR 81. Students examine franchising from both the franchisor and franchisee perspectives. Topics include the evaluation of franchising opportunities, legal concerns of franchising, the development of appropriate franchising strategies, and the successful planning, implementation, and launching of franchise networks and franchised outlets. (Formerly ENTR 189T)

Units: 3

ENTR 169. Family Business Management

Prerequisite: ENTR 81. The course addresses aspects of managing an established family business, on a day-to-day basis and planning for succession to the next generation.

Units: 3

ENTR 189T. Topics in Entrepreneurship

Studies in entrepreneurship, business plan writing, and problems in small business management.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 9 units

ENTR 189T. Entrepreneurship Mentor Program

Provides students with significant building of entrepreneurial skills through seminars, matching with a community leader, workshops, field trips, and events.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 9 units

ENTR 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- Independent Study. Approved for SP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENTR 193. Supv Work Exper

Units: 1

ENTR 195. Internship

Prerequisites: permission of internship coordinator. Requires 150 hours of work at a pre-qualified, academically related work station (business, government, or nonprofit agency). Reflective journal, final report, and work station evaluation. Prior department approval is required for course substitutions. Only one internship may count toward option requirements. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

HRM 150. Administration of Personnel

Prerequisites: MGT 110, and BA 105W or ENGL 160W (may be taken concurrently). Composition of labor force; acquisition and utilization of human resources; recruitment; selection; performance appraisal; motivation; compensation; communications; social issues and government influence. Individual and group projects; written and oral reports.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

HRM 152. Labor Relations and Collective Bargaining

Prerequisite: HRM 150 and BA 105W or ENGL 160W. Relations between employers and organized employee groups; organization, election, and certification procedures; techniques of collective bargaining; labor agreements; grievance handlings; settlement of industrial disputes. Class discussion, student presentations.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

HRM 153. The Staffing of Organizations

Prerequisite: HRM 150 and BA 105W or ENGL 160W. In-depth study of major staffing issues such as recruitment and selection of employees. Emphasis on practical application of issues for future managers and HRM professionals. Group projects, class discussion, guest lecturers, and experimental exercises.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

HRM 154. Compensation Administration

Prerequisite: HRM 150 and BA 105W or ENGL 160W. Analysis of compensation programs for organizations. Special attention given to job evaluation programs, motivation-to-work theory, micro and macro forces influencing compensation decisions. Case analysis; individual and group reports.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

HRM 157. Legal Aspects of Human Resource Management

Prerequisite: HRM 150 and BA 105W or ENGL 160W. Survey of law related to employment, including discrimination, wrongful discharge, safety and health requirements, and other government regulations. Attention given to prevention and resolution of legal complaints and to emerging public issues. Oral presentations, discussions.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

HRM 159. Seminar in Human Resource Management

Prerequisites: last-semester senior status; HRM150, BA 105W or ENGL 160W, and completion of at least three of the following classes: HRM 152, HRM 153, HRM 154, HRM 157. Integration of human resource management knowledge. Case analysis and discussion. Students will be required to take the PHR certification exam and to independently pay a mandatory test fee.

Units: 3

HRM 189T. Topics in Human Resource Management

Prerequisite: senior standing. Studies in personnel and labor relations, recruitment, selection, retention, compensation, employment law, and business ethics.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 9 units

HRM 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

HRM 195. Internship

Prerequisite: permission of internship coordinator. Requires 150 hours of work at a pre-qualified, academically-related work station (business, government or nonprofit agency). Reflective journal, final report, and work station evaluation. As a course substitution, prior department approval is required. Only one internship may count toward option requirements. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

MGT 104. Administrative Principles of Management

Prerequisite: BA 105W or ENGL 160W (may be taken concurrently). Not open to students with credit in MGT 110. Business majors need department consent to tkae this course. Focus on planning techniques, organization theory, and ethical control processes in domestic and international business. Case analysis, management simulations, and written projects.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

MGT 106. Behavioral Principles of Management

Prerequisite: BA 105W or ENGL 160W (may be taken concurrently). Not open to students with credit in MGT 110. Business majors need department consent to take this course. Focus upon the human dimensions and interpersonal skills of management, including motivation, job design, leadership, conflict, communication networks, and organizational change. Case analysis, written projects, small group exercises, and development of communication and interpersonal skills.

Units: 3

MGT 110. Administration and Organizational Behavior

Prerequisite: BA 105W or ENGL 160W (may be taken concurrently). Not open to students with credit in MGT 104 or MGT 106. Development of management skills with emphasis on organization, communication networks, leadership, reward systems, conflict management, change, ethics, and stress. Case analysis, written projects, small group exercises.

Units: 6
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

MGT 124. Production/Operations Management

Prerequisites: DS 123 (may be taken concurrently); BA 105W or ENGL 160W; MGT 110. Production/operations systems and problems in manufacturing and service organizations, including product development and process selection; facility location and design; operations planning and control; materials handling; inventory and quality control; project management. Lecture discussion; computer simulation.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

MGT 127. Contemporary Leadership

Prerequisites: MGT 110 and BA 105W or ENGL 160W (may be taken concurrently). Individual and team leadership development. Leadership potential assessment, contemporary leadership theories, and oral and written communications skill development. Guest speakers, experiential exercises, and case studies.

Units: 3

MGT 131. International Management

Prerequisites: MGT 110. A review of the unique issues, problems, and challenges of managing enterprises in an international environment. Comparative analysis of management styles and cultures, managerial processes and strategy formulation. Focuses on American, European, and Japanese enterprises. Seminar discussion and cases.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

MGT 133S. Managing Nonprofit and Socially Responsible, Sustainable Organizations

Prerequisites: MGT 104 and MGT 106, or MGT 110 and BA 105W or ENGL 160W (may be taken concurrently). Examination and analysis of the critical features of nonprofit and socially responsible, sustainable organizations in the private sector. Topics include ethics issues in management, governance, managing and motivating volunteers and employees in nonprofit context, sustainability approaches and practices. Lecture, case studies, field experience, and research.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

MGT 158. Project Management

Phases of the project life-cycle; basic tools and techniques for planning, scheduling, and control of projects; project organizations; project roles; techniques for building effective project teams; risk management; information technology and e-business projects; computer/Internet applications of project management.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

MGT 180. Seminar in Management Theory and Organization Design

Prerequisites: MGT 110 and BA 105W or ENGL 160W (may be taken concurrently). Organizations as open systems functioning in the external environment; organization development as a planned intervention emphasizing effective implementation of system changes, integrating mechanisms in response to perceived contingencies; and strategic issues of organizational life cycles.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

MGT 182. Seminar in Applied Conflict Management Techniques

Prerequisites: MGT 110 and BA 105W or ENGL 160W (may be taken concurrently). Sources of conflicts and how to resolve them in organizations; theory and practice of negotiation, alternative conflict resolution techniques, mediation, employee voice, and employee deviance. Experiential exercises and case analyses will be used to enhance the application of the course material.

Units: 3

MGT 187. Seminar in Strategic Management

Prerequisites: last-semester senior, completion of CSB core requirements (only MGT 124 may be taken concurrently); and BA 105W or ENGL 160W. Focuses on strategic management, industry analysis, global competitive environment, formulation and implementation of strategy, ethical issues, mergers and acquisitions, and management of strategic alliances. Case analysis/computer simulations included.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

MGT 189T. Topics in Management

Prerequisite: senior standing. Studies in management, organizational theory, organizational behavior, production, transportation, business administration, special management and organizational problems.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 9 units

MGT 189T. Creativity, Innovation, and Opportunity through Experience

Students are exposed to a variety of new experiences to bolster creativity, opportunity recognition, and recombinant innovation skills. Through immersion students gain a more thorough knowledge of how business is done in the Central Valley, and where the next wave of opportunities lie. Course meets every other Saturday from 9am - 2:50pm and is partially taught online.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 9 units

MGT 189T. Women and Work

An examination of women and work in contemporary society, including housework, labor force participation, employment in various occupations and career planning.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 9 units

MGT 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

MGT 195. Internship

Prerequisite: permission of internship coordinator. Requires 150 hours of work at a pre-qualified, academically-related work station (business, government or nonprofit agency). Reflective journal, final report, and work station evaluation. Prior department approval is required for course substitutions. Only one internship may count toward option requirements. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Requirements

Business Minors * Requirements

General Business Minor

ACCT 4A (3 units)
Select from: BA 18; DS 73; FIN 120; IS 130; MGT 104, 106, 110; MKTG 100S(6-8 units)
Select upper-division courses from not more than two fields: ACCT, BA, DS, ENTR, FIN, HRM, IS, MGT, MKTG(11 units)
Total (20-22 units)

* Students must earn a grade of at least C in each course.

The Graduate Business Preparation Minor is for students who wish to pursue the Craig M.B.A. after completing an undergraduate major outside the Craig School of Business. By completing the requirements of the minor, all Group I coursework (15 units) usually required of non-business majors for the Craig M.B.A. may normally be waived. See M.B.A. for further information on admission requirements.

Advising Notes

All minors also require a 2.0 GPA and 6 upper-division units in residence.No course taken for the business minors can be graded on a CR/NC basis except for courses with mandatory CR/NC grading. Courses in a major cannot be applied toward a minor unless designated as "additional requirements."

 

Faculty

The faculty of the Department of Management comprises individuals who have studied and pursued business careers throughout the world. Well over a dozen specializations within the field of business administration are taught, researched, and shared with the business community by these professors. Case studies, experiential exercises, computer simulations, laboratory research, business community projects, guest speakers, and seminar discussions are just a few of the ways in which instructors provide the students with a "real-world" exposure to business. The combination of faculty expertise, teaching skills, research activities, and business experiences assures the student of receiving the best possible management education..

Name Degree Email Phone
Angel, Roy C Master of Business Admin royangel@csufresno.edu
Bennett, Barry J Juris Doctor barryb@csufresno.edu
Bitter, Janet R Master of Business Admin jbitter@csufresno.edu 559.278.4968
Bommer, William H Doctor of Philosophy wbommer@csufresno.edu 559.278.2493
Bradley - Geist, Jill C Doctor of Philosophy jbradley@csufresno.edu 559.278.2830
Brannelly, Patrick J Master of Business Admin pbrannelly@csufresno.edu
Burch-Konda, Regina L Doctor of Philosophy reginab@csufresno.edu 559.278.4968
Burns, Thomas M Master of Business Admin tombu@csufresno.edu 559.278.2931
Engel-Silva, Michelle R Doctorate of Education mesilva@csufresno.edu
Houts, Lisa M Master of Business Admin lisahouts@csufresno.edu 559.278.4980
Karimi, Zari Master of Arts zkarimi@csufresno.edu 559.278.8054
Keppler, Mark J Juris Doctor mkeppler@csufresno.edu 559.278.1165
Kimball, Robert P Master of Business Admin rokimball@csufresno.edu
Liguori, Eric W Doctor of Philosophy eliguori@csufresno.edu 559.278.4566
Liou, Ru-Shiun Master of Business Admin rliou@csufresno.edu
Littlewood, Michelle K Juris Doctor mlittlewood@csufresno.edu
Moghaddam, Jahanguir M Doctor of Philosophy johnm@csufresno.edu
Nasalroad, Ralph E Master of Business Admin rnasalroad@csufresno.edu
Olson-Buchanan, Julie B Doctor of Philosophy julieo@csufresno.edu 559.278.2851
Penbera, Joseph J Doctor of Philosophy jpen@csufresno.edu 559.278.4962
Pokelwaldt, Robert W Master of Business Admin rpokelwaldt@csufresno.edu
Sanchez, Rudolph J Doctor of Philosophy rjsanchez@csufresno.edu 559.278.2819
Scharton, Craig M Master of Science cscharton@mail.fresnostate.edu
Schmidtke, James M Doctor of Philosophy jmschmidtke@csufresno.edu 559.278.6636
Schmidtke, Jennifer I Doctor of Philosophy jenisom@csufresno.edu 559.278.2691
Sebra, Nelson T Master of Public Admin nsebra@csufresno.edu
Singh, Upkar K Master of Arts sesingh@csufresno.edu 559.278.4968
Stearns, Timothy M Doctor of Business Admin timothys@csufresno.edu 559.347.6834
Sterling, Christopher M Doctor of Philosophy csterling@csufresno.edu
Taylor-Hamm, Laurie K Master of Business Admin ltaylorhamm@csufresno.edu 559.278.2626
Wang, Jia Doctor of Philosophy jiaw@csufresno.edu 559.278.4977
Young, Deborah R Master of Business Admin debbiey@csufresno.edu 559.278.4985