History - Teaching Option, M.A.

Department

Department of History

Michelle DenBeste, Chair
Social Science Building, Room 101
559.278.2153
www.fresnostate.edu/socialsciences/historydept/

Degrees and Programs Offered

BA in History, B.A.
CERT in American History, Certificate of Adv. Study
MA in History, M.A.
MA in History - Teaching Option, M.A.
MN in History, Minor

The History Department offers a major and minor in history for the Bachelor of Arts degree, a graduate program leading to the Master of Arts, and courses for use in the teaching credential program. It participates in the interdisciplinary programs and minors in Armenian studies, Asian studies, classical studies, Latin American studies, Russian area studies, and women's studies. History courses may also be used as electives toward graduation in most other majors, and the History Department encourages students to take minors and second majors in other fields as well.

History

History is the study of humanity’s recorded past. It encompasses all aspects of human behavior, social organization, and cultural development. The arts and the sciences, the development of technology, and changing economic forces are as much a part of history as is politics or social conflict.

Students of history are engaged in a journey through time in which they can witness and compare the development of a variety of cultures and the interrelations between people in many different circumstances. Through the study of past events, history provides a great storehouse of experience by which the theories of the other social sciences can be tested. And through its analysis of the development of institutions and cultures, it provides one of our best tools for understanding social phenomena.

History is also one of the broadest and most universal of the humanities. Just as the personalities of individuals are shaped through the totality of their past experiences, so cultures and institutions also develop in time. The study of history can help students understand themselves and their culture better and develop a more tolerant and humane spirit toward others. In this way, as in so many others, a knowledge of the past can help all of us meet the problems of today with greater understanding and compassion.

Program

The History Department offers a major and minor in history for the Bachelor of Arts degree, a graduate program leading to the Master of Arts, and courses for use in the teaching credential program. It participates in the interdisciplinary programs and minors in Armenian studies, Asian studies, classical studies, Latin American studies, Russian area studies, and women's studies. History courses may also be used as electives toward graduation in most other majors, and the History Department encourages students to take minors and second majors in other fields as well.

The History Department is a chartered member of Phi Alpha Theta National History Honor Society. Our chapter is Alpha Kappa Beta.

Courses

History

CI 161. Mth Mtl S Sci

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 999 units

EHD 154B. Final Student Teaching Seminar - Social Sciences

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in EHD 155B. Seminar to accompany final student teaching that provides opportunities for candidates to investigate and discuss variety of topics and strategies and to reflect on issues that surface during their student teaching experience.

Units: 1

EHD 155B. Studt Tchg S Sci

Prerequisites: admission to student teaching, EHD 155A, CI 161 (or concurrently, depending on major departmental policy); senior or post baccalaureate standing; approval of major department including subject matter competency approval; completion of the subject matter preparation program or passing the subject matter examination(s) designated by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. Supervised teaching in single subject classroom; assignment is for the full day; five days per week. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 5-10, Repeatable up to 999 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

HIST 1. Western Civilization I

The Mediterranean and European world from prehistoric to early modern times. Social, political, intellectual, and artistic movements in the ancient Fertile Crescent, classical Greece and Rome, and in Medieval, Renaissance, and Reformation Europe. (CAN HIST 2)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

HIST 2. Western Civilization II

Survey of modern European culture since the 17th century. Impact of industrialization and urbanization; political revolutions and ideologies; intellectual, artistic, and religious movements; European imperialism; the two world wars and changing patterns in contemporary European life. (CAN HIST 4)

Units: 3

HIST 2Z. West Civliztn II

Units: 3

HIST 3. Colonial Americas

Examines the colonial history of North and South America. Analyzes the impact of European colonization of Native American societies, the African slave trade, the evolution of colonial societies, and the independence movements in the 18th/19th centuries.

Units: 3

HIST 4. Introduction to Historical Skills

Students receive careful guidance in basic historical skills; writing book reviews, taking notes, conducting research, quoting and documenting sources, formulating thesis statements, and presenting one's research in both oral and written forms.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

HIST 6. East Asian Civilization

Introduction to the history and cultures of the East Asian countries, particularly China, Japan, and Korea. Examination of the East Asian mind as reflected in Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and in resistance to the challenges of the West.

Units: 3

HIST 7. African Civilization

Survey of African history from ancient times to the present. Emphasis is on political, economic, and religious movements which have contributed to the rich diversity and the distinctive unity of African civilization.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

HIST 8. Republics of Latin America

Rise of the modern Hispanic American states since 1800: political, social, economic development.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

HIST 9. Russian and Eurasian Civilization

Introduction to the history, culture, literature and visual and performing arts of Russia and Eurasia from the late medieval period to the present.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

HIST 11. American History to 1877

Examines the history of the United States through 1877, looking at the significant events from the founding of the colonies through Reconstruction, including the role of major ethnic and social groups in the formation of the American nation. G.E. Breadth D1. (CAN HIST 8)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: D1

HIST 12. American History from 1877

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. Examines the history of the United States from 1877, looking at the significant events from the end of the Civil War to the present, including the role of major ethnic and social groups in the formation of the American nation. G.E. Breadth D1. (CAN HIST 10)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: D1

HIST 20. World History I

The economic, political and social development in world history from the earlist times to modern period (1500). GE Bredth D3. of

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: D3

HIST 21. World History II

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. The economic, political, and social development in world history from 1500 to the present. G.E. Breadth D3.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: D3

HIST 100W. Historical Research and Writing

Prerequisites: HIST 4, ENGL 5B and ENGL 10, upper-division standing. Individual guidance and criticism in research, writing, argumentation, and documentation. While engaging in historical research and writing, students gain a deeper appreciation of the discipline's theoretical and methodological concerns. Meets the upper-division writing skills requirement for graduation.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

HIST 101. Women in History

(HIST 101 same as WS 101.) Prerequisite: G.E. Fondation and Breadth Area D. Historical survey of women's roles in history, with an emphasis on the emergence of the feminist movement. G.E. Intergration ID

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: ID

HIST 102T. Topics in Women's History

(HIST 102T same as WS 102T.) (See Schedule of Courses for specific topics.)

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

HIST 102T. Fashion and History

This course is a study of fashion history in diverse cultures, focusing on garments such as kimonos, saris, dashikis, three-piece business suits, and wedding attire and on the globalization of the garment and fashion industries. By understanding clothing in its historical context, students learn about global culture and history as well as about socioeconomic forces such as immigration that shape the design and meaning of clothing. Studying the history of fashion in this manner reveals the relationship between everyday objects and wider social structures, and teaches students the methodologies of material culture analysis.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

HIST 103. History of Early Christianity

Early Christianity from the first century to eve of Reformation.

Units: 3

HIST 104. History of Women and Men in Modern Europe

This course studies the everyday lives of modern European women and men in historical context. It examines how gender identities and relations developed and changed through industrialization, revolution, wars, and social and political movements.

Units: 3

HIST 105. Armenian Genocide in Comparative Context

(ARMS 105 same as HIST 105.) Review of theory and characteristics of genocide. Study of the Armenian Genocide as an example and show comparison with other genocides in the 20th century. Discusses role of international constituencies and prevention and lessons of genocide. (Formerly HIST 109T section)

Units: 3

HIST 106. Armenians in North America

(ARMS 106 same as HIST 106). Study of six waves of Armenian migrations to North America from 1870-1995. Topics discussed include entry, settlement, work, family, community organizations, church, politics, culture, and integration in U.S. society. (Formerly ARMS 120T section)

Units: 3

HIST 107. Modern Middle East

Analysis of Middle Eastern history since Muhammad, with emphasis upon the 19th and 20th centuries. The Middle East under European imperial domination; nationalist movements and revolutions; the Arab-Israeli conflict; the Middle East in contemporary world politics.

Units: 3

HIST 108A. Armenian History I: Ancient and Medieval

(HIST 108A same as ARMS 108A.) History of Armenia and Armenians from prehistoric times to the beginning of the modern era. The historical process will be considered from Armenia's point of view as well as from that of its neighbors: Assyria, Iran, Rome, Byzantium, the Arabs, the Seljuk Turks, the Crusades, the Mongols, and various Turkish dynasties.

Units: 3

HIST 108B. Armenian History II: Modern and Contemporary

(HIST 108B same as ARMS 108B.) Overview of modern and contemporary Armenian history, including Armenia's relations with Persian, Turkish, and Russian empires, the Armenian Renaissance, the "Armenian Question," the Genocide, the Armenian Republic, Soviet Armenia, the Second Armenian Republic, and diasporan communities in America, Europe, and the Middle East.

Units: 3

HIST 109T. Studies in Middle East and Africa

Intensive study of special topics.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

HIST 109T. The Roman World of Late Antiquity

This course will consider the history of Rome from the end of the second century to the start of the sixth, with special reference to the cultural, religious, political, and military changes which took place on the eve of the Early Middle Ages, and on the very brink of Roman collapse in the West.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

HIST 110. Ancient Near East

Ancient civilizations of the Middle East. History and culture of the Sumerians, Assyrians, Babylonians, and Persians from the dawn of history to Alexander the Great and the ascendance of Greece.

Units: 3

HIST 111. Ancient Greece and Egypt

The history and culture of ancient Greece from the Minoan-Mycenaean periods through the Golden Age of Athens to the dissolution of the empire of Alexander the Great.

Units: 3

HIST 112. Ancient Rome

The early history of Rome and the evolution of Roman society, politics, and culture through the republican and imperial periods.

Units: 3

HIST 115. Ancient Israel

Ancient Israel from Abraham to the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 A.D. Jewish religious thought is discussed by placing the books of the Old Testament in their historical context.

Units: 3

HIST 116. Greek and Roman Religion

Analysis of the religious ideas, customs, and practices of ancient Greeks and Romans from the time of Homer to the establishment of Christianity.

Units: 3

HIST 117. Alexander the Great & Hellenistic World

Examines the rise of Macedon, the conquests of Alexander the Great, and his successors' establishment of Hellenistic kingdoms in the remnants of the Persian Empire. Explores cultural, social, economic, and political interactions between Greek and Near Eastern societies (Formerly Hist 119T).

Units: 3

HIST 118. Augustus & Rome

Examines the history of the rise to power, rule, and influence of Augustus. Beginning with the late republican era, the course traces Augustus' consolidation of power, transformation of Roman politics and culture, and his search for a succsor (Formerly Hist 119T).

Units: 3

HIST 119T. Studies in Ancient History

Intensive study of special topics.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

HIST 121. The Middle Ages

Prerequisite: HIST 1 or permission of instructor. Medieval Europe from the fall of the Roman Empire in the West to the Renaissance.

Units: 3

HIST 122. Medieval Culture

Selected aspects of medieval life and culture such as warfare, commerce, art and architecture, learning and the university presented as manifestations of the medieval mind. Extensive use of visual materials.

Units: 3

HIST 124T. Studies in Medieval History

Intensive study of special topics.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

HIST 125. Renaissance

Social, intellectual, political, and economic factors that shaped Europe in the 14th and 15th centuries; humanism, foundations of the state; secularization and dissent within the church.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

HIST 126. Reformation

Analysis of the political, social, and intellectual movements associated with the 16th century religious upheaval.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

HIST 127. Women & Power in Early Mod Europe

An exploration of the roles of European women circa 1400-1800, this course studies perceptions and representations of women, and secular/religious constraints upon them. We also investigate women's own views, and the ways in which they confronted and/or manipulated social strictures.

Units: 3

HIST 129T. Studies in Intellectual and Social History

Topics concerned with ideas and movements that have significantly shaped the course of history.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

HIST 129T. The Age of Enlightenment

This course investigates the foundations, development, and limits of the Enlightenment, the most influential intellectual discourse of the long 18th century (roughly dated 1650 - 1800). Focusing on using reason to improve the human condition, the Enlightenment here is explored not as a unitary movement, but as a series of debates regarding how Europe and, ostensibly, the world should progress from the chaos of the 16th century religious wars to a rational future free from superstition. These ideas did not develop in a vacuum, so the course also investigates the political, economic, and social changes which both influenced and were influenced by Enlightenment ideals.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

HIST 129T. War and Society in Europe, 800-1500

This course will examine the warfare (and violence) as endemic features of European society, from ca. 800-1500. Rather than a broad sweep approach, it will examine particular events and topics within that framework, perhaps including things such as Charlemagne's conquests, the Crusades, civil unrest, the wards collectively called the Hundred Years' War, and others.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

HIST 129T. Anti-Semitism from the Medieval to Modern World

Examination and critical analysis of anti-Semitic thought and ideology from the medieval world to the present day. Studies the origins and effects of anti-Semitic views and writings in wider context, along with the impact of prejudice on Jewish communities around world.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

HIST 130. Europe in the 17th Century

European culture, society, and politics from 1600 to the death of Louis XIV.

Units: 3

HIST 131. Europe in the 18th Century

Intellectual, social, and political development of Europe from 1715 to the French Revolution and Napoleon Bonaparte.

Units: 3

HIST 132. Revolutionary Europe

History of Europe from the French Revolution to the Russian Revolution. Social and cultural consequences of Industrialization and the rise of Nationalism and Imperialism.

Units: 3

HIST 133. Europe in the 20th Century

Narrative and interpretive account of 20th century Europe. Stress on the impact of World War I, the Communist and Fascist Revolutions, the economic recovery of Europe, and the loss of European significance in the world after World War II.

Units: 3

HIST 134. 20th Century Dictators

This course provides an in-depth analysis of the most prominent authoritarian regimes of the 20th century. An in-depth summary of their rise to power, the fundamental aspects of their regime, their foreign policy, and the significance will be provided.

Units: 3

HIST 135. European Cultural History

Analysis of European thought from the Enlightenment to the present. Major movements in philosophy, religion, literature, art, and architecture; ideologies such as conservatism, liberalism, socialism, communism, nationalism, racism, and fascism. Emphasis on ideas of lasting and worldwide influence.

Units: 3

HIST 138. World War II: A Global Conflict

A detailed examination of the military, diplomatic, political, economic, social, and cultural impact of the Second World War. The causes, conduct, and consequences of the war are analyzed.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

HIST 139. European Diplomatic History 1890-1945

The conduct of foreign policy by European States, between 1890 and 1945, including alliances, conflicts, and treaties will be thoroughly examined and an understanding of the impact and limitations of foreign policy initiatives will be explored.

Units: 3

HIST 140. Holocaust

This course discusses the rise of National Socialism in Germany, the origins of the persecution and murder of Jews, ghettos, concentration and death camps in Germany and Eastern Europe, and the aftermath, including the Nuremberg Trials.

Units: 3

HIST 141. Modern Germany

Political and social developments from Bismarck to the present. Rise of Germany as a world power; failure of German democracy; Hitler and the Third Reich; politics of a divided Germany since 1945.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring - even

HIST 142. Tsarist Russia

The political, economic, and social history of Tsarist Russia from 862 to 1917.

Units: 3

HIST 143. Russia and Eurasia in the 20th Century

The political, economic, and social history of Russia and Eurasia from the rise of communism to the present. Examines the rise of communism and its political and social structures. Explores Soviet systems, arts, literature, the dissedent policies. Looks at the fall of communism, the end of the Soviet Union, and the new states that have emerged in its wake.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

HIST 144. Warfare in the Western World

This course focuses on the transformation of warfare by the advent of new technology, tactics and strategy, and the increasing ability to mobilize the entire resources and population of nations at war. Course covers U.S. Civil War, WWI, and WWII.

Units: 3

HIST 145. Spain and Portugal

Development of the Iberian Peninsula from prehistoric to modern times.

Units: 3

HIST 149T. Studies in Modern European History

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

HIST 149T. History of Russia and Soviet Film

Course will introduce students to 20th century Russian history through the lens of camera. The course will acquaint students with major cultural periods of the 20th century and will examine film as a lens to sociopolitical cultural events of the 20th century.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

HIST 149TZ. England from Chaucer to Shakespeare

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

HIST 150. England to 1485

Structure of the British government, society, and economic life from Roman times to The War of the Roses.

Units: 3

HIST 151. British Empire

Rise of England and the British nation; spread of the English-speaking peoples and the transfer of British institutions; from 1485 to the modern era.

Units: 3

HIST 152. British History in Film

Discussion and written historical analysis of selected cinematic masterpieces in British history, from Henry II to the modern era.

Units: 3-4

HIST 153. United States During the Cold War

Explores the political, social, cultural, military, and economic history of the U.S. during the Cold War.

Units: 3

HIST 156. U.S. Cultural History, 1877-Present

An examination of American culture from the late nineteenth century to the present, focusing on various cultural products and practices, both high and low. Formerly HIST 179T.

Units: 3

HIST 157. Modern Africa

The history of Africa since 1800. Topics given special attention include the slave trade and its abolition, European exploration, the imposition of European colonial rule, African nationalism, the struggle for independence and Africa's rise to prominence in world affairs.

Units: 3

HIST 158. The American Civil War

The causes of the Civil War (1861-1865) and its revolutionary consequences for American individuals and institutions. Attention devoted to military as well as political, economic, social, and cultural aspects of the war.

Units: 3

HIST 159. The Reconstruction of America, 1865-1900

Exploration of a critical period in which the United States sought to rebuild itself politically, socially, economically, and culturally in the thirty years after the Civil War. Topics will include emancipation, radical Reconstruction, urbanization, and the rise of the West.

Units: 3

HIST 160. The Great American Civilizations: Maya, Aztec, Inca

Historical examination of the rise and fall of the Maya, Aztec, and Inca empires. Social organization, religion, technology, art, and scientific achievements of the pre-Columbian great American civilizations.

Units: 3

HIST 162. South America

The history of South American republics, with an emphasis on such themes as in stability, economic development, political parties, and revolution.

Units: 3

HIST 164. 19th Century Mexico

This course examines the political, social, and economic development of Mexico from its independence from Spain in 1821 through the Mexican Revolution of 1910.

Units: 3

HIST 165. Modern Mexico

Nineteenth century origins of Mexican nationality. Development of modern Mexican culture from the Mexican Revolution to the present as compared to that of the Mexican American. Literature and art as an expression of the new Mexican culture.

Units: 3

HIST 166. United States -- Latin American Diplomacy

History of the relations between the United States and Latin America, ranging from the Monroe Doctrine through the Good Neighbor Policy, Alliance for Progress, and the Caribbean Basin Initiative.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall - odd

HIST 167. Social Revolution in Latin America

Highlights Mexico, Cuba, and Central America in exploring the origins, social constituencies, and consequences of the major 20th century Latin American revolutions. Examines the impact of counterrevolutionary movements, foreign intervention, and the successes and failures of each revolution.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring - odd

HIST 168. Latin American History in Film

Analyzes the manner in which major and controversial themes (race, class, gender, revolution, the military and underdevelopment) in Latin American history are portrayed in feature length films. Emphasis is given to the historical content and accuracy of the films.

Units: 3

HIST 169T. Studies in Latin American History

Intensive study of special topics.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

HIST 170. The American Colonies, 1607-1763

Social, cultural, and political developments in teh British North American colonies from the first contact between indigenous and European cultures to the eve of the American Revolution.

Units: 3

HIST 171. The American Revolution, 1763-1815

The course examines the causes, nature, and results of the American Revolution, which secured the independence of the United States and created the first republican government in the western hemisphere.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

HIST 172. Jacksonian America, 1815-1848

Explores the social, political, economic, and cultural developments that transformed the United States in the early nineteenth century. Topics will include the rise of mass democracy, the Second Party System, the Market Revolution, and the geographic expansion of the republic.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

HIST 173. United States History, 1865-1914

The development of an increasingly urban and industrialized society from Reconstruction to the eve of World War I.

Units: 3

HIST 174. United States History, 1914-1945

The United States in world affairs; political, economic, social, and cultural developments and problems from 1914 to 1945.

Units: 3

HIST 175. United States History, 1945-Present

The United States in world affairs; political, economic, social, and cultural developments, and problems from 1945 to present.

Units: 3

HIST 176. The Atlantic World, 1500 - 1800

Economic, social, political, and religious histories - Europe, Africa, North and South America between the 15th and 19th centuries.

Units: 3

HIST 177. American History in Film

Analysis of significant films and documentaries on controversial aspects of American history. Emphasis given to placing film content in an historiographical framework. Offered especially, but not exclusively, for prospective teachers.

Units: 3

HIST 178. History of African Americans

(HIST 178 same as AFRS 178.)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

HIST 179T. Studies in United States History

Intensive study of special topics.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

HIST 180. History and Autobiography

An examination of the uses of first-person narratives in understanding American history. Attention to a diverse collection of writers as well as the social context and narrative conventions that shaped their autobiographies. Formerly HIST 179T

Units: 3

HIST 182. Westward Movement Since 1848

Patterns of exploitation; role of the federal government in the West: land policy, Indian policy; problems of communication; economic growth.

Units: 3

HIST 183. The Hispanic Southwest

Exploration, conquest, and settlement of the Spanish Borderlands from 1513 to the Mexican War; contributions of Hispanic culture to the Southwest.

Units: 3

HIST 186. American Immigration and Ethnic History

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Covers America, land of immigrants. American immigration policy, regulations, and implementation. Ethnic formation and heritage retention or loss. Pluralism, assimilation, and national unity: e pluribus unum. G.E. Multicultural/International MI.

Units: 3
GE Area: M/I

HIST 187. California History

Explores California history from before the Spanish conquest to the present. Themes include the cultural, social, political, and economic practices of the various immigrant and indigenous groups that have occupied the state. (Formerly Hist 188 and 189)

Units: 3

HIST 188. Regional and Local History

Regional and local history an oral history component. Students will conduct interviews focusing on the daily lives and contributions of individuals within diverse communities.

Units: 3

HIST 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement --Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

HIST 191. Modern Far East, 1843-1949

Not open to students with credit in HIST 191A. History of the Far East from the conclusion of the Opium War to the eve of Chinese Communist Revolution. Particular emphasis on China, Japan, and Korea.

Units: 3

HIST 192. Modern Far East, 1949-Present

Not open to students with credit in HIST 191B. History of the Far East from the success of the Chinese Communist Revolution in 1949 to the present. Particular emphasis on China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam.

Units: 3

HIST 193. Internship in History

Supervised work experience in a history related field, the internship relates the student's classroom studies to occupational and professional experiences.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

HIST 194. The United States and Vietnam

Explores political, social, cultural, military, and economic history of U.S. involvement in Southeast Asia, with particular emphasis on Vietnam.

Units: 3

HIST 199T. Studies in Far Eastern History

Intensive study in special topics.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

HIST 199T. Empire in Asia

Before the territorial expansion and accompanying colonialism of European 'states' in the 19th century, strong Asian 'empires', sometimes referred to as gunpowder empires -- the Ottomans, the Safavids, the Mughals, and the Qing -- ruled Asia. Whereas these powerful leaders inspired admiration and fear in Europeans before 1800, the Ottoman and Qing empires were dubbed the "sick man of Europe" and the "sick man of Asia" by the end of the 19th century. Were their structures unfit for a modern world? Were Asian empires backward in comparison to European ones?

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

HIST 200A. Introduction to Graduate Writing and Historiography

Introduction to the methods and skills of graduate writing. Introduction to the varieties of history writings from the ancient world to early-modern times, focusing especially on major themes, approaches, and categories of history writing and authors. (Formerly HIST 200)

Units: 3

HIST 200B. Introduction to Graduate Research and Historiography

Introduction to the methods and skills of graduate research. Introduction to the varieties of modern history writing, focusing especially on major theses, approaches, and categories of history writing, and major figures in modern historical debates. (Formerly HIST 200)

Units: 3

HIST 200C. Introduction to Graduate Research

Provides students with a working knowledge of modern historiography and various approaches to history within the discipline. Students will begin to master the skills of professional historical research.

Units: 3

HIST 210T. Topics in United States History

Intensive reading, analysis, and discussion of significant historical problems in United States history.

Units: 3

HIST 210T. American Immigration and Ethnic History

This course will provide close reading and in-depth discussion of carefully selected monographs and essays that explore the historic and current nature of immigration with emphasis on the impact of ethnicity, race, gender, and class in creating an American identity. During the semester we will discuss readings on topics such as the conditions leading to European emigration, the process of assimilation, the invention of ethnicity, the transnational experience of immigrant women and others. Reading for the course will draw from both historical and interdisciplinary frameworks to better understand how historians have studied these issues in different ways over time.

Units: 3

HIST 210T. American Revolutions

Students will become familiar with the major historiographical debates surrounding the revolutions and rebellions of north and South America in the late 18th century.

Units: 3

HIST 220T. Topics in European History

Intensive examination of methodological and theoretical issues pertaining to the advanced study of diverse topics in European history.

Units: 3

HIST 220T. Identity, Memory, and Russian History

This course will explore the changing perceptions of what it means to be Russia/Russian from the French Revolution to the present. We will explore issues of perception, issues, of memory, and issues of belonging. We will explore Russian's place in the geopolitical system as perceived by the West and as perceived by Russia.

Units: 3

HIST 220T. World War Two

This course will examine German and Allied strategy and Tactics Europe during WWII. Specific aspects of the military campaigns in Poland and France will be analyzed using extensive primary source material as well as notable secondary sources.

Units: 3

HIST 230T. Topics in World History

Intensive reading, analysis and discussion of selected problems in World history

Units: 3

HIST 230T. Nationalism in Latin America

This course examines the key historiographical tradition in the firled of Latin American history.

Units: 3

HIST 230T. The Use and Abuse of the Early Modern World Period, 1500-1800

The idea of an "early modern world" has come into common use in various historical fields despite historians' lack of enthusiasm for it as a concept. The late Frederic Wakeman angrily denounced Rowe's enthusiastic embrace, lamenting the implications of teleology and Eurocentrism that accompany said periodization. This debate offers the perfect opportunity for a fresh look upon re-chewed historical paradigms and a desire to achieve a balance between the local and the global.

Units: 3

HIST 290. Independent Study

See Academic Placement --Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

HIST 292. Directed Readings

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Readings on selected themes and topics in consultation with a faculty adviser.

Units: 1-3

HIST 296. Topics in History for Teachers

Course integrates historical theory and "best practices" with practical historical knowledge and curricular development. Introduces teachers to historical resources and discusses history pedagogy to integrate current historical scholarship into intermediate and secondary history curricula.

Units: 1-3

HIST 297. Internship in History

Supervised work experience in a history-related field. Provides occupational and professional work experience in one of the following ways: conduct and present original research; engage in archival or museum-related work; or prepare and present original lectures in a classroom setting.

Units: 1-3

HIST 298. Project

Preparation, completion and submission of an acceptable project for the MA teaching option.

Units: 3

HIST 298C. Project Continuation

Pre-requisite: Project HIST 298. For continuous enrollment while completing the project. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

HIST 299A. Thesis

Prerequisite: See Criteria for Thesis and Project. Preparation, completion, and submission of an acceptable thesis for the master's degree. (A) Thesis design. (B) Thesis writing. A and B may be taken concurrently. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 3

HIST 299B. Thesis

Prerequisite: See Criteria for Thesis and Project. Preparation, completion, and submission of an acceptable thesis for the master's degree. (A) Thesis design. (B) Thesis writing. A and B may be taken concurrently. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 3

HIST 299C. Thesis Continuation

Pre-requisite: Thesis HIST 299. For continuous enrollment while completing the thesis. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

Requirements

Master of Arts Degree Requirements

(See Division of Graduate Studies.)

Graduate history courses are open only to program students or by instructor's permission.

The History Department offers a 30-unit Master of Arts program with a traditional track and a teaching option.

Teaching Option

A. Core (15 units)
HIST 200A, 200B, HIST 210T, 220T, 230T
Note: HIST 200A/B must be taken within the first year of enrollment in the history program.

B. Electives (6 units)
Students will select 6 additional units from HIST 210T, 220T, 230T. (Students may repeat course numbers but may not repeat topics.)

C. Practicum (6 units)
HIST 296 and 297

D. Culminating Experience (3 units)
Project: HIST 298

Total (30 units)

Foreign Language Requirement. Students on the traditional track (either Thesis or Examination choice) must pass a reading competency examination in at least one foreign language approved by the graduate adviser before being advanced to candidacy. With the prior approval of the graduate adviser, a foreign language readings course may be substituted for the exam.

Graduate Writing Requirement. History graduate students in all tracks/options must fulfill the Graduate Writing Requirement (see graduate program coordinator for more information.)

Graduate Program

The Master of Arts program in History is designed to extend the competence of persons engaged in a wide variety of fields requiring a broad grasp of historical knowledge, techniques, and interpretation. Within this degree program, students may choose to complete either a traditional track or a teaching option. The traditional track, which offers both thesis and examination as possible culminating experiences, best satisfies the needs of those interested in public service, teaching at the community college level, or pursuing advanced graduate study in history. The teaching option best satisfies the needs of those interested in enhancing their teaching of history primarily at the secondary level.

The Graduate Certificate program is most suitable for those teachers who would like to update their professional credentials, those seeking supplemental certification, those seeking to prepare for the CSET, and/or those who would simply like to continue their study of history but who do not require an M.A.

Prerequisites. Admission to the Master of Arts degree program in History assumes undergraduate preparation equivalent to this university's major in history. Majors from other disciplines may qualify for admission depending on grade point average and other factors deemed pertinent for success in historical studies. The department determines in each case whether the applicant needs additional preparation before receiving classified standing. Applicants to the Teaching Option must have either a teaching credential or special approval from the graduate coordinator prior to applying.

Graduate Writing Requirement. The graduate writing requirement will be met by submission of a 15- to 20-page research paper formatted according to disciplinary style. The graduate writing committee will meet twice a year -- November 15 and March 14 -- to assess student writing. Detailed guidelines can be found in the Department of History's Graduate Student Handbook or by consulting the graduate coordinator.

Faculty

The Department of History has more than 15 faculty members offering a wide variety of courses in the history of Europe, the United States, Latin America, the British Empire, Africa, the Middle East, and the Far East, as well as courses in intellectual and cultural history, social history, military history, and the history of women.

Name Degree Email Phone
Anderson, Donald K Master of Arts donalda@csufresno.edu 559.278.2153
Arvanigian, Mark E Doctor of Philosophy marvanig@csufresno.edu 559.278.2297
Cady, Daniel Doctor of Philosophy dcady@csufresno.edu 559.278.6817
Carden, M A Doctor of Philosophy acarden@csufresno.edu 559.278.2153
Chang, Sidney H Doctor of Philosophy schang@csufresno.edu 559.278.2153
Clune, Lori A Doctor of Philosophy lclune@csufresno.edu 559.278.8895
Coomes, Mary L Doctor of Philosophy mcoomes@csufresno.edu
Creviston, Vernon P Master of Arts vcreviston@csufresno.edu 559.278.2153
DenBeste, Michelle D Doctor of Philosophy mdenbest@csufresno.edu 559.278.5154
Farrell, John P Doctor of Philosophy jfarrell@csufresno.edu 559.278.7346
Fields, Jill S Doctor of Philosophy jfields@csufresno.edu 559.278.5414
Jessie, Mildred M Master of Arts mjessie@csufresno.edu 559.278.2153
Johnson, Andrea S Doctor of Philosophy anjohnson@csufresno.edu 559.278.6792
Jones, Bradley Doctor of Philosophy brajones@csufresno.edu 559.278.2351
Jordine, Melissa R Doctor of Philosophy mjordine@csufresno.edu 559.278.5418
Kytle, Ethan J Doctor of Philosophy ekytle@csufresno.edu 559.278.6876
Lopez, Maritere Doctor of Philosophy mariterel@csufresno.edu 559.278.2601
Maischak, Lars Doctor of Philosophy lmaischak@csufresno.edu 559.278.2153
Reese, DeAnna J Doctor of Philosophy dreese@csufresno.edu 559.278.6358
Rivera, Alicia J Master of Arts alrivera@csufresno.edu
Roberts, Kathleen B Doctor of Philosophy broberts@csufresno.edu 559.278.8677
Sischo, Robin A Master of Arts rsischo@csufresno.edu
Skuban, William Doctor of Philosophy weskuban@csufresno.edu 559.278.2153
Torosian, Kathleen Bachelor of Arts katorosian@csufresno.edu
Vallis, Annamarie Master of Arts avallis@csufresno.edu 559.278.2153
Vermote, Frederik Doctor of Philosophy fvermote@csufresno.edu