Geography, Minor

Department

Department of Geography & City & Regional Planning

Segun O. Ogunjemiyo, Chair
Science Building, Room 182
559.278.2797
www.fresnostate.edu/socialsciences/geography

Degrees and Programs Offered

BA in Geography, B.A.
MN in Geography, Minor
MN in Meteorology, Minor
MN in Urban Studies, Minor

The world of the 21st century is a place where there are very complex interactions between an increasingly fragile environment and the people who make up the many varied and diverse cultures on it. Geographers are uniquely trained to "see the big picture" so that they can more fully understand these complex interactions of the environment and the many cultures of humankind.

The Geography Department offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in geography, a minor in geography, a minor in meteorology, and an interdisciplinary minor in urban studies. The geography course offerings support undergraduate preparation for careers in environmental study, teaching, weather, regional and urban planning, and preparation for graduate work.

Central to geographic inquiry is a concern with the human occupancy of the earth, the character of the human environment, and the interrelationships that link humans and the physical world. In sum, geography seeks to provide a broad understanding of the world, its people, and its problems. Geography seeks to provide applied specializations and technical skills that can address economic, social, and environmental problems at scales that range from local to global by employing a spatial framework for organizational purposes analogous to the chronological framework employed in history.

Geography integrates much information from the natural and social sciences and because of the diversity of subject matter from which it obtains data, offers a broad, liberal education applicable to many fields of employment.

The department offers a variety of courses that allow students to address different objectives. First, we provide, for both majors and non-majors alike, a greater understanding of the world as an element of a liberal education which has become an increasingly important component of a complete university education. Second, we provide courses that assure a depth of knowledge in subject matter and technique for majors and minors in geography. Third, we serve those students in related disciplines who wish to strengthen programs of study through a selection of courses in geography.

Although there are no options in the degree program, students may select courses that focus on various areas of study.

Examples of such focused study areas could include the following:

  • Geographic Studies: Coursework for the student interested in the world and its spatial patterns. Traditional study which may lead to graduate work and a career in higher education, or with local, state, and federal agencies utilizing geographic analysis, including the use of geographic information systems (GIS).
  • Environmental Studies: Coursework to develop competence in environmental techniques with particular emphasis on such topics as meteorology, pollution, environmental impact analysis, geographic information systems (GIS), and human-environment relationships may lead to graduate work in geography, or employment in various state and federal agencies dealing with environmental problems.
  • Urban and Regional Planning: Coursework for the student interested in the study of how to create communities that balance new development and essential services, environmental protection and innovative change and which may lead to graduate work and a career with local or state agencies. Courses could cover a wide range of subjects including planning, environmental studies, legal issues, and geographic information systems (GIS).

Students must regularly consult with their academic adviser. Such consultation will facilitate course selection and enable the student to develop a program consistent with individual interests and needs.

Facilities

A laboratory facility is available for student use. The Urban Planning and Environmental Research Laboratory is a 32-station, state-of-the-art, computer laboratory used for instruction and research in urban planning, geographic information systems (GIS), environmental studies, remote sensing, and a variety of other applications.

Courses

Geography & City & Regnl Plnng

GEOG 2. Introduction to Cultural Geography

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. General background to cultural geography, including origins of cultural land scapes, man's modification of the natural environment, and problems of population and settlement geography. G.E. Breadth D3. (CAN GEOG 4)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall - even
GE Area: D3

GEOG 4. World Geography

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. Survey of world-wide social, cultural, economic and political forces; earth's physical features; economic development; cultural and natural resources; man-land relationships. Applicable concepts and methodologies. Approach is by continents and/or cultural realms. G.E. Breadth D3.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: D3

GEOG 5. Physical Geography: Global Concepts, Weather and Climate

The earth as a planet, map projections, location on the earth's surface, time, oceans, weather, and climate.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

GEOG 7. Physical Geography: The Earth's Surface

A survey of those elements of the physical environment at the earth-atmosphere contact. Fundamentals of landform features, soils, natural vegetation, and water bodies.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

GEOG 20. Introduction to Spatial Techniques

Introduction to spatial/geographical techniques, including cartography, topographical map reading, geographical information systems, and aerial photo interpretation.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

GEOG 25. Critical Thinking in Geography

Fundamentals of critical thinking with emphasis on: evaluating claims, geographical and cultural influences on perception, constructing arguments, deductive and inductive reasoning, recognizing fallacies and persuasive rhetoric, and explanations. These skills are applied to select topics drawn from various geographical contexts.

Units: 3
GE Area: A3

GEOG 30. Introduction to Spatial Statistics

Introduction of elementary statistical principles and techniques: probability theory, sampling, descriptive statistics, spatial statistics, hypothesis testing, correlation analysis, bivariate regression, and forecasting. (Formerly GEOG 110) (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

GEOG 111. Meteorology

Prerequisites: MATH 75 (or equivalent) and GEOG 5 (or equivalent). Study of the earth's atmosphere; energy exchanges and temperature; pressure and air circulation; fog, clouds, precipitation and the hydrologic cycle; cyclonic storms and orographic processes; stability and thunderstorms; weather modification and predictions with application to agriculture, aviation and other activities.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall - even

GEOG 112. Climatology

Prerequisites: MATH 75 (or equivalent) and GEOG 5 (or equivalent). Study of various systems of climate classification. Climates as they exist throughout the world and the reasons for their occurrence.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring - odd

GEOG 114. Micrometeorology

(GEOG 114 same as PLANT 134.) Prerequisites: MATH 75 (or equivalent) and GEOG 5 (or equivalent), or permission of instructor. Micrometeorological influences on local climates including natural ecosystems and varying agricultural canopies. Local climate influences on wildlife, domestic animals, and humans. Manipulation of local climate including frost protection, irrigation and wind sheltering. Microclimates of non-uniform terrain and urban environment.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall - odd

GEOG 115. Violent Weather/Climatic Hazards

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area B. Studies hurricanes, tornadoes, thunderstorms, lightning, destructive winds, heat waves, drought, severe winter storms, and floods. Looks at physical laws and processes that account for their formation and behavior; examines human impact. G.E. Integration IB.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: IB

GEOG 118. Air Quality Meteorology

This course examines the sources, effects, and regulation of air pollutants; and the roles of meteorology in air pollution. Topics covered include air pollution sources and sinks, atmospheric systems and pollutant transport, welfare and health effects of air pollution.

Units: 3

GEOG 122. Introduction to Biogeography

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area B, and GEOG 30 (or equivalent). Examination of the living planet and global patterns of life. Topics covered include evolution, biodiversity, extinction, conservation, and impacts of global change on our planet's biosphere. (Formerly GEOG 117.)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall - even

GEOG 127. Global Environmental Change

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area B. Effects of human activities on the natural world from ancient times to the present with emphasis on local, regional, and global environmental changes and their implications for the future.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring - even

GEOG 128. Environmental Pollution

Prerequisites: completion of G.E. Foundation and Area B. Breadth requirements. A discussion of current environmental pollution problems involving the atmosphere, land, and water. The adverse effects of transportation, surface mining, sewage and water disposal, noise, the use of pesticides, energy production and consumption, and related topoics are examined.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: IB

GEOG 132. United States Environmental Law

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D, and junior standing. Contemporary environmental problems and their interrelationships. The conceptual, constitutional, and administrative framework for environmental protection and management. Legislation and case law for the protection and enhancement of the environment with emphasis on natural resources. (Formerly CRP 135).

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring - odd

GEOG 135. Environmental Protection

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. An examination of the plight of nature; the values of nature preserved; man's attempt to preserve nature. Attention focuses on the national park movement, wilderness, endangered species, the management of lands for the purpose of preservation, and related topics.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring - odd

GEOG 139T. Environmental Regions

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Systematic and regional investigation of the physical and cultural complexes of various environmental regions. Regions to be discussed include the Humid Tropics, Arid Lands, Polar Lands, Coastal Lands, Mountain Environments, Island Environments. (Formerly GEOG 145T)

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 9 units

GEOG 140. Computer Cartography

Map design and production in a computer environment: business graphics, desktop publishing, computer-aided design, thematic mapping, three-dimensional surfaces, and graphic programming. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours) (Formerly GEOG 102).

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring - odd

GEOG 141. GIS I: Data Display and Manipulation

Prerequisites: GEOG 30 (or equivalent) or permission of instructor. Use of computers in mapping and geographic information systems applications. Operational knowledge of boundary and attribute data manipulation, spatial query, geocoding, and layout using state-of-the-art mapping and geographic information systems software. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours) (Formerly GEOG 101).

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

GEOG 142. GIS II: Data Creation and Project Implementation

Prerequisite: GEOG 141 or permission of instructor. Fundamental concepts of acquisition, structure, manipulation, and analysis of GIS data. Practice in the design, management, and implementation of GIS. Specific operational knowledge may include georegistration, boundary and attribute file creation, map development, spatial query, and spatial analysis. (2 lecture, 1 lab) (Formerly GEOG 107).

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

GEOG 143. GIS III: Spatial Analysis and Modeling

Prerequisite: GEOG 142 or permission of instructor. Spatial analysis and modeling in a GIS environment. Spatial geometry, pattern analysis, terrain analysis, path analysis, network analysis, surface modeling, spatial autocorrelation, and spatial interpolation. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours) (Formerly GEOG 108).

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall - odd

GEOG 149. Technical Field Geography

Prerequisite: Geography major or permission of instructor. Gathering and analysis of data pertaining to topics in physical or human geography. Includes an on-campus seminar to discuss issues and concepts. (1 lecture, 4-8 field hours) (Formerly GEOG 109).

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring - odd

GEOG 150. Map Interpretation

Prerequisites:G.E. Foundation B3, MATH 5 (or equivalent), GEOG 7, and GEOG 30 or permission of instructor. Reading and interpretation of USGS-type topographic maps. Emphasis on interpretative inference concerning both physical and cultural landscapes. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours) (Formerly GEOG 104).

Units: 3

GEOG 151. Aerial Photograph Interpretation

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation B4; MATH 5 (or equivalent); GEOG 7, GEOG 30 (or equivalent) or permission of instructor. Introduction to aerial imagery interpretation, videography, multispectral scanner technology; computer-based digital processing; monitoring and mapping of terrain features; georeferencing (GPS); GIS applications. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours) (Formerly GEOG 105).

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

GEOG 152. Remote Sensing I: Intro to Remote Sensing of Environment

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation Breadth and Area B; MATH 5 (or equivalent); GEOG 7, GEOG 30 (or equivalent) or permission of instructor. Introductory techniques of remote sensing; including digital image processing; advanced GIS applications. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours) (Formerly GEOG 106).

Units: 3

GEOG 160. Urban Geography

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. The city environment. An understanding of the changing urban environments from ancient through medieval to modern times; the relationship of the urban center to its surrounding hinterland; the interdependence of its functional parts; its problems and future.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall - even

GEOG 161. Historical Geography of the United States

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Regional settlement of the United States; peopling of physiographic regions, creation of economic (cultural) regions, and geographic factors related to broad trends in American history.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

GEOG 162. Political Geography

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Systematic treatment of the nature and structure of states, boundary problems, political policy for the oceans, international power, air space.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall - even

GEOG 163. World Crises

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Current major political, economic, and environmental crises occurring on either a global or a regional level.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring - odd

GEOG 164. American Ethnic Geography

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Geographical analysis of selected American ethnic groups to include their cultural hearths, cultural landscapes, cultural evolutions, migrations, and current spatial distributions. Economic, social, and political correlates will be explored.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall - odd

GEOG 165. Medical Geography

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Examination of spatial patterns of diseases worldwide, with special emphasis on diffusion patterns for infectious diseases. Analysis of global health care delivery systems including health care resources, accessibility, and uses. (Formerly GEOG 155).

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring - even

GEOG 166. Geography of World Economy

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. An examination of the organization of world economy and human economic activities from a geographical perspective. Discussion of contemporary economic issues may include industrial restructuring, technological innovation, foreign trade and investment, Pacific Asia dynamism, Third World crisis, new international economic order, regional inequality, and local area development. (Formerly GEOG 130).

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall - odd

GEOG 167. People and Places-A Global Perspective

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Contrasting characteristics of a diverse world; influence of major social, cultural, economic, and political forces on societal behavior and institutions; impacts of geographical factors including location, climate, natural resources, urbanization, diffusion/adoption of innovations, and rural/urban lifestyles on development. G.E. Multicultural/International MI.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: M/I

GEOG 170T. Latin American Regions

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Geography of Latin America. Relationship of cultural and natural features; social and economic development; man-land relationships. Regions to be discussed include Mexico, Central America, Caribbean Islands, and South America.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 9 units

GEOG 171T. Anglo-American Regions

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Examination of the physical, economic, and cultural geographic foundations of major Anglo-American regions. Regions to be discussed include Canada, the United States, the American West, the South, the Middle West, and the North East. (Formerly 166T).

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 9 units

GEOG 173. The American West

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Physical and human geography of the western continental United States. Occupance of the region, both historically and in contemporary times, by different peoples including Indians, Hispanics, Anglos, and others. Examines population, land and resource use, urban centers, and subdivision of the American West. G.E. Integration ID. (Formerly GEOG 169).

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: ID

GEOG 174. European Regions

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Geographic regions of Europe emphasizing the relation of human activities to physical factors areal in their distribution and influence. Regions to be discussed include Mediterranean lands, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Central Europe, Northern Europe, the British isles.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 9 units

GEOG 175T. African Regions

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Study of major African regions relating to basic physical, cultural, economic, and political geographic conditions and problems. Regions to be discussed include Developing Black Africa, North Africa, West Africa, East Africa, Central Africa, and Southern Africa. (Formerly GEOG 181T).

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 9 units

GEOG 177T. Asian Regions

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Geographic regions of Asia emphasizing physical and cultural features. Regions to be discussed include Southeast Asia, South Asia, China, and the Far East.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 9 units

GEOG 178. Geography of California

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Natural and cultural patterns of California; historical and regional geography of the state. (Formerly GEOG 168).

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring - even

GEOG 179. Geography of the Middle East

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Comprehensive study of the physical features of the Middle East and the cultural traits of its people. The area under consideration extends from the Turkish Straits to the Pamir Knot, and from the Caucasus to the Sudan.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall - odd

GEOG 181. Introduction to Urban Planning

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Introduction to and critical analysis of theory and practice of community planning; traditional and alternative roles of planning in contemporary society; perspectives on community problems; evaluation of concepts, literature, and history.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

GEOG 184. Environmental Planning

Introductory course that covers the fundamental concepts of environmental planning at the federal, state, and local level. The interrelationships among residents, working landscapes, and protected areas, and society's need to protect valuable natural resources will be covered.

Units: 3

GEOG 187T. Topics in Urban Planning Techniques

Selected topics such as analytical techniques; means for management of urban development, including transportation, public facilities, and activities in the private sector; public policy concerning issues of local and regional significance. (Formerly CRP 110T).

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Spring - even

GEOG 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

GEOG 191T. Environmental Impact Assessment

This course investigates guidelines, processes, procedures, and implementation of environmental impact assessment (EIA) used to assess a project through technical, economic, and social analysis of its effects in natural environment. The objective is to provide familiarity with EIA considered in granting permission for creation of infrastructure, public facilities, and developmental work. Topics consist of background of EIA; policy and institutional framework; public participation, screening, and scoping; forecast and appraisal of impacts; impact management and mitigation techniques; and EIA preparation decision making. Students understand to create, critique, and review EIA and the decision making processes via issue specific case studies.

Units: 3

GEOG 191T. Topics in Geography

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Selected topics in cultural, physical, environmental, or economic geography or in geographic techniques. (Formerly GEOG 188T).

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 9 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

GEOG 192. Directed Readings

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Supervised readings in a selected field of geography. Combined units of GEOG 190 and GEOG 192 may not exceed 6 units. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

GEOG 195. Field Geography

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Weekend, semester break, or summer field trips. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 1-6
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Requirements

Geography Minor

GEOG 4 (3 units)
GEOG 5 or 7 (3 units)
GEOG 167 (3 units)
Select from upper-division geography* (12 units)
Total (21 units)

* No more than 3 units earned in GEOG 195 may be applied to the minor. Students completing a Minor in Geography are encouraged to seek faculty advice relative to course selection and program planning.

Faculty

Instruction at introductory and advanced levels is conducted by a faculty whose teaching and research interests are diverse. All major facets of the discipline are represented as are a number of specializations, which include medical geography, economic studies of China, urban revitalization, political ecology of natural resource management, environmental monitoring using remote sensing, urban air quality, urban and regional planning, environmental planning, and climate change and global governance.

Name Degree Email Phone
Boyd, Sean P Bachelor of Arts seboyd@csufresno.edu 559.278.1636
Calvarese, Michelle Doctor of Philosophy mcalvare@csufresno.edu 559.278.2836
Dangi, Mohan B Doctor of Philosophy mdangi@csufresno.edu 559.278.4857
Dong, Hongwei Doctor of Philosophy hdong@csufresno.edu 559.278.2890
Leung, Chi K Doctor of Philosophy cleung@csufresno.edu
McFeeters, Stuart K Doctor of Philosophy smcfeeters@csufresno.edu
Ogunjemiyo, Segun Doctor of Philosophy sogunjemiyo@csufresno.edu 559.278.6897
Omolayo, Aribilola S Doctor of Philosophy samuelo@csufresno.edu 559.278.2797
Woodcock, Keith J Master of City Planning kewoodcock@csufresno.edu 559.278.5236