English, Minor

Department

Department of English

Lisa Weston, Chair
Peters Business Building, Room 382
559.278.2553
FAX: 559.278.7143
www.fresnostate.edu/english/

Degrees and Programs Offered

BA in English - English Major Option, B.A.
BA in English - English Education Option, B.A.
CERT in Composition, Certificate of Adv. Study
CRED in Single Subject Credential - English
MA in English - Composition Theory Option, M.A.
MA in English - Literature Option, M.A.
MA in English-Literature & Composition Theory Option, M.A.
MFA in Creative Writing, M.F.A.
MN in English, Minor
MN in Creative Writing, Minor

English is a general major or minor designed to give proficiency in skills that traditionally have been among the most highly prized by society: an ability to read with comprehension and critical judgment; to communicate accurately and clearly both orally and in writing; to grasp difficult ideas and think logically; to do research and organize materials; to make ethical and moral judgments from an historical and humanistic framework; and to appreciate literature and the arts.

The core of the English major consists of four basic kinds of courses in the upper division: literary history courses, literary genre courses, literacy seminars, and writing courses. The masterpiece courses apply to the minor and may meet General Education requirements. The department also offers courses in mythology and folklore, methods of research, film, and women's studies.

The Subject Matter Program for teaching credential candidates contains a number of specific prerequisites and special required courses, some of which are outside the Department of English. For specific program requirements, consult with the credential adviser each semester.

Courses

English

CI 161. Mth Mtl Engl

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 999 units

EHD 154B. Final Student Teaching Seminar - English

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in EHD 155B. Seminar to accompany final student teaching that provides opportunities for candidates to investigate and discuss variety of topics and strategies and to reflect on issues that surface during their student teaching experience.

Units: 1

EHD 155B. Studt Tchg Engl

Prerequisites: admission to student teaching, EHD 155A, CI 161 (or concurrently, depending on major departmental policy); senior or post baccalaureate standing; approval of major department including subject matter competency approval; completion of the subject matter preparation program or passing the subject matter examination(s) designated by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. Supervised teaching in single subject classroom; assignment is for the full day; five days per week. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 5-10, Repeatable up to 999 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL RS. Writing Skills Application

Covers fundamental composition elements to aid the development of basic writing skills; not applicable toward baccalaureate degree requirements. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 1-3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 1L. Writing Tutorial

May be taken concurrently with ENGL 5A, ENGL 5B, ENGL 10, or ENGL 160W. Students work in a small group of two-three students and a tutor discussing writing assignments and collaborating by giving each other feedback and sharing strategies for revision. The tutor acts as a "personal trainer" by helping understand and fulfill the demands of your assignments according to your individual needs. CR/NC grading only. (2 hours)

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 3 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 2. Writing Workshop

Practical assignments and individual coaching on specific writing problems. For selected students this workshop may be required to be taken concurrently with, or as prerequisite to, other courses.

Units: 1-4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 5A. Academic Literacy I

Practice in reading and writing processes, making literacy decisions based on audience, context, and purpose. Direct instruction on reading comprehension; genre analysis; planning, composing and revising writing; research strategies; paragraph development, sentence competence, and grammatical conventions. With ENGL 5B, equivalent o ENGL 10. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 5B. Academic Literacy II

Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 5A with a grade of C or better. Continued study of reading and writing in various genres. Focus on research, analysis, synthesis, argument, and evaluation. Students guided to analyze the rhetorical qualities of academic literacy and language. Longer papers, portfolio assessment. G.E. Foundation A2.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: A2

ENGL 10. Accelerated Academic Literacy

Reading and writing in academic and public genres, special attention to rhetorical decision-making and critical analysis. Guided instruction in reading and responding to texts. Participation in public and academic conversations via research in primary and secondary sources. (Formerly English 1)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: A2

ENGL 20. Introduction to Literature

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2 (ENGL 5B OR ENGL 10). Introduction to literary appreciation and criticism through reading and close written analyses of short stories, novels, drama, and poetry from diverse Western and non-Western cultures. G.E. Breadth C2. (CAN ENGL 4)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: C2

ENGL 30. Masterpieces

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation A2 (ENGL 5B OR ENGL 10). Introduction to literary appreciation and criticism through discussion and written analyses of widely influential poetic, dramatic, and fictional works by British, American, and world authors (Western and non-Western), including the contexts for those works. G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: C2

ENGL 31. Reading in British Literature

Prerequisites: ENGL 5B or ENGL 10. Chronological survey of British Literature from medieval to contemporary. Discussion and written analyses of influential poetry, drama, fiction and nonfiction, including historical and cultural contexts. Required for English majors.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 32. Readings in American Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL 5 or ENGL 10. Chronlogical survey of U.S. Literature from Native American oral traditions to contemporary. Discussion and written analyses of influential poetry, drama, fiction and nonfiction., including historical and cultural contexts. Required for English majors.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 41. Poetry Writing

Beginning workshop in the writing of poetry; appropriate reading and analyses. G.E. Breadth C1.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: C1

ENGL 43. Fiction Writing

Beginning workshop in the writing of fiction; appropriate reading and analyses. G.E. Breadth C1.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: C1

ENGL 44. Creative Nonfiction Writing

Beginning workshop in lyric essay, memoir, and other forms of creative nonfiction writing; appropriate readings and analysis. G.E. Breadth C1.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: C1

ENGL 50T. Studies in Literature

(Same as WS 50T, Women in Novels section.) Prerequisite: ENGL 5 or ENGL 10. Sections designated as emphasizing certain writers, types, or themes, e.g., Shakespeare, The Poem, Literature of Protest, Women in Novels. Appropriate readings and analyses.

Units: 1-4, Repeatable up to 8 units

ENGL 100W. Writing Skills

Credit obtained only by passing Upper-Division Writing Skills Examination and upon request. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 101. Masterpieces of World Literature

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area C. Discussion and written analyses of influential poetry, drama, fiction, and nonfiction (in translation) from throughout the world, including historical and cultural contexts. Not applicable to the English major. G.E. Integration IC.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: IC

ENGL 102. Masterpieces of English Literature

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area C. Discussion and written analyses of influential poetry, drama, fiction, and non-fiction by British authors as well as colonial and post-colonial works influenced by English literature. Historical and cultural contexts of literary works. Not applicable to the English major. G.E. Integration IC.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: IC

ENGL 102WZ. Masterpieces of English Literature

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area C. Discussion and written analyses of influential poetry, drama, fiction, and non-fiction by British authors as well as colonial and post-colonial works influenced by English literature. Historical and cultural contexts of literary works. Not applicable to the English major. G.E. Integration IC.

Units: 4
GE Area: IC

ENGL 103. Masterpieces of American Literature

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area C. Discussion and written analyses of influential drama, fiction, and nonfiction by American authors and representing the cultural diversity of the nation. Historical and social contexts of literary works. Not applicable to the English major. G.E. Integration IC.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: IC

ENGL 104. Children's and Adolescent Literature

Survey of the major forms and genres of children's literature. Designed primarily for future elementary school teachers. May not be used for credit toward the English major.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 105. Introduction to Literary Analysis

Prerequisite: ENGL 31 and ENGL 32. The theory and practice of literary analysis. Examination of the concept of literary tradition; consideration of research methods; application of critical theory to textual analysis and the writing of literary criticism. Required for English majors.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 112. World Literature: Ancient

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area C. Analysis of texts (in translation) from c. 1650 BCE-750 CE, from areas such as China, India, Egypt, Israel, Greece, and Rome. Possible topics: epics and empires, civilization and wilderness, lyric experience, dramatizations of love and terror, and quests for wisdom. G.E. Integration IC.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: IC

ENGL 113. World Literature: Medieval and Renaissance

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area C. Analysis of texts (in translation) from c. 750-1650, from areas such as Japan, Mali, Mexico, Spain and Persia. Possible topics: travelers' tales and intercultural encounters, satire and social critique, poetic and narrative self-fashioning, patronage and eroticism in court poetry. G.E. Integration IC.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: IC

ENGL 114. World Literature: Modern

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area C. Analysis of texts (Anglophone and in translation) from c.1650 to the present, from areas such as Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America. Possible topics: imperialism and resistance, enlightenment, Romanticism, nationalism, modernism, postcolonialism, globalization, migration, evolving cultural and sexual identities. G.E. Integration IC.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: IC

ENGL 115WZ. Literature of the New Testament

(PHIL 133WZ same as ENGL 115WZ)

Units: 3

ENGL 117W. Writing from Children's Lit

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of G.E. Foundation and breadth area C. This course includes intensive, inquiry-based writing that emerges from the study of children's literature from grades K-6. Meets upper-division writing requirement. Enrollment limited to Liberal Studies Majors.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 131. Literacy Studies

Corequisite: ENGL 105. Examines current issues in the field of literacy studies pertaining to English education. Particular emphasis given to literacy acquisition, adolescent literacy, and the discourses of literary analysis and writing pedagogy. Required for English credential majors. (Formerly ENGL 175T)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 146. Medieval Literature

Corequisite: ENGL 105. Analysis of British texts, c. 500-1500. Topics may include oral and manuscript cultures; religious, linguistic and political conversion; and class, gender and sexuality in the literatures of monastery, court, and marketplace.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 147. English Renaissance Literature

Corequisite: ENGL 105. Analysis of texts, 1500-1660. Topics may include Renaissance humanism, Reformation, Counter-Refomration, New World exploration, conflicting political and social cultures of court and city, the rise of print, the advent of English theater, and the development of vernacular literary forms.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ENGL 150. Restoration and 18th Century Literature

Corequisite: ENGL 105. Analysis of British texts, 1660-1800. Topics may include commerce and mercantilism, colonialism, and global trade, crime and poverty, and an increased emphasis on feminine domesticity and masculine civic virtue.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall

ENGL 151. British Romantic Literature

Corequisite: ENGL 105. Analysis of texts from 1789-1832, period of the French and Industrial Revolutions. Topics will examine how expansions in the literary marketplace intersect with the growth of domestic ideology and the idea of 'natural' rights to form national identity.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ENGL 152. Victorian Literature

Corequisite: ENGL 105. Analysis of British texts, 1832-1901. Topics may include the condition of England, the spiritual crisis and science, empire and travel, cultural identity, and the "Woman Question".

Units: 4

ENGL 153. American Literature to 1865

Corequisite: ENGL 105. Analysis of texts, pre-contact to the Civil War. Topics may include American Indian creation stories and oral narratives, exploration, colonialism, Puritanism, frontier life, transcendentalism, and slavery.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ENGL 154. American Literature 1865 to World War I

Corequisite: ENGL 105. Analysis of texts from Reconstruction to 1918. Topics may include the women's rights movement, realism and naturalism, urbanization and industrialization, migration and immigration.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ENGL 155. Modern and Contemporary American Literature

Corequisite: ENGL 105. Analysis of texts since World War I. Topics may include alienation and disillusionment, self-conscious experimentation, the impact of the media and technology, social movements and identity politics, globalization, and postmodernism.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 156. Modern and Contemporary British Literature

Corequisite: ENGL 105. Discussion and written analyses of selected poems, plays, and fiction from 1900 to the present by such authors as Forster, Yeats, Woolf, Lawrence, Joyce, Greene, Auden, Thomas, and post-World War II writers.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 156Z. Modern and Contemporary British Literature

Discussion and written analyses of selected poems, plays, and fiction from 1900 to the present by such authors as Forster, Yeats, Woolf, Lawrence, Joyce, Greene, Auden, Thomas, and post-World War II writers.

Units: 4

ENGL 160W. Writing Workshop

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion (C or better) of the ENGL 5B or ENGL 10 graduation requirement. Practical assignments in writing, directed according to each student's individual needs. May be elected as preparation for special composition requirements. Does not apply to the English major or minor. Meets the upper-division writing skills requirement for graduation.

Units: 4, Repeatable up to 8 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 160WZ. Writing Workshop

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion (C or better) of the ENGL 5B or ENGL 10 graduation requirement. Practical assignments in writing, directed according to each student's individual needs. May be elected as preparation for special composition requirements. Does not apply to the English major or minor. Meets the upper-division writing skills requirement for graduation.

Units: 4

ENGL 161. Advanced Writing of Poetry

Prerequisite: ENGL 41. Intensive workshop in the writing of poetry; appropriate readings and analyses.

Units: 4, Repeatable up to 8 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 163. Advanced Writing of Fiction

Prerequisite: ENGL 43. Intensive workshop in the writing of fiction; appropriate readings and analyses.

Units: 4, Repeatable up to 8 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 164. Advanced Writing of Creative Nonfiction

Prerequisite: ENGL 44. Intensive workshop in memoir, lyric essay, and all other forms of creative nonfiction writing; appropriate readings and analyses.

Units: 4, Repeatable up to 8 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 164Z. Advanced Prose Writing

Prerequisite: ENGL 5B or ENGL 10. Workshop in all forms of nonfiction prose writing; appropriate readings and analyses. Designed for majors in all fields who want to develop their writing.

Units: 4, Repeatable up to 8 units

ENGL 167. Mythology and Folklore

Discussion and written analyses of the structure, content, and function of myth and folklore in world literature, with particular emphasis on the relationships among language, myth, and culture.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ENGL 168T. Women and Literature

(WS 168T same as ENGL 168T.) Prerequisite: ENGL 20. Discussion and written analysis of literature by and about women. Special emphasis on 19th and 20th Century authors including the Brontes, George Eliot, Emily Dickinson, Edith Wharton, Virginia Woolf, and contemporary writers.

Units: 4, Repeatable up to 8 units

ENGL 169T. Forms of Literature

Sections designated as emphasizing poetry, drama, novel, short story, perhaps limited to a specific period or subclass; for example, 18th Century English Novel, 20th Century British and American Poetry, Modern Short Stories, 20th Century Drama, Tragedy, Folklore, Mythology. Discussion and written analyses are required.

Units: 1-4, Repeatable up to 8 units
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ENGL 169T. Jewish American Writers

Through novels, short stories, and films, we will study the way being American has influenced Jewish writers and the ways that Jewish writers have affected notions of what it means to be American.

Units: 4

ENGL 171. Biography and Autobiography

Reading, discussion, and written analyses of selected biographical or autobiographical works, including such topics as literary biography, the autobiographical essay, memoirs, and issues of gender and ethnicity in biographical form.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall

ENGL 174. Popular Fiction

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area C. Survey of major types of popular genre fiction (detective, horror, spy, science fiction, Western, fantasy, etc.) Discussion; writing. Examination of works in cultural and historical context and as literary and commercial art. G.E. Integration IC.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: IC

ENGL 174Z. Popular Fiction - London in Literature

Units: 3
GE Area: IC

ENGL 175T. Lectures in Literature

Lectures in a selected topic in literature or related fields by the regular faculty and/or visiting lecturers.

Units: 1-4, Repeatable up to 8 units

ENGL 175T. Teaching Writing in Public Schools

The new common core curriculum standards for secondary schools will be in place by 2014. Teaching writing is central to the new standard's pedagogy, and this class addresses the role writing plays in not only your development as an English teacher, but in students' progress toward successful adult life.

Units: 4

ENGL 175T. Writing in the Digital Age

Designed especially for future teachers of writing, this ciurse introduces students to the variety of new genres (including blogs, wikis, etc) and modes of reception produced by the development of traditional print forms into online and e-formats.

Units: 4

ENGL 176T. Genre Film: Form and Function

(ENGL 176T same as WS 176T.) Discussion and close written analyses of selected topics, including such types as comedies, musicals, horror films, wester, etc.

Units: 1-4, Repeatable up to 8 units
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ENGL 176T. Film Noir

This class will examine the role(s) of women in film noir. In what ways are they defined by the male criminal ambience of the thriller? To what extent are they on the outer margins of this world, the victims of male crime, sometimes the objects of the hero?s protection, or as often points of masculine vulnerability?

Units: 4, Repeatable up to 8 units

ENGL 176T. Screening the Jewish Mama

From Freud to Albert Brooks, we will study the evolving stereotype of the Jewish Mother in 20th-21st century plays, films and television, seeking to assess whether she helps or hinders the work of integration and assimilation into America.

Units: 4, Repeatable up to 8 units

ENGL 177. Literature, Cinema and the Liberal Arts

Explores humanistic themes and motifs through comparative analysis of works of literature, drama, and contemporary cinema. Examines how film and the other arts shape and reflect American values. Two essay midterms. Final project/paper. Five thousand work writing requirement. (Formerly INTD 168)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall

ENGL 178. Lesbian & Gay Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL 105 or permission of the instructor. Discussion and written analysis of literature that explores lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and/or queer identities and experience. Also considers how cultural and historical forces shape current notions of sexual identity and community

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ENGL 179. Multi-Ethnic American Literature

Prerequisite: English 5B or ENGL 10. Discussion and written analysis of selected poems, plays, fiction, and memoir by authors from several American ethnic backgrounds, such as African American, American Indian, Latino/Hispanic American, Asian American. (Formerly ENGL 169T)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ENGL 181. Literary Theory and Criticism

A survey of literary theory, including Marxism, feminism, psychoanalysis, deconstruction, structuralism, and post-structuralism. Topics also include the history of literary criticism and the practice of interpretation. Discussion, lectures, written analyses.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 182. English Workshop

Seminar in composition and learning. Discussion and practical exercises concerning theory, evaluation, and improvement of language learning and composition. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 1-4, Repeatable up to 8 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 183T. Seminar in Literature

Prerequisite: appropriate upper-division literature course. Designed for students interested in in-depth study of a literary topic; recommended for liberal studies majors. Seminar in an aspect of literary history, type, period, movement, individual author. Reports and written analyses required.

Units: 1-4, Repeatable up to 8 units

ENGL 184. Chaucer

Reading, discussion, and written analyses of the major works of Geoffrey Chaucer.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall

ENGL 185. English Internship Seminar

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Seminar to be taken concurrently with ENGL 186 during the first semester of enrollment in program. Group and individual analyses of writing done in internship assignments. Discussion of the rhetorical problems of writing for public agencies, magazines and journals, and private industry. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 2
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 186. Internship in English

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. No more than 2 units of ENGL 186 may apply to the English major. See also ENGL 185. Supervised work experience in public agencies and private industry to provide an opportunity to develop professional writing skills. Approved for SP grading. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 2-6
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 187. Milton

Reading, discussion, and written analyses of the major works of John Milton.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ENGL 189. Shakespeare

(ENGL 189 same as DRAMA 194.) Reading and writing analysis of major works of Shakespeare.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 189Z. Shakespeare

Units: 4

ENGL 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- Independent Study. Approved for SP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

ENGL 191. Supervised Independent Reading

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Reading works from a literary period (for example, Beowulf to Marlowe, American Literature to Whitman, World Literature: Ancient and Medieval) and discussion in individual conferences. (Formerly ENGL 191T)

Units: 1-4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 192. Projects in English

Not applicable to English major. Individual projects in problems related to teaching English composition and literature; for example, tutoring minority students, investigating the effectiveness of programs in English composition and literature, devising new approaches to teaching English.

Units: 1-4, Repeatable up to 8 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 193T. Seminar in Literary Studies

No more than 12 units of ENGL 193T- ENGL194T may be applied to the English major. Sections designated by topic. Individual projects; reading, discussion, and writing of papers on individual writers (for example, Milton, D.H. Lawrence), short periods of literary history (for example, Romantic Poets, Modern Novel), literary themes and traditions (for example, Transcendental Vein in American Literature, Arthurian Tradition) literary criticism (for example, Problems in Modern Criticism, Archetype and Myth), and other special topics. ENGL 193T should ordinarily not be taken until 3 upper-division courses in English have been completed.

Units: 4, Repeatable up to 8 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ENGL 193T. Victorian Children's Literature

As nineteenth-century Britain evolved into the Victorian period, the child remained a significant focus of life and literature, but industrialism, colonialism, and skepticism produced a more complicated context in which to define the child or provide socialization through literature. This seminar will consider literature written for children during the Victorian period both to understand its literary value and to examine what that literature reveals about constructions of childhood for nineteenth-century Britain.

Units: 4, Repeatable up to 8 units

ENGL 193T. Teaching Graphic Novel

Introduction to using comics and graphic novels in the classroom (grades 4-college level). Capitalizing on multi-modal literacies expected in the world today, comics offer an effective form through which to explore and practice literacy. We read a range of comics and graphic novels from around the world to learn about comics form and content. Through creative activities, research, and writing we consider how, when, and why comics can be a useful, pleasurable addition to the classroom curriculum.

Units: 4, Repeatable up to 8 units

ENGL 193T. Tolkien and the Great Wars

The Lord of the Rings, among other things, is one of the great 20th century novels of industrial warfare. Like T. H. White?s, The Once and Future King, Tolkien uses a mythical past, but his concerns are firmly grounded in two world wars. In this class we will examine Tolkien?s works, primarily The Lord of the Rings, from many different perspectives, but primarily within the context of 20th century warfare and the questions it raised for European culture.

Units: 4, Repeatable up to 8 units

ENGL 193T. Manners and Manors

Readings and discussion of the literature of the English country house, from 17th century country house poetry, through select 18th, 19th, and 20th century novels and drama, and contemporary television mini-series (including Downton Abbey). The country estate or great house as a microcosm of British social networks, an expression of British national identity, and its rise and decline a marker for the trajectory of imperialism and cultural reinvention.

Units: 4, Repeatable up to 8 units

ENGL 193T. Cather Wharton

This course will focus on the novels of Willa Cather and Edith Wharton, two extraordinary writers from the late 19th/early 20th century. Much of their writing focuses on women's lives--the wealthy, the immigrant, the American abroad, the Westerner--illustrating the variety of ways that women responded to barriers and limitations.

Units: 4, Repeatable up to 8 units

ENGL 193T. Walt Whitman

Units: 4

ENGL 194T. Seminar in Women and Literature

(ENGL 194T same as WS 194T.) May be substituted for ENGL 193T in the English major; no more than 12 units of ENGL 193T- ENGL194T applicable to the major. Sections designated by topic. Individual projects; reading, discussion, and writing papers on individual women writers or some aspect of women in literature; for example, Doris Lessing, Myth and Archetypes of Women. ENGL 194T should ordinarily not be taken until 3 upper-division courses in English have been completed.

Units: 4, Repeatable up to 8 units

ENGL 194T. Adrienne Rich and Her Influence

This course will study Adrienne Rich's work as a poet, and as a literary/social activist and critic. We'll read all of her poetry and much of her prose, paying special attention to the big shifts in style, form, and voice during her career and look at ways in which her work might be seen as a whole piece in spite of (or because of) the changes. We'll explore her profound significance in the development of contemporary poetry-- especially in the advancement of women's voices in US poetry--and we'll explore Rich's influence in the work(s) of various contemporary poets.

Units: 4, Repeatable up to 8 units

ENGL 241. Seminar in Form and Theory: Poetry

Prerequisite: normally limited to students enrolled in the graduate creative writing program; others admitted by permission of instructor. Seminar in literary craft designed primarily for the graduate writing student to provide intensive study of current and traditional formal, stylistic, and technical issues and controversies in the genre (for example, traditional prosody, non-traditional poetics, and contemporary lyric).

Units: 4

ENGL 242. Literary Editing and Publishing

Prerequisite: normally limited to students enrolled in the graduate creative writing program; others admitted by permission of instructor. Seminar in evaluating literary manuscripts, including but not limited to poetry collections submitted for the annual Philip Levine Prize in Poetry. Issues of aesthetic, book manuscript development, literary contest administration, and poetry book production and marketing.

Units: 4

ENGL 243. Seminar in Form and Theory: Fiction

Prerequisite: normally limited to students enrolled in the graduate creative writing program; others admitted by permission of instructor. Seminar in literary craft designed primarily for the graduate writing student to provide intensive study of current and traditional formal, stylistic, and technical issues and controversies in the genre (for example, narrative theory and non-traditional fictional forms).

Units: 4

ENGL 245. Seminar in Form and Theory: Creative Nonfiction

Prerequisite: normally limited to students enrolled in graduate creative writing program; others by permission of instructor. Seminar in literary craft designed primarily for the graduate writing student to provide intensive study of current and traditional formal, stylistic and technical issues and controversies in the genre (for example, traditional and nontraditional essay forms, memoir, prose theory).

Units: 4

ENGL 250T. Textual Communities and Literary Kinship

This seminar explores the existence and nature of localized "canons" before The Canon. Reading closely texts from several specific "textual communities" from various times and places in Medieval Britain, it will explore concepts of affiliation and kinship lines linking readers and writers through practices of communal reception, translation, literary imitation, and formula creation.

Units: 4, Repeatable up to 8 units

ENGL 250T. Myth, Epic, Folktale & Biopoetics

The course explores biopoetics via a comparative study of three genres (myth, epic, folktale). Readings may include Celtic, Norse, Roman and Indian texts. We will critique archetypal theories, turning instead to recent developments in cognitive science and evolutionary psychology which suggest a new poetics grounded in the human body. Attention will be paid to the physicality of performance, narrative attention, contextual effects and artistry.

Units: 4, Repeatable up to 8 units

ENGL 250T. Experimental American Nonfiction

This course will explore the recent rise of innovative and experimental American writing, focusing on the defining forms and techniques of contemporary cross-genre literature. Discussion and lecture will focus on the development of alternative forms of narrative and consider writing craft, technique, and theory in specific new forms such as the collage, prose poem, short-short story, and the lyric essay.

Units: 4, Repeatable up to 8 units

ENGL 250T. Eliot/Frost/Stevens

The course will explore the works of three American Modernist poets, T.S. Eliot, Robert Frost, and Wallace Stevens. It will include close readings of poems, examination of the evolution of their work throughout their careers, discussion of what links them as Modernists as well as the differences in their approaches to poetry.

Units: 4, Repeatable up to 8 units

ENGL 261. Seminar: Writing Poetry

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Advanced individual projects in the writing of poetry.

Units: 4

ENGL 263. Seminar: Writing Fiction

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Advanced individual projects in the writing of fiction.

Units: 4

ENGL 265. Seminar: Writing Creative Nonfiction

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Advanced individual projects in the writing of creative nonfiction.

Units: 4

ENGL 270. Writing Workshop for Teachers

Prerequisites: major or minor in English; permission of instructor. Workshop emphasizing writing theory. Study of current writing theory and pedagogical techniques will be integrated with discussions of writing produced during the course.

Units: 4

ENGL 278T. Seminar in Composition Studies

Seminar exploring focused topics in composition studies, including but not limited to research methods in the field, literacy theory, rhethorical theory, stylistics, genre studies, writing assessment, teaching with technology, and the intersections of culture and writng.

Units: 4, Repeatable up to 8 units

ENGL 280T. Seminar in Critical Theory

Prerequisites: major or minor in English; permission of instructor. Seminar in literary criticism (for example, Literary Critics).

Units: 4

ENGL 280T. Graduate-level Literary Analysis

This course is designed to hone skills in literary analysis for graduate-level work. It will review research methods in literary studies and approaches to literary criticism. Students will summarize and critique genres of scholarly writing (review, abstract, prospectus, analytical essay), as well as producing an example of each, culminating in an analytical essay appropriate for a graduate seminar or conference presentation. These skills and methods will be applied to examples of various literary genres (e.g., epic, lyric poem, novel) from the U.S., Britain, and other parts of the world.

Units: 4

ENGL 281. Current Writing Theory

Prerequisites: major or minor in English; permission of instructor. Designed to acquaint the student with current key issues in composition theory and the theoretical implications for course design and pedagogy.

Units: 4

ENGL 282. Practicum in the Teaching of Writing

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Discussion of theoretical issues as they apply to the writing classroom. Normally taken concurrently with the composition option teaching requirement. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 1

ENGL 286S. Practicum in Literary Arts - Publishing nd Programming

Limited to students enrolled in the MFA program. Supervised work on editorial staff of professional literary magazine; projects in arts programming and service-learning. Repeatable for credit. Letter grade only.

Units: 1-6

ENGL 290. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

ENGL 291. Supervised Independent Reading

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Reading works from a literary period (for example, More to Milton, 20th Century American Literature, World Literature, Renaissance-Modern) and discussion in individual conferences. Approved for RP grading. (Formerly ENGL 291T)

Units: 1-4

ENGL 298. Project

Prerequisite: See Criteria for Thesis and Project. Revising, amending, and editing of three original scholarly papers produced while enrolled in graduate seminars, with the goal of creating publishable journal articles. The student's committee must approve of the scope and quality of the papers. Abstract required. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 2

ENGL 298C. Project Continuation

Pre-requisite: Project ENGL 298. For continuous enrollment while completing the project. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

ENGL 299. Thesis

Prerequisite: See Criteria for Thesis and Project. Preparation, completion, and submission of an acceptable thesis for the master's degree. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 2-6

ENGL 299C. Thesis Continuation

Pre-requisite: Thesis 298. For continuous enrollment while completing the thesis. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

ENGL 422T. Disoriented Word

Units: 3

ENGL 622T. Disoriented Word

Units: 3

ENGL 622T. Cultrs/Chldhd

Units: 3

ESE 1. Introduction to Academic Literacy

Meets the Early Start Requirement. Designed to prepare students for the university's first-year writing requirement by teaching students a variety of academic reading and writing strategies.

Units: 1

ESE 3. English Strategies

Exposure to a variety of texts. Quoting, paraphrasing, summarizing, and synthesizing ideas. Attention to vocabulary development and grammar/editing. Application of learning strategies and reflection on use of these strategies. Meets the university remediation requirement.

Units: 3

Requirements

English Minor

Students in many vocational fields often realize that special skill in writing may be of great use in their future work -- and such skill can best be obtained through an English minor. The English Minor requires 20 units above ENGL 5B or 10, at least 12 of which must be upper division, and 4 of these units must be from 189 or 193T/194T. ENGL 160W does not apply to the English Minor. Courses taken as CR/NC may not apply to the minor with the exception of 4 units total of 175T and 186.

ENGL 189, 193T, or 194T (4 units)
Other upper-division English courses (not including ENGL 160W) (8 units)
Other English courses (not including ENGL 5B or 10) (8 units)
Total (20 units)

Note: The English Minor also requires a 2.0 GPA and 6 upper-division units in residence.

 

Faculty

The English Department consists of 24 full-time faculty whose teaching fields cover every area of literary studies and the humanities, including film and folklore. Most of the faculty have published books, textbooks, and articles in their disciplines, five have received outstanding teaching awards at the university, and one has received an outstanding teaching award for the entire CSU system. In addition, the faculty includes a number of lecturers, part-time instructors and teaching assistants, and the department operates an English writing lab staffed by tutors trained to work with students on an individual basis.

Name Degree Email Phone
Adisasmito-Smith, Steven E Doctor of Philosophy sadisasmito@csufresno.edu 559.278.2714
Ayala, Daniel R Doctorate of Education daayala@csufresno.edu
Baer, Kristin A Master of Arts kristinbaer@mail.fresnostate.edu
Bernthal, Craig A Doctor of Philosophy craigb@csufresno.edu 559.278.4766
Beynon, John C Doctor of Philosophy jbeynon@csufresno.edu 559.278.2240
Borofka, David P Master of Fine Arts dborofka@mail.fresnostate.edu
Bushman, Johanna M Second Master of Arts jobushman@csufresno.edu
Church, Steven Master of Fine Arts stchurch@csufresno.edu 559.278.3919
Clifton, Michael E Doctor of Philosophy michaelc@csufresno.edu
Crisco, Virginia Doctor of Philosophy vcrisco@csufresno.edu 559.278.4918
Daher, Brandon Master of Arts bdaher@csufresno.edu 559.278.4141
Espinoza, Alex Master of Fine Arts aespinoza@csufresno.edu 559.278.5833
Firstman, Carole A Master of Fine Arts daisy1027@mail.fresnostate.edu
Garza Gonzalez, Ana R Master of Fine Arts anagarza@csufresno.edu
Gilewicz, Magdalena Doctor of Philosophy magdag@csufresno.edu 559.278.4926
Godfrey, Kathleen Doctor of Philosophy kgodfrey@csufresno.edu 559.278.4919
Hales, Corrinne Doctor of Philosophy connieh@csufresno.edu 559.278.2359
Hales, John R Doctor of Philosophy johnhal@csufresno.edu 559.278.3006
Hansen, Richard T Doctor of Philosophy rhansen@csufresno.edu 559.278.4916
Harding, Cecile R Master of Fine Arts charding@csufresno.edu
Hendrix, Howard Doctor of Philosophy howardh@csufresno.edu
Hendrix, Laurel L Doctor of Philosophy laurelh@csufresno.edu 559.278.2898
Henson, Christi L Doctor of Philosophy chrishe@csufresno.edu 559.278.2140
Hooper, Stefani D Master of Arts stefanihooper@mail.fresnostate.edu
Hughes, Courtney N Master of Fine Arts music68@mail.fresnostate.edu
Ibarra, Gabriel J Master of Arts gpoet@mail.fresnostate.edu
Jarrar, Randa Master of Fine Arts rjarrar@csufresno.edu 559.278.4928
Jenkins, Ruth Y Doctor of Philosophy ruthj@csufresno.edu 559.278.4922
Johnson, James L Doctor of Philosophy lynj@csufresno.edu 559.278.2701
Kachadoorian, Melanie W Master of Fine Arts mweger@csufresno.edu
Kolofer, Megan M Master of Arts mkolofer@mail.fresnostate.edu
Krongaus, Sheldon Master of Arts sheldonk@csufresno.edu
Mandaville, Alison Doctor of Philosophy amandaville@csufresno.edu
Maniquiz, Michael Master of Fine Arts mmaniquiz@csufresno.edu
Mayer, Jennifer M Master of Arts jennmayer06@mail.fresnostate.edu
Najmi, Samina Doctor of Philosophy snajmi@csufresno.edu 559.278.2660
Nichols, Tanya R Master of Fine Arts tanichols@csufresno.edu
Paul, Mary W Master of Arts mpaul@csufresno.edu
Powell, Elizabeth S Juris Doctor epowell@csufresno.edu
Russell, Wanda H Master of Fine Arts wandar@csufresno.edu
Santikian, Leslie A Master of Fine Arts lsantikian@mail.fresnostate.edu
Scadding, Tomaro M Master of Arts tscadding@mail.fresnostate.edu
Skeen, Timothy D Doctor of Philosophy tskeen@csufresno.edu 559.278.4924
Stone, Kirk D Master of Fine Arts kistone@csufresno.edu
Sutton, Lucille M Master of Fine Arts lsutton@csufresno.edu
Tricic, Lejla Master of Fine Arts ltricic@csufresno.edu
Wall, Clare-Marie Doctor of Philosophy clarew@csufresno.edu 559.278.2248
Walton, James E Doctor of Philosophy jamesw@csufresno.edu 559.278.4913
Wang, Bo Doctor of Philosophy bwang@csufresno.edu 559.278.4923
Watkins, Christine K Bachelor of Arts cwatkins@csufresno.edu
Webley, Margaret M Master of Fine Arts mwebley@csufresno.edu
Wein, Toni Doctor of Philosophy twein@csufresno.edu 559.278.2207
Weston, Lisa M Doctor of Philosophy lisaw@csufresno.edu 559.278.4927
Williams, Jacqueline E Master of Fine Arts jacquelinew@csufresno.edu
Yang, Andre Master of Fine Arts dreyang@mail.fresnostate.edu