Economics, Minor

Department

Department of Economics

Antonio Avalos, Chair
Peters Business Building, Room 385
559.278.3916
www.fresnostate.edu/economics/

Degrees and Programs Offered

BA in Economics, B.A.
MN in Economics, Minor
MN in International Political Economy Minor

Economics is the social science that studies the way in which societies are organized to produce the goods and services that sustain and enhance the life processes of the community. As a fundamental scientific discipline, economics employs systematic analysis in the study of the production and distribution of income within and among nations. Since all social policy issues in modern societies have an economic dimension, the study of economics offers the student an opportunity to investigate the most important and exciting problems of political economy facing the world today.

Such topics as inflation, unemployment, business cycles, international trade and finance, and development have long been within the province of economics. More recently, the economic way of thinking has been extended to other areas. Economic theories have been used to explain crime rates, birth rates, class conflict, pollution, marriage decisions, migration, and many other topics involving human behavior.

Economics majors acquire skills in critical and analytical thinking that contribute to an individual's intellectual independence and self-confidence in the problem-solving processes. In addition, economics majors confront the necessity of developing a broad view of the options facing humankind in organizing the production and distribution of income. The literature of economics presents widely diverse systems of political economic philosophy. The department offers a well-developed and balanced curriculum.

The program in economics is designed to give the student maximum flexibility. A typical economics major might take courses in intermediate macroeconomic theory and statistics while also learning about global corporations in the third world, or the regional economy, or pursue an independent study project on the foundations of supply-side economics. The economics major is designed to permit the student to pursue a broad liberal arts undergraduate degree, integrating the study of economics with other social sciences, humanities, natural sciences, and business administration.

Center for Economic Research and Education of Central California

The Center for Economic Research and Education of Central California enhances economic development and economic literacy in the San Joaquin Valley by using the expertise of our faculty and the skills of our students. The center sponsors research on regional issues such as unemployment, health care, and pollution. It also provides economic education services such as teacher workshops and curriculum consultation.

Courses

Economics

ECON 25. Introduction to Economics

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. Survey of the development of economic ideas and theories in the context of economic history. Analysis of major economic thinkers. Introduction to contemporary economic issues and policy controversies. Does not count toward the major in economics. G.E. Breadth D3.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: D3

ECON 40. Principles of Microeconomics

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. Introduction to microeconomic theories of demand, production, and income distribution; price determination and resource allocation, under alternative forms of market organization; government regulation of economic activity; applied economic analysis and policy formation in selected topic areas. G.E. Breadth D3. (CAN ECON 4)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: D3

ECON 50. Principles of Macroeconomics

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. Economic theories of the determination of income, output, employment, and prices in the economy as a whole; business cycles, fiscal and monetary policies; economic growth and development; international trade; and comparative economic systems. G.E. Breadth D3. (CAN ECON 2)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: D3

ECON 100A. Intermediate Microeconomics

Prerequisites: ECON 40, ECON 50. Price mechanism and resource allocation under conditions of pure competition, monopolistic competition, oligopoly; theories of consumer's choice, cost, production, income distribution; nature of economic generalizations.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ECON 100B. Intermediate Macroeconomics

Prerequisites: ECON 40, ECON 50. An examination of classical, Keynesian and post- Keynesian theories of the determination of the levels of income, output, and employment; the scientific and ideological implications of Keynesian thought; and the theoretical foundations of contemporary monetary and fiscal policies.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

ECON 101. History of Economic Thought

Prerequisites: ECON 40 and ECON 50, or ECON 165 passed with C grade or better. Evolution of economics as a science; doctrines of different schools of thought -- Mercantilists, Physiocrats, Historical School, Classical Economists; contributions of outstanding economists.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

ECON 102W. Explorations in Economic Literature

Prerequisites: ECON 40, ECON 50; satisfactory completion (C or better) of the ENGL 5B or ENGL 10 graduation requirement; upper-division standing. An investigation into important economic ideas and issues through selected readings of either contemporary literature or classics in the history of economic thought or both. The class is conducted as a seminar with emphasis on student contributions. Meets the upper-division writing skills requirement for graduation.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ECON 103. Economics of Inflation, Unemployment, and Growth

Prerequisite: ECON 40 and ECON 50 passed with C grade or better. Theoretical and empirical examination of the business cycle, including major economic variables such as Gross Domestic Product (GDP), inflation, unemployment, as well as other relevant economic indicators in the United States economy. The course emphasizes business cycle theories, economic indicators, and macroeconomic policies.

Units: 3

ECON 110. Economic History of the United States

Prerequisites: ECON 40 and ECON 50, or ECON 165 passed with C grade or better. Exploration and colonization to the present; economic factors in develop ment of the United States; relationships of economic forces to historical, political, and social change.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ECON 111. European Economic History

Prerequisites: ECON 40 and ECON 50, or ECON 165 passed with C grade or better. An examination of the causes and consequences of economic development in Europe from 1650 to 1950. Survey of selected economic forces that shaped key social institutions.

Units: 3

ECON 114. Economic Development of Poor Nations

Prerequisites: ECON 40 and ECON 50 passed with C grade or better. Intensive study of the causes and consequences of underdevelopment which affect two-thirds of the world's people. Topics include theories of development, historical roots of underdevelopment, evaluation of aid programs, New International Economic Order, Asian export economies, managing external debt.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ECON 115T. Topics in U.S. Economic History

Requisites: ECON 40 and ECON 50 passed with C grade or better. Detailed investigation of developments in the United States economy. Topics vary with the needs and interests of students and faculty.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

ECON 117. Environmental Economics

Prerequisites: ECON 40 and ECON 50 passed with C grade or better. Investigation into the economics of resource use. Development and creation of resources through the application of technology and the destruction of resources through misuse and pollution of the environment.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall - even

ECON 119. Urban & Regional Economics

Prerequisites: ECON 40 and ECON 50 passed with C grade or better. Examination of the San Joaquin Valley from a policy-oriented perspective. Construction of economic models and theories regarding how urban and regional economic activity is located across spaces. Investigation of why cities form and why they locate where they do. Application of regional economic models to the local economy.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

ECON 120. Women in the Economy

Prerequisite: ECON 40 and ECON 50, or ECON 165 passed with C grade or better. An exploration of the social and economic forces shaping the economic status of women in the U.S. Topics include women's participation in paid employment and current labor market and family policy issues.

Units: 3

ECON 123. Introduction to Econometrics

Prerequisites: ECON 40, ECON 50 and MATH 11 or MATH 101 or DS 73 or AGBS 71 or PSYCH 42 passed with C grade or better. Statistical data analysis in economics. Use of multiple regression analysis, time series analysis, index numbers. Basic theory; computer applications using major economic data sources; interpretation of results. (2 lecture, 2 lab )

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ECON 125. Introduction to Mathematical Methods for Economics

Prerequisites: ECON 40, ECON 50; MATH 75. Introduction to mathematical methods useful for economic analysis. Mathematical concepts are developed in the context of economic examples and applications. Knowledge of fundamental economic concepts is required. Strongly recommended for students considering graduate school in economics or business.

Units: 3

ECON 131. Public Economics

Prerequisite: ECON 40 and ECON 50 passed with C grade or better. Impact of government expenditures and taxes on the allocation of resources and the distribution of income. Evaluation of government expenditure programs and tax policies. Analysis of existing government policies and proposed reforms.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall - even

ECON 135. Money and Banking

Prerequisites: ECON 40, ECON 50. Survey of the monetary and banking system of the United States and analysis of its role in economic growth and stabilization.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ECON 140. The Political Economy of the Military-Industrial Complex

Prerequisite: ECON 50. Economic effects of military expenditures in historical perspective. Economic effects of World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. The Military-Industrial Complex, war profiteering, and the economic effects of disarmament.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ECON 144. Economics of Sports

Prerequisites: ECON 40 or ECON 50 or ECON 165. Issues surrounding the monopolistic nature of professional leagues, tax incentives used to attract/maintain a professional franchise, and collective bargaining agreements will be analyzed through Industrial-Organization, Public Finance, and Labor Economics respectively.

Units: 3

ECON 146. Economics of Crime

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Aread D. Economic theory of choice and rationality applied to analysis of crime, focusing on white-collar and corporate crime. Examines costs and benefits of crime control policies. Economics of participation in crime, law enforcement, prosecution, and punishment. G.E. Integration ID.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall
GE Area: ID

ECON 150. Labor Economics

Prerequisites: ECON 40 and ECON 50 passed with C grade or better. Alternative theories of wages, employment, and structure of labor market; impact of collective bargaining on level of wages, employment, and labor's share of national income; history and philosophies of labor movement; structure and functioning of labor unions.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall - even

ECON 152. Economics of Human Resources

Prerequisites: ECON 40 and ECON 50 passed with C grade or better. Economic theory of investment in education and job training; economic theories of discrimination; analysis of earnings differentials for women and ethnic minorities. Issues discussed include educational choices, affirmative action, comparable worth, and human resource planning policies.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring - odd

ECON 162. Health Economics

Prerequisite: ECON 40 and ECON 50 passed with C grade. Economic issues associated with the provision of health care in the U.S. Role of competitive market forces, non-profits, and government. Separate consideration of physicians, hospitals, insurance, and drug companies. Comparison to other countries.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring - even

ECON 165. The Modern American Economy

No prerequisites. Not open to economics majors. Provides an overview of the major economic forces that shape our everyday experiences by introducing fundamental economic principles and applying them to the American economy. Audio-visual materials and computer simulations are presented.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ECON 167. Contemporary Socioeconomic Challenges

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. In-depth analysis and discussion of major socio-economic challenges currently facing the U.S. Emphasis on understanding basic economic underpinnings of contemporary policy issues. Analysis of conflicting economic, social, political, and historical forces which condition and constrain policy implementation. G.E. Integration ID.

Units: 3
GE Area: ID

ECON 176. Economics Themes in Film

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Emphasizes economic concepts, issues, and institutions through an integrated series of classic films, lectures, and discussions. Students will apply the economic way of thinking to social problems involving such topics as economic growth, unemployment, income distribution, discrimination, and the global economy. G.E. Integration ID. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall
GE Area: ID

ECON 178. International Economics

Prerequisites: ECON 40, ECON 50. International economic relations; problems and policies in the light of fundamental economic theory.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

ECON 179. International Political Economy

Analysis of greater internationalization of national economies. Policies of states and transnational corporations in the context of globalization. Trade, finance, and production in the international context. Regional economic integration. Global assembly and labor issues. Evolution of multilateral institutions. (3 lecture/recitation hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring - even

ECON 181. Political Economy of Latin America

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Latin America's principal economic problems examined within a historical and contemporary context. Topics may include Colonialism, Neo-Colonialism, foreign corporations, debt crises, problems of industrialization, women and labor, agricultural backwardness, and free trade agreements. Intensive examination of major nations (particularly Mexico) and of dominant theoretical interpretations. Theories of development (structuralism, dependency, dualism, modernization) are integrated into case studies. G.E. Multicultural/International MI.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring - even
GE Area: M/I

ECON 183. Political Economy of the Middle East

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. A survey of historical, social, cultural, political, and economic development, economic development in the Middle East. An examination of Western colonial policies, the creation of modern states and their political and economic policies, the role of religion, and cultural heritage. G.E. Integration ID.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring
GE Area: ID

ECON 185. Directed Readings

Prerequisites: ECON 40, ECON 50, and permission of instructor. Directed readings in the literature of economics. Intensive reading of economic literature on special topics under faculty supervision.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ECON 188T. Special Topics

Prerequisites: ECON 40, ECON 50. Consideration of in-depth, special topics in political economy; systematic, detailed study into issues not possible in survey courses. Topics vary with the needs and interest of students and faculty.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

ECON 189T. Topics in Public Policy

Prerequisites: ECON 40, ECON 50. Detailed analysis of questions of economic policy. Areas of investigation include social welfare policy, farm policy, environmental quality policy, and others. Topics to be varied with the interests and needs of students and faculty.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

ECON 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- Independent Study. Approved for SP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ECON 191. Internship in Applied Economics

Prerequisite: senior standing, economics major. Supervised experience in either the private or public sector to provide students an opportunity to professionally apply economic theory and analysis. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 1-3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ECON 192. Senior Project

Prerequisite: ECON 40, ECON 50 passed with C grade or better, senior status as economics major. Course consists of a field trip, lectures and research. Designed to give students concrete experience on how economics is applied and how economists think, do research and present the results of their investigations.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Requirements

Economics Minor Requirements

ECON 40, 50 (6 units)
Select one: ECON 100A, 100B, 101 (3 units)
Economics electives (9 units)
Total (18 units)

Note: The minors also require a 2.0 GPA and 6 upper-division units in residence.

Advising Note for Minors

ECON 25, 40, and 50 may also meet General Education requirements. ECON 165 cannot be used as an elective for any minor in the Economics Program.

Faculty

The faculty of the department is staffed by professors whose primary professional commitment is to undergraduate education. Every member participates in the full range of teaching assignments from moderate sized sections of economics principles to small, upper-division classes (averaging 16 students). They offer a wide variety of courses ranging from the traditional core of intermediate micro and macroeconomic theory to problem-oriented courses, as the economics of health, crime, sports, and government regulation. The background of the faculty, like its program offerings, represents a broad spectrum of intellectual tastes and professional specialties.

Name Degree Email Phone
Arisian, Arakel A Master of Science arakela@csufresno.edu 559.278.4067
Avalos-Huerta, Antonio Doctor of Philosophy aavalos@csufresno.edu 559.278.8793
Brueggemann, Jeff A Master of Business Admin jbrueggemann@csufresno.edu
Dansby, Leroy Master of Arts leroyd@csufresno.edu 559.278.4856
Dunn, Lewis C Master of Arts ldunn@csufresno.edu 559.278.4934
Fabian, Thea P Master of Arts tfabian@csufresno.edu 559.278.4933
Fan, Qin Doctor of Philosophy qfan@csufresno.edu
Fayazmanesh, Sasan Doctor of Philosophy sasanf@csufresno.edu 559.278.2672
Heimerdinger, Kristin M Master of Arts kristinh@csufresno.edu 559.278.4045
Jauregui Andrews, Rosa M Master of Business Admin rosaj@csufresno.edu
Johansson, Lars F ljohansson@csufresno.edu 559.278.4045
Kempe, Leland R Master of Science lkempe@csufresno.edu 559.278.8832
Kim, Gil Doctor of Philosophy gikim@csufresno.edu 559.278.3950
Leet, Don R Doctor of Philosophy donle@mail.fresnostate.edu
Peterson, Janice L Doctor of Philosophy japeterson@csufresno.edu 559.278.2673
Van Vleck, Va Nee L Doctor of Philosophy vanvleck@csufresno.edu 559.278.4932
Vera, David R Doctor of Philosophy dvera@csufresno.edu 559.278.4935
de Freitas, Diane Master of Arts ddefreitas@csufresno.edu