Criminology, Minor

Department

Department of Criminology

Bernadette T. Muscat, Chair
Science II Building, Room 159
559.278.2305
FAX: 559.278.7265
www.fresnostate.edu/criminology

Degrees and Programs Offered

BS in Criminology - Victimology Option, B.S.
BS in Criminology - Corrections Option, B.S.
BS in Criminology - Law Enforcement Option, B.S. - Continuing & Global Education
BS in Criminology - Law Enforcement Option, B.S.
BS in Criminology - Forensic Behavioral Sciences, B.S.
CERT in Homeland Security, Certificate of Adv Study - Continuing & Global Education
MN in Criminology, Minor
MS in Criminology, M.S. - Continuing & Global Education
MS in Criminology, M.S.

The Department of Criminology provides undergraduate and graduate education in criminology for students planning professional careers in the criminal justice field. The program is diversified and integrated, reflecting the wide range of job opportunities in the field, including direct service and administration in law enforcement, corrections, victimology/victim services, juvenile justice, and forensic behavioral sciences. The department offers the Bachelor of Science, Master of Science, and a minor. The department will not accept a student with a GPA less than 2.0 as an undergraduate major.

Undergraduate Program

Criminology courses at the undergraduate level include integration of theoretical and applied materials of an interdisciplinary nature. The undergraduate curriculum is designed to prepare students for beginning professional work in criminal justice and to provide preparation for graduate work.

The corrections option is designed for students interested in careers in probation, parole, correctional institutions, and other affiliated forms of work. The law enforcement option is designed for students interested in careers with federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies, or law enforcement careers within the private sector. The victimology option is designed for students interested in careers in domestic violence programs, rape counseling programs, victim/witness programs, or other victim-related programs at the local, state, or federal level; these programs can either be criminal justice based or community based. The Forensic Behavioral Sciences option prepares students interested in traditional criminal justice careers. However, it is also designed for students who are interested in the application of other behavioral sciences - such as psychology, anthropology, and linguistics - to the criminal justice system. An internship course is required in corrections, law enforcement, and victimology options.

Graduate Program

The Master of Science degree in Criminology is a 30-unit, flexible program which provides a solid core in the field of criminology while permitting students to pursue specialized areas of interest. The master's program is designed to prepare students for service and responsible administrative and professional positions in agencies in the criminal justice system. The master's program also prepares students for a wide variety of occupations including in-service education; administrative education and management; community college teaching; predoctoral studies; and research.

Off-Campus Degree Program

The department offers its B.S. via compressed video at the university satellite campuses located at College of the Sequoias in Visalia, California and West Hills College in Lemoore, California. This degree is also offered at law enforcement facilities in the city of Fresno.

Joint Center on Violence and Victim Studies

The Joint Center on Violence and Victim Studies (JCVVS), an inter-university consortium of California State University, Fresno, Washburn University, and the University of New Haven, addresses issues of violence and victimization. The Center offers professional development, consultation, education, training, and research and analysis to students and working professionals locally and nationally.

Courses

Criminology

CRIM 1. Strategies for Success in Criminology

Not open to non-crim majors; first semester major requirement. Program structure; faculty overview; degree requirements; support services; advising; grading; conduct and behavior; areas of academic knowledge and integration with emphasis upon critical thinking, decision-making and communication skills. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 2. Administration of Justice

Purpose, function, and history of agencies dealing with administration of justice; survey of criminal procedures; organization of law enforcement agencies at federal, state, and local levels; organization and functions of courts; probation, parole, and pardons; penology and prison administration; purpose and function of victim services.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 10. Crime, Criminology, and Justice

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. An introduction to the concept of crime, emphasizing its contextual foundations as the product of evolving criminal laws and the institutions that shape them. A survey of the methodological approaches used to measure and study crime. Patterns of crime and victimization in relation to their impact on society's response in its quest for justice. G.E. Breadth D3.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: D3

CRIM 20. Criminal Law

Highly recommend CRIM 1. Introduction to the case method of studying criminal law, theory, concept, and philosophy of substantive law and criminal offenses; analysis of court decisions and opinions through case method.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 50. Statistical and Computer Applications in Criminal Justice

Statistical and computer applications as they relate to criminological research and policy. Emphasis on descriptive and inferential statistical methods for the analysis of data and the application of appropriate computer statistical packages and other specialized computer programs for criminal justice.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 100. Criminology

Sociological, biological, psychological theories of crime causation; crime measurement; schools of criminology; crime typologies. Graduating criminology seniors have first priority; other students may receive priority status by permission of instructor.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 100H. Honors Criminology

Prerequisite: Open only to students who are qualified members of the Criminology Honors Program. An advanced exploration of the etiology of crime. An emphasis on primary literature with analysis and criticism of both classic and modern criminological theories.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CRIM 101. Crime and Violence in America

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Introduces students to types of crime and violence in America within a sociological, cultural, economic, and political context. Emphasis on methodological approaches to crime measurement. Looks at how crime and violence impacts individuals and their environment. G.E. Integration ID.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: ID

CRIM 102. Criminal Justice Organization and Management

Prerequisites: CRIM 2, CRIM 20. Highly recommended: CRIM 100 and CRIM 170. Fundamentals of organization/management theory, principles, and processes relating to the operation and functioning of the criminal justice system, including victim services agencies.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 102H. Honors Criminal Justice Organization and Management

Prerequisite: Open only to members of the Criminology Honors Program. A comprehensive examination of the structure and process of the American Criminal Justice System from an organizational management perspective. Conceptual thinking is essential in this exploration of current and future organizational challenges.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CRIM 108. Directed Policing

Open only to criminology majors. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and sponsoring agency. Supervised field experience in police work for interpreting theories developed in parallel criminology courses. Purchase of uniform required. Approved for SP grading. CR/NC grading only. (Minimum of 6 field hours per unit.)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 109. Comparative Systems of Criminal Justice

Prerequisites: CRIM 2. Highly recommended: CRIM 20, CRIM 100, and CRIM 170. Study of selected criminal justice systems in other jurisdictions; examination of the organization; administration and operations of criminal justice agencies in the United States, Europe, the United Kingdom, and Asia.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 110. Police in America

A basic survey course on the functions, roles, personnel systems, and management issues in law enforcement. Issues faced by municipal, county, state, and federal law enforcement are explored in detail. Analysis of contemporary programs and trends in policing. Community policing is explored. Studies issues of less-than-lethal technology and computerized information systems. Formerly CRIM 160T.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 112. Professionalism in Criminal Justice

Prerequisites: CRIM 2, CRIM 20. Highly recommended: CRIM 100 and CRIM 170. Professionalism in criminal justice including formal and informal control; political activity; use of discretion; conflict of interest; rights of clients; ethical, gender, and ethnic issues; and other current topics.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 113. Forensic Science

Prerequisite: CRIM 2. Open only to criminology majors. Advanced study of scientific crime investigation, identification, and detection methods.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 114. Ethics in Forensic Behavioral Sciences

Prerequisite: CRIM 2. Explores ethical aspects of the conduct of forensic behavioral scientists in the civil and criminal justice systems. Designed to provide the student with an informed basis for critically evaluating the behavior of behavioral scientists relative to legal proceedings.

Units: 3

CRIM 117. Criminal Legal Process

Prerequisite: CRIM 20. Specific emphasis on the laws of arrest, search and seizure, interrogation and confession, procedure prior to and during trial, postconviction procedures, limitations on criminal prosecutions and juvenile proceedings.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 118. Courts and Legal Procedure

Prerequisites: CRIM 20. Structure and function of trial and appellate courts. Procedural requirements of the judicial process. Rules of evidence as they apply to admissibility of behavioral and forensic evidence.

Units: 3

CRIM 119. Legal Aspects of Corrections

Prerequisite: CRIM 20. Legal issues affecting corrections; constitutional issues involving rights of the convicted and civil liability of staff. Origin, development, and classification of criminal law in corrections. Rules of evidence, search and seizure, etc.

Units: 3

CRIM 120. Juvenile Delinquency

The problem of juvenile delinquency; portrait of delinquency; causal factors; agencies of justice; treatment process; programs for control and prevention. G.E.. Integration ID.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: ID

CRIM 126. Women and Violence: Public Policy and the Law

(CRIM 126 same as WS 126.) Historical and contemporary issues in public policy responses to violence against women. Gender bias in the legal system and policing violence against women. Theory and research on problems in government policy and enforcement of the law.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 127. Evidence

Advanced problems in arrest, search, seizure, interrogation, and prosecution. The law of evidence, including problems of relevancy, hearsay, opinion, privilege, and scientific evidence. Juvenile law and procedure from detention to disposition.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 131. Correctional Institution Visitations

The opportunity to visit, examine, and investigate various correctional institutions within the state of California. Visitations will be mandatory. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 1-3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 133. Institution Corrections

Prerequisites: CRIM 2 and CRIM 20. Prison and issues of corrections in terms of historical development and current applications; various perspectives and definitions of social control; philosophical underpinnings of the system; prisoner and societal implications of social control.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 134. Criminal Justice Counseling

An overview of counseling modalities and counseling techniques in criminal justice settings.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 135. Community-Based Corrections

Prerequisites: CRIM 2 and CRIM 20. History and contemporary applications of community-based corrections. Juvenile and adult supervision at all three levels: local, state, and federal; probation, parole, electronic monitoring, residential treatment, drug/mental health courts, boot camps, intensive supervision.

Units: 3

CRIM 136T. Topics in Criminology

Analysis of selected areas of criminology; deviant behavior; institutional and non-institutional treatment; corrections; administration and management; law enforcement; criminalistics.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 12 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 136T. Trial Tactics and Courtroom Procedures

Students will learn civil and criminal trial tactics and courtroom procedures and will learn how to be effective trial lawyers and witnesses. The class involves attendance at lectures where the federal rules of Evidence and trial objections are taught. Further, all class members will participate as the intercollegiate CSU, Fresno mock trial team. The team members serve as both plaintiff and defense trial attorneys and witnesses. The team practices during class and on Saturday mornings, plus the members compete in weekend scrimmages and tournaments. It is anticipated that students will participate in both Fall and Spring semesters to be able to complete all scrimmages and tournaments.

Units: 3

CRIM 136T. Trial Tactics and Courtroom Procedures

Students will learn civil and criminal trial tactics and courtroom procedures and will learn how to be effective trial lawyers and witnesses. The class involves attendance at lectures where the federal rules of Evidence and trial objections are taught. Further, all class members will participate as the intercollegiate CSU, Fresno mock trial team. The team members serve as both plaintiff and defense trial attorneys and witnesses. The team practices during class and on Saturday mornings, plus the members compete in weekend scrimmages and tournaments. It is anticipated that students will participate in both Fall and Spring semesters to be able to complete all scrimmages and tournaments.

Units: 3

CRIM 137. Women, Girls & the Criminal Justice System

Prerequisite: CRIM 2. Analysis of women and girls in the criminal justice system; understanding of the role of gender in terms of female pathways to crime, nature of female offending, victimization, and incarceration. Gender-responsive criminal justice policy and practice.

Units: 3

CRIM 139. Criminal Justice Counseling Skills Practicum

Highly recommend CRIM 134 or permission of instructor. An experiential course designed to teach students essential skills in structuring counseling sessions with offenders. Emphasis on listening, validation, empathy, interviewing, probing, concreteness, self-disclosure, summarizing, confrontation, goal-setting, taking action, closure, and resistance.

Units: 3

CRIM 140. Family Violence

Typology and history of family abuse, including: legal guidelines; treatment approaches; emotional abuse; sexual abuse; spousal abuse; elderly abuse; and child abuse as a criminogenic factor.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 141. Alcohol, Drugs, and Criminality

Analysis of the composition, manufacture, use, and misuse of drugs (including alcohol); their relationship to criminality, and current responses by governmental and private organizations. Exposure to treatment programs may be required.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 150. Victim Services Program Management

This course examines the management techniques and skills needed to operate non-profit/government based victim services organizations. The course explores the various technologies that ensure victims' rights and efficient/effective service provision. Finally, advocacy regarding organizations, coalitions, and policies will be discussed.

Units: 3

CRIM 152. Elder Abuse

This course provides students with an overview of the history, theories, concepts, and practices of elder abuse. The course will also cover measurement, prevention, intervention, victim non-reporting practices, victims' rights, laws, and policies, victim recovery, and restorative justice practices.

Units: 3

CRIM 153. Psychology of Crime

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Explores the psychological bases of criminal behavior as they relate to the biology of criminality, as well as to the numerous and varied contributions from cultural economic, and geographic aspects of the social environment. G.E. Integration ID.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: ID

CRIM 154. Forensic Behavioral Science

Prerequisite: CRIM 2. Examines applications of behavioral sciences to the study and investigation of behavior and their implications for civil and criminal judicial proceedings. Evaluation of issues related to behavioral sciences as they pertain to civil liability and criminal responsibility.

Units: 3

CRIM 155. Biology of Criminality

This course examines criminal behavior in terms of psychophysiological factors, neurobiological and neuropsychological factors, and genetic factors. To understand the biology that underlies criminal behavioral responses to specific environmental factors.

Units: 3

CRIM 160H. Honors Seminar in Criminology

Prerequisite: Open only to students who are qualified members of the Criminology Honors Program. Honors seminar in specialized areas, new development and synthesis of criminological processes, thought and theory.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

CRIM 160T. Topics in Crimes

Intensive focus on particular crime categories, e.g., political, corruption, terrorism; corporate, computer, white collar, fraud, embezzlement; homicide, assassination, mass murder, sex crimes, violence, assault, rape, mayhem; property, burglary, robbery, piracy, professional pickpocketing, swindling, safe-cracking; organized; arson; and environmental.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 12 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 160T. Global Crime

Global Crime and Terrorism explores the phenomena of international organized crime and of global terrorism. The class will examine the organizations, the motives, and the connections among these groups.

Units: 3

CRIM 170. Research Methods in Criminal Justice

Highly recommended: PH 92, PSYCH 42, MATH 11, SOC 125, DS 73. Research methodology; use of library resources; electronic resources; preparation and handling of materials in criminology; written report required.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 170H. Honors Research Methods

Prerequisite: Open only to members of the Criminology Honors Program. The goal of this introduction to social science research is to develop a literature review and research design. This involves an intense library search, development of a literature review and implementation of a research project.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CRIM 173. Trauma & Crisis Intervention

Prerequisites: CRIM 175 & CRIM 176. Physiological and pyschological aspects of trauma; analysis of Stress Theory, Crisis Theory, and PTSD; short term and long term trauma; advocate intervention techniques and referral sources.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

CRIM 174. Ethnic and Gender Issues in Criminal Justice

The impact of ethnicity, gender and race on criminal justice personnel, offenders, and victims. Special problems experienced by various groups in obtaining services within the criminal justice system.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 175. Victimology

Major theoretical issues and debates in victimology. Victim blaming and defending, research and victim statistics, legal and policy dilemmas, bureaucratic responses to victims, and evaluation of victim compensation and restitution.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 176. Victim Services

Survey of community services for victims. Focus on victim services as a new subsystem. Theoretical, social, and legal issues that affect delivery of victim services.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 177. Legal Policy in Victim Services

Analysis of legislation and specific legal policies regarding victim services. Victim rights, the process of changing attitudes, and current laws will be a major focus.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 180. Internship in Law Enforcement

Open only to criminology majors. Prerequisites (may be taken concurrently): CRIM 2, CRIM 20, CRIM 102 and CRIM 112. Mandatory student attendance at a "pre-orientation" meeting within one year prior to enrolling in a department internship section. CR/NC grading only. (Minimum of 3 field hours per unit.)

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 12 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 180H. Honors Internship in Law Enforcement

Prerequisite: Open only to members of the Criminology Honors Program with senior standing. Mandatory student attendance at a "pre-orientation" meeting within one year prior to enrolling in a department internship section. The purpose is to relate the student's classroom studies with occupational and professional experiences. Students will be referred to related agencies where they will engage in activities requiring significant responsibility. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 181. Internship in Corrections

Open only to criminology majors. Prerequisites (may be taken concurrently): CRIM 2, CRIM 20, CRIM 102, CRIM 112, and CRIM 130. Mandatory student attendance at a "pre-orientation" meeting within one year prior to enrolling in a department internship section.CR/NC grading only. (Minimum of 3 field hours per unit.)

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 12 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 181H. Honors Internship in Corrections

Prerequisite: Open only to members of the Criminology Honors Program with senior standing. Mandatory student attendance at a "pre-orientation" meeting within one year prior to enrolling in a department internship section. The purpose is to relate the student's classroom studies with occupational and professional experiences. Students will be referred to related agencies where they will engage in activities requiring significant responsibility. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 182. Internship in Victimology

Open only to criminology majors. Prerequisites (may be taken concurrently): CRIM 2, CRIM 20, CRIM 102, CRIM 112, and CRIM 175. Mandatory student attendance at a "pre-orientation" meeting within one year prior to enrolling in a department internship section. CR/NC grading only. (Minimum of 3 field hours per unit.)

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 12 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 182H. Honors Internship in Victimology

Prerequisite: Open only to members of the Criminology Honors Program with senior standing. Mandatory student attendance at a "pre-orientation" meeting within one year prior to enrolling in a department internship section. The purpose is to relate the student's classroom studies with occupational and professional experiences. Students will be referred to related agencies where they will engage in activities requiring significant responsibility. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 192. Readings in Criminology

Prerequisite: upper-division standing and permission of the instructor. Supervised readings in a selected field relating to criminology.

Units: 1-3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CRIM 200. Research Methods in Criminology

Prerequisite: CRIM 170. Methods and techniques of research in criminology; research designs and models; preparation and critique of a research paper.

Units: 3

CRIM 201. Advanced Criminological Theory

Prerequisite: CRIM 100. An historical approach to a criminological theory. Special treatment of the theoretical underpinnings of contemporary thought. Detailed analysis of major 18th, 19th, 20th century thought.

Units: 3

CRIM 202. Law and the Criminal Justice System

Prerequisite: CRIM 117. The nature and philosophy of law; the common law tradition and our judicial system; the role of legislation and rules of statutory interpretation; Constitutional Law concepts and their applications in the Criminal Justice System.

Units: 3

CRIM 203. Criminal Justice Systems

Prerequisite: CRIM 102. A comprehensive assessment of the historical evolution of the criminal justice system, including current status, victim rights, and future growth, theory (A)and (B) practices relating to (C).

Units: 3

CRIM 204. Quantitative Methods and Analysis

Prerequisites: CRIM 170. Methods of analysis of multivariate data: including multiple regression, logistic regression and factor analysis. Computer statistical packages, applicatons, and analysis of data.

Units: 3

CRIM 205. Qualitative Methods and Analysis

Examines a range of qualitative research methods and analysis, including theory and strategies, techniques of data collection and writing strategies relevant to qualitative research. Topics covered include interpretative theories, instrument development, interview techniques, ethnography, content analysis and inductive analytic methods.

Units: 3

CRIM 216. Essentials of Homeland Security

This course focuses on Homeland Security, terrorism, and theories of security, risk management, and national security strategy. An overview of key agencies and the legal and privacy issues inherent in balancing law and order with Constitutional rights and liberties.

Units: 3

CRIM 217. Radical Ideologies

Students will acquire an understanding of how ordinary individuals can acquire extraordinary philosophies that disrupt governance, derail the status quo, and often erupt into violent conflict.

Units: 3

CRIM 218. Intelligence Theory

Intelligence Theory is a course intended so that students can acquire an understanding of how the acquisition, analysis, and dissemination of information to generate criminal intelligence can be facilitated in a free society.

Units: 3

CRIM 219. Border and Homeland Security

This course focuses on border and homeland security, terrorism, risk management, and national security strategy. Comparative approach to key agencies, policies and legal issues in securing international borders, critical infrastructure protection and related economic analysis in security, transportation, and immigration policy.

Units: 3

CRIM 220. Seminar in Group Therapy in Criminal Justice Agencies

Prerequisites: admission to the criminology graduate program. The theory and practice of group therapy in criminal justice agencies. Use of transactional analysis concepts in describing group interactions.

Units: 3

CRIM 221. Seminar in Family Counseling in Criminal Justice Agencies

Prerequisites: admission to the criminology graduate program. The theory and practice of family counseling in criminal justice agencies.

Units: 3

CRIM 252. Seminar in Criminal Justice Personnel Administration

Prerequisites: admission to the criminology graduate program. The historical development of modern personnel theory and practice in criminal justice agencies; manpower, merit concepts, concepts of man and work, classification, training and compensation, collective bargaining, and organizational communication.

Units: 3

CRIM 255. Seminar in Criminal Justice Labor Relations

Prerequisites: admission to the criminology graduate program. The historical development of labor relations theory and practice in criminal justice agencies; legislation, court decisions, collective bargaining agreements, arbitration awards and fact-finding, and administrative law decisions.

Units: 3

CRIM 265. Sex Crimes

Sex offenders are explored from epidemiological, psychological and etiological underpinnings and constraints as they relate to power, sex, gender and psychopathology. Attention given to the role of paraphilia and the vast array of sexual predators, lust killers, paraphilic stalkers and the mentally disordered sex offender. (Formerly CRIM 270T)

Units: 3

CRIM 270T. Problems in Criminology

Prerequisites: Admission to the criminoly graduate program. Special problems in law enforcement or corrections; individual research in laboratory, library, or fieldwork;formal written reports. Weekly conference with instructor.

Units: 3-6, Repeatable up to 12 units

CRIM 270T. Officer Liability

This course explores the fundamental issues that arise in litigation to redress constitutional and statutory violations under 42 U.S.C., Sec. 1983 by persons acting under color of state law. This exploration will primarily focus on case law and the ways key provisions have been interpreted by the Supreme Court of the United States and the Circuit Courts. A basic puppies of this course is to provide critical thinking applications in: a) distinguishing fact from judgment, and belief from knowledge; b) the relationship of language and logic -- particularly in dealing with statutory interpretation; c) reaching factual or judgmental conclusions after evaluating arguments; and, d) argumentation covering various sides of an issue.

Units: 3

CRIM 275. Victimology and Social Change

Prerequisite: admission to the criminology graduate program. Theories and scientific research on the effects of crime on victims. An analysis of victim rights and services with specific review agencies and programs of community change. Models and strategies of understanding and assisting crime victims will be analyzed. (Formerly CRIM 270T)

Units: 3

CRIM 281. Supervised Professional Experience

Open only to criminology majors. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and selected agency. Supervised professional experience in law enforcement or correctional work. Approved for SP grading. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 1-6

CRIM 290. Independent Study

See Academic Planning-- Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

CRIM 292. Readings in Criminology

Prerequisites: permission of instructor and chair, Criminology Graduate Committee. Individually directed readings in an area of special concern to the student's graduate program; appropriate written reports and evaluation required, individual student conferences. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3

CRIM 295. Controversial Issues in Crime, Criminology and Law

Prerequisites: CRIM 200, CRIM 201, CRIM 202, and CRIM 203. An inclusive overview of controversial issues in criminology and law with an emphasis upon critical thinking, organization, decision-making and writing skills. An apogean experience involving the integration of graduate-level scholarly knowledge related to the study of criminology. (Formerly CRIM 270T)

Units: 3

CRIM 298. Project

Prerequisites: CRIM 200, CRIM 201, CRIM 202, and CRIM 203. See Criteria for Thesis and Project. Preparation and completion of a project demonstrating a significant undertaking such as implementing a program, evaluating an ongoing program, developing pilot studies of innovative ideas or implementing organizational change in the field of criminology, and submission of a written abstract. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 3-6

CRIM 298C. Project Continuation

Pre-requisite: Project CRIM 298. For continuous enrollment while completing the project. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

CRIM 299. Thesis

Prerequisites: CRIM 200, CRIM 201, CRIM 202, and CRIM 203. See Criteria for Thesis and Project. Preparation, completion, and submission of an acceptable thesis for the master's degree. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 3-6

CRIM 299C. Thesis Continuation

Pre-requisite: Thesis CRIM 299. For continuous enrollment while completing the thesis. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

FBS 228. Eyewitness Evidence

Primarily for those students interested in research careers in criminal sciences. Topics include vision and audition, attention, memory, mental representation, physiological factors, and information processing in the context of eyewitness identification and memory.

Units: 3

FBS 265. Failure Analysis

Prerequisites: FBS 201, FBS 202, FBS 203, FBS 204, FBS 205, FBS 261, FBS 262, FBS 263, & FBS 264. Focus on understanding the way materials fail. Effects of high temperatures, mechanical deformation and corrosion on the properties of materials. Forensics and methodologies for investigating materials' failures including optical microscopy, x-ray analysis and scanning electron microscopy discussed.

Units: 3

FBS 299C. Thesis Continuation

Pre-requisite: Thesis 298. For continuous enrollment while completing the thesis. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

Requirements

Criminology Minor Requirements

CRIM 2, 20, 100(9 units)
Upper-division CRIM electives (12 units)
Total (21 units)

CRIM 100, 120, and 153 may still be used to meet requirements for both General Education and the minor, for catalogs prior to the 1999-2000 General Catalog.

Note: The Criminology Minor also requires a 2.0 GPA and 6 upper-division units in residence.

This interdisciplinary minor is open to students in any academic discipline or chosen profession.

Faculty

The criminology department consists of 13 full-time faculty members whose expertise includes numerous specialties in the criminal justice system, including corrections, counseling, victimology, juvenile delinquency, theory, legal studies, supervision and management, and criminal justice administration. Various part-time faculty members from major criminal justice agencies also instruct in the department.

Name Degree Email Phone
Acosta-Mabrey, Rosalinda Master of Science racosta@csufresno.edu
Azizian, Allen Doctor of Philosophy aazizian@csufresno.edu
Blohm, Joseph K Master of Science josephbl@csufresno.edu
Button, Lynn E Master of Science lynnb@csufresno.edu 559.278.2243
Clement, Keith Doctor of Philosophy kclement@csufresno.edu 559.278.1011
Dadian, Neil G Master of Science nedadian@csufresno.edu
Dull, R T Doctor of Philosophy tomd@csufresno.edu 559.278.3914
Dussich, John P Doctor of Philosophy jdussich@csufresno.edu 559.278.6046
English, Peter Doctor of Philosophy penglish@csufresno.edu 559.278.2329
Farmer, Patrick F Doctor of Psychology pfarmer@csufresno.edu
Frausto Heredia, Delia Bachelor of Science dheredia@csufresno.edu
Herbert, James E Master of Arts jherbert@csufresno.edu
Herzog, Marilyn S Master of Science marimm@csufresno.edu
Hickey, Eric W Doctor of Philosophy erich@csufresno.edu 559.278.2803
Hickman, Katherine A Doctorate of Education katherineh@csufresno.edu
Hughes, Emma J Doctor of Philosophy emhughes@csufresno.edu 559.278.2370
Jackson, Jerome E Doctor of Philosophy jeromej@csufresno.edu 559.278.2807
Kams, Timothy A Juris Doctor tkams@csufresno.edu
Kieckhaefer, Jenna M Doctor of Philosophy jkieckhaefer@csufresno.edu
Kikuchi, George Doctor of Philosophy gkikuchi@csufresno.edu 559.278.4223
Kissner, Michael J Doctor of Philosophy mkissner@csufresno.edu 559.278.2369
LiCalsi, Ernest J Juris Doctor elicalsi@csufresno.edu
Magarian, Steve D Master of Science magarian@csufresno.edu
Marshall, Hollianne E Doctor of Philosophy holmarshall@csufresno.edu
Masters, Ruth Doctorate of Education ruthm@csufresno.edu 559.278.5712
McDonald, Robert E Master of Science bobmc@csufresno.edu
Muscat, Bernadette T Doctor of Philosophy bmuscat@csufresno.edu 559.278.1012
Owen, Barbara A Doctor of Philosophy barbarao@csufresno.edu 559.278.5715
Owen, John M Juris Doctor joowen@csufresno.edu
Park, Gordon M Juris Doctor gopark@csufresno.edu
Parker, Lissa H Master of Arts liparker@csufresno.edu
Patton, Steven H Master of Science spatton@csufresno.edu
Price-Sharps, Jana L Master of Science jpricesharps@csufresno.edu
Ryan, Kenneth J Doctor of Philosophy kjryan@csufresno.edu 559.278.2379
Schweizer, Harald O Doctor of Philosophy haralds@csufresno.edu 559.278.8880
Shuler, Charles J Master of Science cshuler@csufresno.edu
Skrapec, Candice A Doctor of Philosophy candices@csufresno.edu 559.278.3985
Tafoya, Marcus K Master of Arts mtafoya@csufresno.edu
Takahashi, Yoshiko Doctor of Philosophy ytakahashi@csufresno.edu 559.278.4800
Torres, Stephanie N Master of Science storres@csufresno.edu
Tucker, Judith L Master of Science juditht@csufresno.edu
Valdovinos, Miguel Juris Doctor mvaldovinos@csufresno.edu
Walker, Steven D Doctor of Philosophy stevend@csufresno.edu 559.278.2803
Wint, Arthur V Juris Doctor arthurw@csufresno.edu 559.278.7027