Construction Management, B.S.

Department

Construction Management

Manoochehr Zoghi, Coordinator
Engineering East Building, Room 192
559.278.6056
www.fresnostate.edu/engineering

Degrees and Programs Offered

BS in Construction Management, B.S.
MN in Construction Management, Minor

The Bachelor of Science in Construction Management is accredited by the American Council for Construction Education, the professional accreditation organization of the construction industry.

Students in construction management (CM) are exposed to a wide variety of topics, ranging from courses in management and administration of construction companies, projects, people, and equipment to courses focusing on specific techniques for project planning and control work improvement and estimating. The Construction Management program also provides opportunities to develop a strong background in computer applications in construction. Computer skills combined with a solid management and technical background are major assets of the construction management graduate.

Opportunities for construction management graduates are excellent. Examples of positions held by construction management graduates are project manager, construction manager, project administrator, estimator, scheduler, architectural representative, project superintendent, and construction administrator. Students should consider this challenging, satisfying, and high-paying profession.

Mission of Construction Management

The mission of the Construction Management Program is to develop character, build leaders, and sustain learning.

Educational Objectives of the Instructional Program

  • Provide students with the ability to recognize and independently diagnose construction related problems accurately, develop creative alternatives, and implement practical and effective solutions.
  • Provide students with the ability to plan, schedule, and control work activities; motivate and provide accurate and timely constructive alternatives; and implement practical and effective solutions.
  • Provide students with the ability to apply construction related techniques, skills, and tools to construction materials as necessary for a managed construction project.
  • Provide students with the ability to understand technical issues related to the fields of architecture, engineering, business and construction accounting, and finance. Work effectively and efficiently with personnel from these disciplines to properly apply related fundamentals, techniques, and procedures.
  •  Provide students with the ability to apply basic construction related design theory within the areas of structural, mechanical, electrical, thermodynamics, civil, and soil mechanics.

Courses

Construction Management

CM 1S. Construction Management Orientation

An overview of construction management education and profession. Introduction to the construction industry, career opportunities, leadership/personality assessment, sustainability, ethics, safety, community service, and university experience. Course work requires 20 hours of service learning in construction.

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CM 4. Construction Graphics

Co-requisite: CM 1S. Introduction to fundamentals and techniques to communicate graphically in the construction industry. Plan reading, architectural drawing, sketching, drafting methods, computer aided design, and building information modeling. Survey of architectural form and function. Study includes application of building codes and regulations. (2 Lec, 3 Lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CM 5. Construction Materials

Introduction to basic construction materials: concrete, masonry, metals, woods, thermal materials, finishes, equipment, and specialties. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours; field trips)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CM 7S. Construction Materials & Basic Building Systems

Prerequisite: CM 4. Introduction to basic construction materials and exploration of theoretic principles relating to the various building sytems. Course work requires 20 hours of service learning in construction. Lectures, lab, field trips, and guest speakers. (2 Lec, 3 Lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CM 15. Construction Management Software

Introduction to construction industry software and project documentation. Basic instruction in estimating, scheduling, design, and project control software. Designed to provide an overview of those particular software packages used in subsequent construction management coursework. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CM 20. Construction Contracts & Specifications

Corequisite CM 7S. Principles of Business Law and methods for developing and applying construction contracts and specifications, including bidding requirements, bonds and insurance, certificates, agenda, change orders, general and supplementary conditions, and CSI specifications. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3

CM 31. Architectural Graphics

Prerequisite: CM 5. Introduction to basic techniques and media used in architectural graphic communication including: perspective techniques, sciagraphy, models, and photography; emphasis on various ways of making drawn representations of architectural design proposals. (6 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CM 32. Architectural Design

Introduction to architectural design theory; analysis of architectural design problems, assessment of human needs, establishment of architectural design criteria and development of architectural design concept. (6 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CM 42. Architectural Drawing

Architectural drafting techniques and standards progressing from fundamentals to details in the area of light construction design through the use of sketching, drafting methods and computer aided design. Study includes the application of building codes and regulations. (6 lab hours)

Units: 3

CM 43. Computer-Aided Construction Detailing

Prerequisite: CM 42. Application of computers to planning and details for wood, concrete, masonry, and steel structures. (6 lab hours) (Formerly CONST 142)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CM 50. Basic Building Systems

Prerequisite: CM 5, CM 42. Exploration of theoretic principles relating to the various building systems. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours; field trips)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CM 105. Construction Structures

Prerequisites: CM 5, 50; PHYS 2A; MATH 75. Properties, strength, and functional applications of basic construction materials: woods, metals, and concrete. Recent developments in new materials and applications. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours; field trips)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CM 107. Advanced Construction Structures

Prerequisite: CM 105. Analysis of construction materials in its application to different structural systems. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CM 110. Estimating and Bidding

Prerequisite: CM 20. Basic method used to evaluate, fix cost, calculate worth, make accurate quantity take-offs and labor time estimates; preparing bids for prospective buyers. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CM 116. Scheduling and Control

Prerequisites: CM 110. Critical path method; planning, scheduling, and control of construction projects including logic, time assignment and computation, analysis, replanning, diagramming practices, monitoring and updating, computer utilization; role of management. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CM 122. Construction Laws

Prerequisite: CM 20. Orientation to the rules and regulations governing construction industry practices and activities including contractors license law, state lien laws, health and safety regulations, personnel relations and supervision, workers compensation, employment insurance and taxes.

Units: 3

CM 124. Construction Labor Law

Prerequisites: CM 122. Study of federal and state labor-oriented regulations as applied to construction industry practices. Interaction between technical and legal aspects of collective bargaining, pre-hire agreements, hiring hall referrals, open shop construction, work force managemnet, labor standards, employment discrimination, strikes, and picketing.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CM 127. Construction Soils and Foundation

Not open to civil engineering majors. Prerequisite: upper-level standing. Physical and mechanical properties of soil, construction applications of soils engineering design, field control during construction, field problems and remedial measures, and case histories.

Units: 3

CM 131. Advanced Architectural Graphics

Prerequisite: CM 7S and upper division standing. Architectural graphic techniques as tools of three dimensional analysis and representation in the design process. (6 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

CM 132. Advanced Architectural Design

Prerequisite: CM 131 and upper division standing. Development of understanding of the forces affecting the man-made environment through function identification, systems analysis, and development of architectural design solutions to problems at an intermediate level of complexity. (6 lab hours)

Units: 3

CM 134. Architectural Design Problems

Prerequisites: CM 116, CM 132. Conceptual planning and design of a large scale architectural project responding to the built environment. Employing team research and analysis leading to the design and presentation on individual solutions with graphic and three-dimensional techniques. (6 lab hours)

Units: 3

CM 140. Building Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing

Prerequisites: CM 7S and CM 20. Survey of building mechanical, electrical, and plubming systems. Orientation to the design fundamentals and construction of various sustainable and environmentally friendly systems and equipment. Lectures, field trips, and guest speakers. (2 Lec, 3 Lab hours)

Units: 3

CM 144. Construction Site Planning and Development

Prerequisite: CM 116; senior standing. Analysis of land development; site investigation, grading, street piping systems, and landscaping. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours; field trips)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CM 150. Building Construction

Prerequisites: CM 116; CE 121. Problems and methods of solutions in the construction of buildings; site; excavations, foundations, framework, timber, reinforced concrete, structural steel, masonry construction and related elements. Satisfies the senior major requirement for the B.S. in Construction Management. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours; field trips)

Units: 3

CM 151. Heavy Civil Construction

Prerequisites: senior standing or permission of instructor; CM 116; CE 121, CE 127. Problems and methods of solutions in heavy construction from earth moving, paving, compacting to tunneling; administrative procedures, quantity surveying, estimating, scheduling, and bidding. ( 2 lecture, 2 lab hours, field trips)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CM 162. Mechanical Systems I

Prerequisites: CM 50. Mechanical systems for heating, ventilating, air conditioning, plumbing, storm drainage, and sewage disposal systems in commercial, industrial, residential construction; heat loss and gain, solar systems, mechanical system sizing, and life cycle cost analysis. Lectures, field trips, and guest speakers.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CM 164. Building Electrical Systems

Prerequisites: CM 50. Electrical systems for power, light, heat, signals, and communications in commercial, industrial, and residential buildings. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours; field trips)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

CM 166. Mechanical Systems II

Prerequisite: CM 162. Construction application of water systems, plumbing and storm drainage, and sewage disposal systems.

Units: 3

CM 170. Construction Project Controls

Prerequisite: CM 116. Development and application of contruction project control systems; principles of construction project and business management; methods of cost, schedule, quality, safety, and change management; survey of construction accounting and finance. (2 Lec, 2 Lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CM 177. Sustainable Construction

Prerequisite: CM 7S. To provide an overview of emerging delivery systems for high performance green buildings and the basis on which their sustainability can be evaluated. Green Building rating systems will be discussed. Lectures, lab, field trips, and guest speakers. (2 Lec, 2 Lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CM 180AS. Construction Management Capstone 1

Prerequisite: CM 116, Senior Standing. Prepare conceptual design, implementation of sustainable materials, assess structural components and utilize passive building for Alternative Housing Design. Course works will involve 20 hours of service learning in construction. Lab, field trips and guest speakers (formerly CONST 191T) (3 lab hours)

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CM 180B. Construction Management Capstone 2

Prerequisite: CM 180AS. The construction manager's relation to internal organization, owner, architect, engineer, public, press, leagal aid, unions, trades, equipment, utilities, insurance, finances, government, and others. Lectures, lab, field trips, and guest speakers. (formerly CONST 114) (2 Lec, 3 Lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CM 181. Construction Management Senior Seminar

Prerequisite: Senior Standing. Presentation and discussion of current construction management practices. Standards of professionalism, leadership, and ethics. Professional practice issues and professional licensure.

Units: 1

CM 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- [-LINK-]. Approved for SP grading. (Course fee variable)

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CM 191T. Construction Management Team Building

Team building and problem specific preparation for construction management competitions. Course will focus on developing skills for teamwork, leadership, public speaking, and proposal preparation, as well as problem specific technical skills.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

CM 191T. Sustainable Home Design and Construction

The course will focus on creating entrepreneurial solutions to designing and building sustainable homes. Topics include efficient design of systems, energy efficiency, architectural design, site planning, life cycle cost analysis, and ownership costs evaluation. Students will create business cases, design documents, and construction plans. (2 lecture hours; 2 activity hours).

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

CM 191T. Advanced Construction Structures Lab

Application of Principles and methods of testing to verify theory and determine limitations of principles of construction materials.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 6 units

CM 191T. Introduction to Demolition and Reconstruction Management

This course introduces the opportunities and challenges in demolition and reconstruction management. Topics include: introduction to industry regulation, project planning, labor and equipment utilization, techniques and technologies, hazardous materials, issues involving historic properties, material reuse and recycling, safety and risk management, estimating, demolition operations, issues of ethics, and typical company organization.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

CM 191T. Technical Topics in Construction

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Investigation and analysis of selected subjects in construction. (2-6 lab hours)

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

CM 193. Internship/Work Experience

Open only to construction majors. Prerequisites: junior standing and permission of instructor. Supervised work experience in construction related industries. Periodic consultations with instructor.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Requirements

Bachelor of Science Degree - Construction Management Major Requirements

Program Description

The Bachelor of Science in Construction Management is accredited by the American Council for Construction Education, the professional accreditation organization of the construction industry.

Students in construction management (CM) are exposed to a wide variety of topics, ranging from courses in management and administration of construction companies, projects, people, and equipment to courses focusing on specific techniques for project planning and control work improvement and estimating. The Construction Management program also provides opportunities to develop a strong background in computer applications in construction. Computer skills combined with a solid management and technical background are major assets of the construction management graduate.

Opportunities for construction management graduates are excellent. Examples of positions held by construction management graduates are project manager, construction manager, project administrator, estimator, scheduler, architectural representative, project superintendent, and construction administrator. Students should consider this challenging, satisfying, and high-paying profession.

Mission of Construction Management

The mission of the Construction Management Program is to develop character, build leaders, and sustain learning.

Educational Objectives of the Instructional Program

  • Provide students with the ability to recognize and independently diagnose construction related problems accurately, develop creative alternatives, and implement practical and effective solutions.
  • Provide students with the ability to plan, schedule, and control work activities; motivate and provide accurate and timely constructive alternatives; and implement practical and effective solutions.
  • Provide students with the ability to apply construction related techniques, skills, and tools to construction materials as necessary for a managed construction project.
  • Provide students with the ability to understand technical issues related to the fields of architecture, engineering, business and construction accounting, and finance. Work effectively and efficiently with personnel from these disciplines to properly apply related fundamentals, techniques, and procedures.
  • Provide students with the ability to apply basic construction related design theory within the areas of structural, mechanical, electrical, thermodynamics, civil, and soil mechanics.

Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements
Construction Management Major

Pre-construction management requirements (16 units)
CM 1S, 4, 7S, 20; CE 20; GME 15 and 15L

Upper-division core requirements (28 units)
CM 110, 116, 122, 140, 170, 180A(S), 180B, 181, 193; CE 121, 121L, and 127

Construction Management Electives (9 units)
Sector Electives (3 units)
Select one course from the following: CM 134, 150, 151, or 166

Construction Technology Electives (3 units)
Select one course from the following: CM 131 or 191T

Construction Methods Electives (3 units)
Select one course from the following: CM 132, CM 144, or CE 130

Other requirements (67 units)
General Education (41 units)
Select one course from each of the G.E. areas: Area A1, A2, A3, B2, C1, C2, D1, D2, and IC. (See G.E. listings). The following courses are required to satisfy both G.E. and major requirements: PHYS 4A and 4AL [Bl], MATH 75 [B4], ECON 40 or 50

[D3], BA 104 [M/I]

Additional requirements (26 units)
MATH 76; EES 1 or CHEM 3A; DS 73; ACCT 4A; MGT 104; two business electives (see Business Electives below); BA 105W or ENGR 105W (see Upper-Division Writing Skills requirement below.) CM 180B satisfies the G.E. IB requirement.

  • Business Electives (6 units) 
    Select two courses from the following: upper-division business administration courses, CM 124, or courses approved by the academic adviser.
  • Upper-division writing skills requirement (3 units) 
    Construction management majors must select either BA 105W or ENGR 105W. The Upper-Division Writing Exam is not an option for construction management majors.

Total (120 units)*

* Note: Construction management majors are exempt from G.E. third course Area C, Area E, and Area ID.

Pre-Construction Management Requirements

All construction management students entering California State University, Fresno are considered pre-construction management majors and are coded as such. In order to enroll in 100-level construction management courses, pre-construction management students must do the following:

(a) Complete all of the following courses: MATH 75, MATH 76, PHYS 4A, PHYS 4AL, CM 1S, CM 4, CM 7S, CM 20, CE 20, GME 15, and GME 15L; (b) attain a "C" in six of the 11 courses listed above, with no course to be repeated more than twice; and (c) have a cumulative and campus grade point average of at least 2.00.

Advising Notes

  1. Courses in mathematics and the physical sciences taken CR/NC are not counted toward fulfillment of degree requirements in construction.
  2. The Upper-Division Writing Skills requirement must be met by completing a "W" course with a letter grade of C or better no sooner than the term in which 60 units of coursework are completed.
  3. All construction management students must consult with their academic advisers at least once per academic year.

Faculty

Name Degree Email Phone
Crask, Lloyd A Master of Business Admin lloydc@csufresno.edu 559.278.8745
Hyatt, Brad Master of Science bhyatt@csufresno.edu 559.278.7735
Leath, Charles Juris Doctor cleath@csufresno.edu 559.278.6056
Luo, Yupeng Doctor of Philosophy viluo@csufresno.edu 559.278.1792
Mccurley, Eric W Bachelor of Science hss0p@mail.fresnostate.edu
Wu, Wei Doctor of Philosophy weiwu@csufresno.edu
Young, Melvin A Bachelor of Science myoung@mail.fresnostate.edu

Careers

Engineering Career Day

Construction Management is an interdisciplinary program that is committed to educating the future professionals in the construction industry. These professionals, who are known as constructors, will execute architectural designs, apply engineering principles, manage project resources, and represent suppliers and manufacturers in the construction industry.

What You Can Earn

Average starting salaries for Construction Management graduates: $45,000-$50,000

Building Inspector
$49,444 (in our region)

Estimator, Sr.
$62,906 (in our region)

Field Engineer I - Construction
$56,906 (in our region)

Source: HR reported data from salary.com as of December 2012

What You Can Do

  • Become a Licensed California Contractor
  • Become a Licensed California Architect
  • Become a Certified Professional Constructor

Interesting Classes You Might Take

  • Architectural Design
  • Basic Building Systems
  • Construction Laws
  • Construction Site Planning and Development

What You Can Learn

  • Construction materials and their application to different structural systems
  • Federal and State labor-oriented regulations as applied to construction industry practices
  • Conceptual planning and design of a large-scale architectural project

About the College

The Lyles College of Engineering is the only publicly supported engineering college in the San Joaquin Valley. The mission of the college includes developing each student's potential to the greatest extent possible, provide a quality engineering education to all students and to serve students from groups that historically have not participated in a university education.

Contact the College

Office of the Dean
2320 E. San Ramon Avenue MS/EE94
Fresno CA 93740-8030

(559) 278-2500
FAX: (559) 278-4475
Campus Mail Stop: M/S EE94

Office Location:
Room 124 in the Engineering East Building, on San Ramon east of Jackson Avenue.

Department Contact Information

Engineering East Building Room 192

(559) 278-6056

(559) 278-4475 FAX

Mailing Address:

Construction Management Program
California State University, Fresno
2320 E. San Ramon Ave. MS/EE94
Fresno CA 93740-8030