Communicative Disorders - Deaf Studies Option, B.A.

Requirements

Department

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements

Communicative Disorders Major - Deaf Studies Option

1. Major requirements - Deaf Studies Option (46 units)

Required 34 units: CSDS 80, 90, 93, 94S, 95, 96, 98, 106, 136S, 137, 139, 141
Select 12 units from the following: CFS 113; COMM 103, 108; GERON 161; RA 113, 121, 125; SWRK 125, 135, 136; COUN 102, 150, 174, 176

2. General Education requirements (49 units)*

3. Other requirements (6 units)
Upper-division writing and Multicultural and International (MI)

4. Sufficient elective units to meet required total units (varies)
Courses may be used to satisfy credential requirements or a minor in another field. See advising notes 4 and 5 for recommended electives.

5. Total units (120)**

* CSDS 92 in G.E. Breadth C2 also may be applied to the communicative disorders major for students in the deaf education and interpreting options.

** G.E. and MI courses can be double-counted with major requirements. The writing requirement may be met by taking the upper-division writing exam.  See advisor for details.

 

Advising Notes

  1. CR/NC grading is not permitted for CSDS majors for any coursework required in the major, with the exception of clinical courses. (See course descriptions.)
  2. General Education and elective units may be used toward a double major or minor (see Double Major or departmental minor). Consult the appropriate department chair, program coordinator, or faculty advisor for further information.
  3. Students in CSDS 110, 162, 163, 164, and other clinical, internship, and student teaching courses are required to show health certification that they are free from tuberculosis and rubella, and to purchase student clinic malpractice insurance for the clinical courses (see the University Speech and Hearing Clinic director for details).
  4. PSYCH 101 is a required credential course that can also be used as an undergraduate elective.
  5. A statistics course is a prerequisite to CSDS 200, which is typically taken the first semester of graduate work. It is recommended that students take statistics as an undergraduate elective prior to applying to graduate school.

 

Faculty

For faculty phone numbers and e-mail, see the campus directory.

For more on the faculty, see the faculty pages.
The faculty pages are updated by the department or program.

Roadmap

B.A. Communicative Disorders - Deaf Studies Option

A Roadmap identifies the specific set of courses students must complete in their major in sequential order. Information on corequisites or prerequisites is listed along with other pertinent information to assist students in completing courses towards the major.

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Careers

Assisting a deaf child in a learning situation

Audiology, speech-language pathology, deaf education and interpreting are concerned with many issues related to speech, hearing, and language. Professionals in these fields are devoted to providing diagnostic, rehabilitative, and educational services to children and adults with communicative challenges.

The department offers course work towards the completion of a degree with an emphasis in Communicative Disorders (Audiology or Speech Language Pathology) and Deaf Studies (ASL Instruction, Deaf Education, or Sign Language Interpreting).

What You Can Earn

Audiologist - $71,209 (In our region)

Speech Pathologist - $71,272 (In our region)

(Source: HR reported data from salary.com as of December 2012)

Teacher of the deaf - $55,400 (in our region)

Sign Language Interpreter - $45,000 (in our region)

(Source: HR reported data from salary.com as of August 2010)

Interesting Classes You Might Take

  • Introduction to Communicative Disorders
  • Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech Hearing Mechanisms
  • Education of Exceptional Children
  • Treatment Procedures in Communicative Disorders
  • American Sign Language courses
  • Deaf Literature
  • Deaf Culture

What You Can Learn

  • About deaf children in general, parent education, and various educational programs and services for deaf children and their parents
  • Signing skills and different models/systems of communication used with deaf and hard-of-hearing students, adolescents, and adults.
  • Physiological acoustics, psychoacoustics, acoustic phonetics, and perception of speech.
  • American Sign Language, its cultural/historical background, the role it plays in the deaf community, and its growing influence in American mainstream society.
  • Assessment and treatment procedures for individuals with communicative disorders in a variety of educational and medical settings.

About the College

The College of Health and Human Services offers a broad range of fully accredited post-secondary and graduate educational programs to more than 2100 students each year. The College includes the Departments of Communicative Disorders and Deaf Studies, Gerontology, Kinesiology, Nursing, Physical Therapy, Public Health, Recreation Administration, and Social Work Education.

Residents and communities in the Central California region continue to face serious issues within the health and human service environment that will require continuing generations of well-prepared health and human service professionals.

College Contact Information

2345 E. San Ramon
M/S MH26
Fresno CA 93740-8031

Phone: (559) 278-4004

FAX: (559) 278-4437

Department Contact Information

Department of Communicative Sciences and Deaf Studies
5310 N. Campus Drive M/S PH 80
Fresno, CA 93740-8019

Phone: (559) 278-2423
FAX: (559) 278-5187