Anthropology, B.A.

Department

Department of Anthropology

John H. Pryor, Chair
Peters Business Building, Room 385
559.278.3002
FAX: 559.278.7234
www.fresnostate.edu/anthropology/

Degrees and Programs Offered

BA in Anthropology, B.A.
MN in American Indian Studies, Minor
MN in Anthropology, Minor
MN in Asian American Studies, Minor
MN in Southeast Asian Studies, Minor

Anthropology is concerned with everything that is human, in all parts of the world, both present and past. It is unique among the social sciences in its scope. Most disciplines focus only on modern civilization or concentrate on single aspects of life, such as government or the economy. Anthropology is interested in all human societies and views life as a complexly integrated whole that is more than the sum of its parts. It is the human experience as a whole that anthropology seeks to understand.

The breadth of anthropology is reflected in its four subfields. Physical anthropology studies biological evolution and how heredity conditions the ways we conduct life. Cultural anthropology, by studying the enormous diversity of lifeways in contemporary cultures throughout the world, attempts to explain both differences and similarities in the way different peoples carry out the process of living. Archaeology explores the human past far beyond the range of written records, using specialized techniques to probe human prehistory. Linguistic anthropology investigates the nature of language and the critical role it has played in developing our unique intellectual capabilities and behavior. The central concept in anthropology is "culture," and it is this vital idea which binds the subfields into an integrated discipline.

Our program has three goals:

  • to provide students with a clear conception of human variability and its implications, enabling them to understand and deal with lifestyles other than those of "mainstream America;"
  • to provide students with the broad intellectual skills that are essential to the widest range of professional careers;and
  • to prepare students to use anthropological concepts in both applied and research careers.

Both the anthropology major and minor offer a varied but well-structured exposure to all four subfields of the discipline. The major consists of two parts. The core curriculum introduces both data and theory in a logical sequence of courses from basic to advanced and includes an introduction to anthropological fieldwork. The four degree tracks are intended to prepare students for specific careers in the following areas: education, cultural resources management, social services, or post-secondary teaching. The minor is a briefer but balanced survey of the discipline, designed to complement any major whose graduates need to understand and deal with people from different cultural backgrounds.

Special Resources and Facilities

Directed by professors LaJeunesse and Pryor, the Anthropology Department provides data collection, analysis, and student training in both archaeological and ethnographic studies. Advanced students may also pursue specialized training and research into the chemical composition of archaeological materials in our chemistry laboratory, which is under the supervision of Professor LaJeunesse. C. Kristina Roper manages our contract archaeology program, which provides students with practical experience in public archaeology.

Courses

Anthropology

AIS 5. American Indian History

An interpretive survey of American Indian history from the native point of view including accounts of American Indian origin and the arrival of immigrants from Asia, Africa, and Europe.

Units: 3

AIS 9T. Topics in American Indian Studies

Selected topics at an introductory level in American Indian Studies.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 9 units

AIS 50. Contemporary Life of the American Indian

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. Current problems of American Indians and Arctic Natives resulting from culture conflict, acculturation, minority status, and governmental policy. G.E. Breadth D3

Units: 3
GE Area: D3

AIS 65T. Topics in Indian Education

Foundations and history of Indian education, methods of teaching Indian children, curriculum and practices for Indian education, guidance for the Indian student, problems of teachers of Indian children, education of Indian adults.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 9 units

AIS 90. Intro to American Indian Religion

Introduction to the concepts of religion and belief systems in American Indian societies. Examines American Indian religion as an integration of culture, geography, economic activity, social obligations and environmental responsibilities. Explores conflicts and adaptations with non-Native religious systems.

Units: 3

AIS 100. American Indian Religion

American Indian religious systems, including basic concepts of religion and the sacred, ceremonial life, medicine, functions of religious institutions and practices, and contrast/conflict with non-Native religious systems.

Units: 3

AIS 101. American Indian Law

Concepts of laws on Indian reservations, termination, litigation and complaints, strengthening tribal governments. Law related to Indian land and resources.

Units: 3

AIS 103. Indians of California

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Survey course on the ancient cultures of California, historical development of California Indian cultures according to regional resources, conflict between the California Indian people and various colonial forces, arts and culture of California Indian people, and contemporary issues of California Indians.

Units: 3
GE Area: ID

AIS 160. The Politics of Indian Education

This seminar examines the interaction of politics, culture, and education, using case studies of federal financing of Indian education in the mission, Bureau of Indian Affairs, tribal, and public school systems.

Units: 3

AIS 170. Experience in American Indian Community

Offers students supervised field experience working for a tribe, tribal/Indian organization, tribal school or Indian education program, public agency, or the university's Indian organizations.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

AIS 189. Fieldwork in Community Relations

Supervised field observation, participation, and documentation in the operation of minority communities.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

AIS 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

ANTH 2. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Prequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. Examines the nature of culture, humanity's unique mechanism for adapting to the changing environment. Explores the varieties of human life and explains how culture has made possible the range of different and successful societies, from hunters and gatherers to industrial civilization. G.E. Breadth D3. (CAN ANTH 4)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: D3

ANTH 3. Introduction to Prehistory and Physical Anthropology

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. Examines the biological and cultural basis of being human. Compares us with our primate relatives, traces the biological and cultural evolution of our species from earliest ancestors, through the development of agriculture to the emergence of civilization. G.E. Breadth D3.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: D3

ANTH 30. Critical Thinking in Anthropology

Distinguish belief vs. knowledge and fact vs. opinion; examine relationship between language/logic; use inductive/deductive reasoning; recognize informal/formal fallacies; appreciate socio-cultural context of critical thinking. These skills are applied to topics of race/intelligence, religion/values, and social policy. Skills demonstrated/assessed through oral and written performance. G.E. Foundation A3.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
GE Area: A3

ANTH 100. Concepts and Applications

This foundation course demonstrates the use of selected core concepts in research and analysis. Acquaints students with the conceptual framework of the discipline and the basic processes of anthropological inquiry and application of knowledge. (Formerly ANTH 103)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

ANTH 101. Introductory Fieldwork in Archaeology

An introduction to basic methods for archeological excavation and site survey. The Involves a block of time in the field away from campus. Can be repeated up to two times for credit. (Class fee $75).

Units: 6-12
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ANTH 101B. Advanced Fieldwork in Archaeology

Advanced methods and strategies for archeological excavation and site survey. The course will involve a commitment by students of a block of time in the field away from campus. Not open to studnets who have taken 101B-S.

Units: 6
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ANTH 102. Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology

A compendium of current thinking on language and culture from a variety of interdisciplinary perspectives. Examines the nature of language, language description, language and worldview, gendered speech, ethnicity and language, power and performance, verbal and nonverbal art, and associated theories and research methods.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ANTH 104. History and Theory of Anthropology

Prerequisite: ANTH 100. A history of the growth of anthropological thought through an analysis of the informational and explanatory powers of five major theoretical schools: Nineteenth-century Evolutionists, British Functionalists, Boasian Historical Particularists, Neo-Evolutionists/Marxists, and Cognitivists.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ANTH 105W. Applied Anthropology

Prerequisite: G.E Foundation and Breadth Area D, satisfactory completion (C or better) of ENGL 5B or ENGL 10 graduation requirement, to be taken no sooner than the term in which 60 units are completed. Examination and assessment of the use of anthropological data and concepts to address contemporary issues in education, health care, law, environmental planning, and social services. Students work on applied problems and write observations, plans, reports, and research documents geared to the needs of professionals, service providers, and particularly planners in modern institutional contexts. (Formerly ANTH 144W)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
GE Area: M/I

ANTH 111. Ethnographic Fieldwork

An introduction to ethnographic field methods. Topics include the ethics of fieldwork, organizing data, and ethnographic writing. Students will conduct fieldwork on cultural locally. Can be repeated up to four times for credit.

Units: 3

ANTH 111B. Intermediate Ethnographic Fieldwork

Prerequisite ANTH 111A. Students conduct an enthnographic field project under the direction of the instructor, employing participant observation. Involves field trips and weekend sessions. Involves a commitment of a block of time away from campus. Not open to students who have taken 111B-S.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ANTH 115. World Cultures

An examination of contemporary issues in anthropology based on evidence from both classical and modern ethnographies. Considers strategies of qualitative research and reporting, including ethics and the application of ethnographic research in modern societies. (Formerly ANTH 129T)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ANTH 116W. Anthropology of Religion

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D, satisfactory completion (C or better) of the ENGL 5B or ENGL 10 graduation requirement, to be taken no sooner than the term in which 60 units are completed. Examines the patterned belief systems of the world's tribal, peasant, and sectarian societies. Stresses the role of religion in individual and group perception, cognition, ritual, and social organization. Topics include myth, magic, shamanism, mysticism, witchcraft, trance, hallucinogens, and cultism. Meets the upper-division writing skills requirement for graduation. G.E. Integration ID. (Formerly ANTH 150W)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
GE Area: ID

ANTH 117. Anthropology of Health, Illness, and Healing

A cross-cultural examination of health practices and cultural assumptions on which they are based. Reviews ethnomedicine, ethnopsychiatry, and epidemiology in the health care systems of diverse cultures and of ethnic communities in pluralistic societeis such as the United States. (Formerly ANTH 155)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ANTH 118. Women: Culture and Biology

(ANTH 118 same as WS 170.) A cross-cultural and interdisplinary analysis of the determinants of female statuses and circumstances. Examines theories, including biological and cultural determinism, which explain variations in the expression of sexuality, maturation, reproduction, and the life cycle. (Formerly ANTH 170)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

ANTH 119. Law and Culture

A comparative, holistic perspective on the evolution of law. Examines its natures and origins, the basic assumptions behind legal systems, their cross-cultural expression and effects, and the directionality of legal evolution. (Formerly ANTH 146)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ANTH 120. Ethnic Relations and Cultures

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. The cultural and social origins of ethnicity, and its opportunities and problems for contemporary mass societies. Offers a critical review of major theories on ethnic politics, economics, and ideology in the light of cross-cultural evidence. G.E. Multicultural/International MI. (Formerly ANTH 172)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring
GE Area: M/I

ANTH 123. Peoples and Cultures of Southeast Asia

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. An introductory survey of the cultural and historical adaptations of societies in Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam; and of Insular societies in Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines. Examines the major effects of culture contact between East and West. G.E. Multicultural/ International MI.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall
GE Area: M/I

ANTH 124. Peoples and Cultures of East Asia

Examines cultural pluralism. Considers cultural adaptations and change among minorities such as Moslems, Tibetans, and Mongolians in China, and ethnic groups of Japan and Korea. Outlines kinship, religion, organization, and technological factors in the Asiatic culture complex.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ANTH 125. Tradition and Change in China and Japan

(ANTH 125 same as HUM 140.) Examines the current aspirations and problems of the Chinese and Japanese in terms of their traditional cultures, and explains how their histories, values, world views, and intellectual traditions affect their lifestyles and their international relations today.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring
GE Area: M/I

ANTH 128. Environmental Anthropology

Examines the interactions between environment and human culture. Specific topics include theoretical and empirical trends in environmental anthropology, materialist and cognitive approaches to human-environment interactions, human culture in ecosystem perspective, religion and ecology, and contemporary environmental movements.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

ANTH 130. Peoples and Cultures of the Southwest

A survey of Native American cultures of the Southwestern United States and Northwestern Mexico from their prehistoric origins to the present. Emphasis is placed on cultural continuity and change during the past 400 years of contact with western culture. (Formerly ANTH 127)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

ANTH 135. Muslim Communities in the Middle East

A survey of both rural and urban Muslim cultures and societies in the Middle East. Emphasizes the variety of lived experiences of Islam, gender and ethnic relations, and the impact of the West.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

ANTH 138T. Topics in Cultural Anthropology

Prerequisite: varies with title. Special studies in the theory and practice of organized cooperation and conflict in nature and culture. (Formerly ANTH 149T)

Units: 1-6, Repeatable up to 12 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ANTH 140. Contemporary Archaeology

Examines archaeological theory (both historical and contemporary) as well as methods and techniques used by archaeologists to gather, analyze, and interpret data. (Formerly ANTH 106)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

ANTH 141. Prehistory of North America

Traces the development of Native American cultures from the Arctic to Mesoamerica, from the peopling of the continent to early historic times. Examines the archaeological evidence for the antiquity, spread, and variation of cultural adaptations to changing ecological conditions. (Formerly ANTH 131)

Units: 3

ANTH 142. Old World Prehistory

Examination of current knowledge of the prehistory of one area of the Old World. Chronologies, current findings, and important issues in theory method are reviewed. Consideration of these matters in relation to work in archaeology throughout the world and to work in closely related disciplines such as biology and geology. Some historic archaeology may also be included. Areas include Europe, Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and Australia. (Formerly ANTH 132)

Units: 3

ANTH 143. Archaeology and Prehistory of California

Origins and prehistory of the California Native Americans. Examination of the archaeological record, both statewide and regionally, with emphasis on adaptations to natural and social environments from 12,000 B.P. until early historic times. (Formerly ANTH 139T)

Units: 3

ANTH 145. Cultural Resources Management

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Provides an in-depth overview of historic and prehistoric cultural resources (districts, sites, buildings, and objects), their significance, and their management in the U.S. Topics include the legal context for CRM, identifying and evaluating cultural resources, assessing effects, treatment planning, and careers in CRM. G.E. Integration ID. (Formerly ANTH 139T)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall
GE Area: ID

ANTH 159T. Topics in Archaeology

Prerequisite: varies with title. Special studies in archaeological methods, techniques, history and theory, or of prehistoric culture areas not covered in the regular curriculum. (Formerly ANTH 139T)

Units: 1-6, Repeatable up to 12 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ANTH 161. Bio/Behavioral Evolution of the Human Species

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area B. Examines the evolution of the human species and its relationship to living and extinct primates. Explores the biological basis of human culture. Integrates evolutionary biology, geochronology, and anthropology in order to understand the bio/behavioral nature of modern man. G.E. Integration IB.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: IB

ANTH 162. Primates

An introduction to the study of primate biological and behavioral evolution. Explores sociobiological theory in order to explain the unity and diversity of social behavior in prosimians, monkeys, and apes.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

ANTH 163. Human Variation

A cross-cultural examination of variations in human morphology, physiology, and biochemistry. Establishes the correlation between variations in human biology and variations in climate, culture, nutrition, and disease.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

ANTH 164. Human Osteology

Introduces a range of analytic techniques for extracting information from human skeletal remains: sexing and aging, osteometry, odontometry, the examination and diagnosis of epigenetic traits and pathological lesion, and the statistical interpretation of skeletal data.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ANTH 169T. Topics in Physical Anthropology

Special studies of the discovery and interpretation of information in physical anthropology, and of the application of this subdiscipline in legal, medical, and scientific research.

Units: 1-6, Repeatable up to 12 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ANTH 169T. Forensic Anthropology

This course provides a broad overview of forensic anthropology -- an applied field of biological anthropology. The identification of skeletal and other decomposed human remains is important for both legal and humanitarian reasons. Forensic anthropologists work to deterring the age, sex, ancestry, stature, and unique features of a descendant from the skeleton. The course will also touch on the application of archaeological techniques in recovery of remains and analysis of crime scenes.

Units: 3

ANTH 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement --+ Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ANTH 192. Directed Readings

Supervised reading on a student-selected topic outside the regular curriculum, conducted through regular consultation with a faculty sponsor.

Units: 1-3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ANTH 193. Internships in Anthropology

Interns will work on a variety of tasks involving the analysis and curation of archaeological collections; design and curation of museum displays; the collection and analysis of physical anthropological data, including working with primates at local zoos; and ethnographic data collection. (Formerly ANTH 109)

Units: 1-6
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ANTH 194. Honors Thesis

Development of a student report or paper into a manuscript of professional and publishable quality. Requires approval by an Honors Committee of three faculty members. (Formerly ANTH 199)

Units: 1-3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ANTH 195. Colloquium

Each spring semester students and department faculty will meet three times to discuss current problems in the field of anthropology. These three hour seminars will be led by a faculty member. Students will be expected to do all assigned readings and complete a paper on one of the topics discussed.

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Fall

ANTH 197T. Current Topics in Anthropology

Subject matter of these courses combines topics from the various subfields of anthropology, providing the student with a more integrated view of the discipline.

Units: 1-6, Repeatable up to 12 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ASAM 15. Introduction to Asian Americans

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. Historical, social, and psychological factors in the changing status and identity of Americans from Asia. Examines variables such as cultural heritage, family organization, intergenerational conflict, and the experience of racism in the changing world of Asian Americans. G.E. Breadth D3.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: D3

ASAM 30. Japanese Americans in the United States

A survey of social adaptations and cultural changes among Japanese Americans in different communities such as California and Hawaii. Considers identity, marginality, acculturation, and cultural traditions in Japan and in American communities.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

ASAM 110. Asian American Communities

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. A multidisciplinary study of Asian American communities and their relations with the larger society. Analyzes values, lifestyles, processes of group identity and boundary maintenance, social organization, and cultural change. Examination of Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, and other Asian American subcultures. G.E. Multicultural/International MI.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: M/I

ASAM 138. Asian Amer Women

Addressses race, ethnic, and class issues from the vatage point of Asian American women. For Asian American women. For Asian AMerican and Southeas Asian communitites, the status of women has long been neglected. Yet women play an important role in the family and its economy even as tehy enter new roles in U.S. society. Helpful to students in sciences and applied fields.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

ASAM 140. Southeast Asian Americans

Since the Immigration Act of 1965 the Asian American population has grown dramatically. This course focuses on recent issues that are facing new arrivals and supplements a history of Asian American communities (e.g., ASAM 110). Useful to students in education, social work, health sciences, the social sciences, and many other fields. (Formerly ASAM 180T)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

ASAM 180T. Topics in Asian American Studies

Prerequisites: ASAM 15, permission of instructor. Detailed consideration of a single topic concerning the past or present position of Asian Americans in U.S. society.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

ASAM 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- Independent Study. Approved for SP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ASAM 195. Diversity in the United States: Race and Gender Issues

Units: 3

Requirements

Anthropology Major Requirements

Major requirements (34 units)
(see Advising Note 1)

A. CORE CURRICULUM (19 units)
(required of all majors)
ANTH 2 (3 units)
ANTH 3 (3 units)
ANTH 100 (3 units)
ANTH 101 or ANTH 111 (see note 2) (6 units)
ANTH 104 (3 units)
ANTH 195 (1 unit)

In addition to the core curriculum, each student, in consultation with an adviser, will select the following:

Elective curriculum
(15 units minimum.) Three classes within the student's area of concentration (e.g. cultural, physical, or archaeology) (9 units)
Two classes, one in each remaining subdiscipline (e.g., an archaeology student would take one cultural and one physical course) (6 units)

B. ADDITIONAL ELECTIVES
Students may benefit from additional courses to supplement their area of interest; please consult an adviser.

General Education requirements (51 units)

Second major, electives, and remaining degree requirements (35-38 units)*
(See Degree Requirements); may be used toward a double major or minor.
(See Advising Notes 3 and 4.)

Total (120 units)

Advising Notes

  1. CR/NC grading is not permitted in the anthropology major or minor unless the grading method for the course is CR/NC only.
  2. ANTH 101 and 111 must be taken for at least 6 units.
  3. Units in this category as well as in General Education, may also be applied toward a double major or minor, as appropriate. (See Double Major or departmental minor.)
  4. Students must complete 40 upper-division units as part of the requirements to earn a B.A.
  5. No General Education Integration or Multicultural/International course offered by the Anthropology Department may be used to satisfy the General Education requirements for majors in the department.

*This total indicates that ANTH 2 or 3 in G. E. Breadth D3 also may be applied to the anthropology major. Consult the department chair or faculty adviser for additional details.

Faculty

Name Degree Email Phone
Anderson, Lisa K Master of Arts lianderson@csufresno.edu 559.278.2380
Colby Bottel, SherriLynn Doctor of Philosophy slcolbybottel@csufresno.edu 559.278.4900
Delcore, Henry D Doctor of Philosophy hdelcore@csufresno.edu 559.278.2784
Dodd, Walter A Doctor of Philosophy wdodd@csufresno.edu 559.278.4899
Ettner, Charles R Doctor of Philosophy charlese@csufresno.edu 559.278.8831
LaJeunesse, Roger M Doctor of Philosophy rogerla@csufresno.edu 559.278.4900
Mullooly, James J Doctor of Philosophy jmullooly@csufresno.edu 559.278.7574
Ng, Franklin C Doctor of Philosophy frankn@csufresno.edu 559.278.5167
Pryor, John H Doctor of Philosophy johnp@csufresno.edu 559.278.5150
Renn, Erin P Master of Science erenn@csufresno.edu
Roper, C K Master of Arts ckroper@csufresno.edu 559.278.2380
Saxton, Dvera I Doctor of Philosophy dsaxton@csufresno.edu
Verin-Shapiro, Penny Master of Arts pverin@csufresno.edu 559.278.8831

Roadmap

Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology (2012-13)

Year One

Fall

  • GE Area B4-Quantitative Reasoning
  • GE Area A1-Oral Communication
  • GE Area A2-Written Communication
  • Lower Division Major Course
  • GE Area C1-Arts

Spring

  • Lower Division Major Course
  • GE Area A3-Critical Thinking
  • GE Area B1-Physical Science
  • GE Area D1-American History
  • GE Area C1-Arts

Year Two

Fall

  • GE Area B2-Life Sciences
  • GE Area D2-American Government
  • Elective Major Course
  • Elective

Spring

  • GE Area D3-Social Science
  • GE Area E1-Lifelong Understanding
  • GE Area C1-Arts - OR - C2-Humanities
  • Elective Major Course

Year Three

Fall

  • Upper Division Major Course
  • GE Area IC-Arts & Humanities
  • GE Area MI-Multicultural/ International
  • Elective Major Course
  • University Elective:

Spring

  • Upper Division Major Course
  • GE Area IB-Physical Univ & Life Forms
  • Elective Major Course
  • Upper Division Major Course*
  • Additional Elective Major Course

Year Four

Fall

  • GE Area ID-Soc, Pol, Econ Inst & Beh, Hist
  • Upper Division Major Course*
  • Elective Major Course
  • Elective
  • GE Area IC-Arts & Humanities

Spring

  • Upper Division Major Course*
  • Elective Major Course
  • Upper Division Major Course
  • Elective
  • Elective

Careers

careers tab placeholder

Anthropology is concerned with everything that is human, in all parts of the world, both present and past. It is unique among the social sciences in its holistic scope.

The Department of Anthropology provides undergraduate training (major or minor) in anthropology with emphases in Archeology, Cultural and Physical Anthropology. Fieldwork opportunities through the Institute of Public Anthropology and our Archeology field school provide multiple opportunities for students to gain hands on research in ongoing investigations.

What You Can Earn

Employment Opportunities posted on the Society for Applied Anthropology website

Interesting Classes You Might Take

  • Introductory Fieldwork in Archeology
  • World Cultures
  • Anthropology of Health, Illness, and Healing
  • Peoples and Cultures of East Asia

What You Can Learn

  • How culture has made possible the range of different societies
  • Basic methods and strategies for archeological excavation
  • How to think critically and use reasoning when considering topics of race/ingelligence, region/values, and social policy.

About the College

The College of Social Sciences studies the human experience, including the depth of the past and the breadth of the entire planet.

We place emphasis on learning practical skills to aid you in your career. Our students do internships, participate in archaeological digs, or do service-learning projects with a non-profit agency. Students can assist on research projects or organize a social change project.

Whatever a student's major, they enjoy our witty and talented faculty and our caring staff as they discover our social world.

College Contact Information

email
Phone: (559) 278-3013
FAX: (559) 278-7664

Address:
5340 N. Campus Drive MS/SS91
Fresno CA 93740-8019

Department Contact Information

Department of Anthropology
College of Social Sciences
Peters Business Building, Room 385
5245 North Backer Ave. M/S 16
Fresno, CA 93740-8001

Where We're Located

The Department of Anthropology is located on the third floor of the Peters Business Building (room 385).
Drive to Woodrow Avenue from either Barstow or Shaw Avenues. Campus map

Phone: (559) 278-3002 FAX: (559) 278-7234