Search Classes

PH 48. First Responder and Emergency Care

National Safety Council First Responder and Emergency Care course. Priorities of care, injuries, medical emergencies, crisis intervention, and casualty incidents. Includes bleeding, shock, fractures, poisoning, emergency childbirth, CPR Certification for meeting requirements. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PH 49. Emergency Medical Technician Training

Prepares individuals to render pre-hospital basic life support during transport or within a hospital. Upon completion, students will receive a certificate allowing them to take the National Registry test. Upon passing the test, EMT certification is granted.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Spring

PH 90. Contemporary Health Issues

Significance of basic health problems applicable to the young adult and to society. G.E. Breadth E1.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: E1

PH 91. Human Sexuality

Physiological, psychological, social, cultural, and developmental considerations for lifelong understanding related to sexuality. G.E. Breadth E1. (Formerly H S 124)

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: E1

PH 92. Public Health Statistics

Prerequisites: Students must take the ELM exam; students who do not pass the exam must record a grade of C or better in a college-taught intermediate algebra course. Introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics as applied to evaluation and research in allied health. Central tendency and dispersion; central limit theorem; hypothesis testing; ANOVA; correlation, nonparametric methods. Interpretations of public health statistics. (3 lecturer hours)

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PH 100. Community Health

Public health services as they affect the community; investigation and analysis of community health problems.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PH 104. Global and Cultural Issues in Health

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation and Area D; PH 90. Influence of culture on health and disease; relevant health issues of cultural and ethnic groups; alternative healing and holistic health; role of international health organizations; health problems on a world scale. History and evaluation of programs of international health organizations; health problems on a world scale. G.E. Multicultural/International MI.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: M/I

PH 105. Risk Assessment and Analysis

Human and environmental risks as they relate to injuries and illnesses; includes incident causation analysis and assessment. Areas of study encompass occupational safety, consumer products, human factors, environmental health, and human and property costs.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall

PH 109. Epidemiology of Disease

Prerequisite: PH 92 or equivalent. Modern concepts and principles of epidemiology; interaction of all agents, host, and environmental factors of communicable and noncommunicable diseases.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PH 110. Drugs, Society, and Health

Examination of physical, neurological, emotional, social, and political factors affecting the use, misuse, and abuse of licit and illicit substances in contemporary American society. Applies models of addiction and compulsive behaviors to gambling, food consumption, and sexual behavior. G.E. Breadth E1.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: E1

PH 111. Alcohol and Alcoholism

Physical, mental, and social factors related to the consumption of alcoholic beverages; the development of alcohol dependence.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PH 112. Consumer Health

Consumer health as it relates to selection of health care products and services; how to differentiate fact from fiction in health matters.

Units: 3

PH 114. Health Behavior

An introduction to the theory and practice of health behavior change. Covers individual behavior change methodologies and the effects of public and environmental change on individual health.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PH 115. Health Issues of Aging

(PH 115 same as GERON 115.) Basic principles and concepts of the aging process; includes the physical, social, emotional and mental components of health. Benefits of health promotion and preventive action for the aging are also explored.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PH 127. Female Sexuality

(PH 127 same as WS 127.) Studies on female sexuality which include past and present sexual roles, female sexual response patterns, and discussion of common problems encountered by women functioning as sexual beings.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Spring

PH 128S. Holistic Health and Alternative Medicine

Explores concepts related to holistic health and alternative medicine within a cross-cultural framework. Includes a description of the physical and psychosocial effects of alternative healing; addresses the benefits and risks associated with these therapies.

Units: 3
GE Area: M/I

PH 129. Rural Health

Health problems of rural areas including community medical services, medical facilities, federal, state, and local legislation and administrative problems.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Spring

PH 130. Women's Health

(PH 130 same as WS 130.) Examines current crises/ controversies in women's health care. Includes conventional/ alternatives approaches to treatment, management, and prevention with emphasis on self-care and promotion of optimum health.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall

PH 131. Principles of Health Education

Study of the foundations, theories, systems, and principles of health education. Includes an analysis of social, medical, and environmental factors on health-related behaviors.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PH 133. Health Education Methods

It is strongly recommended that students complete PH 114 and PH 131 prior to enrollment in PH 133. Health education program planning, implementation, and evaluation. Provides needs assessment, health education curriculum development, and presenting and evaluating a health education intervention with a client group.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PH 135. Introduction to Human Disease

Concepts and principles of disease and dysfunction of the human body. Detection, diagnosis, treatment, etiology, pathogenesis, and prevention.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PH 141. Applied Ergonomics

Studies the science of ergonomics as it relates to injury/illness prevention and the promotion of a quality work environment. Ergonomics is the evaluation of people and their tools, materials, and equipment in a work setting. (Formerly H S 166T)

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall

PH 143. Occupational and Industrial Safety

Application of safety and accident prevention measures that provide a basis for insight into the hazards of occupational and industrial situations.

Units: 3

PH 145. Occupational Safety and Environmental Health Management

Concepts and principles dealing with the problems, processes, evaluation, and solutions in the development, implementation, and management of an effective environmental health and occupational safety program.

Units: 3

PH 151. Health Law and Legislation

The theory and practice of managing inspection-based enforcement programs in health care and environmental health areas, with emphasis on legislation, procedure, and cases relating to public health.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall

PH 152T. Topics in Health

Analysis and investigation of selected areas in school and community health, public health, and health and safety with some topics including laboratory experiences.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to: 12

PH 154. Health Care Administration

Organizational design and managerial principles as they apply to the private sector of health care.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Spring

PH 155. Utilization of Health Care Resources

Prerequisite: ECON 40. This course provides understanding of how healthcare systems operate in terms of financing and reimbursement using economic rationales. It introduces students to fundamental principles in health economics that serve as the foundation of the US healthcare system. (Formerly PH 152T)

Units: 3

PH 160. Principles of Toxicology

Basic principles and concepts of toxicology with a particular emphasis on the regulation of environmental and industrial toxicants for man/woman.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Spring

PH 161. Environment and Human Health

General principles of environmental health with a particular emphasis on the interaction between man/woman and the environment. Environmental epidemiology, water, wastewater, air, solid waste, ionizing radiation, and noise. Focuses on prevention and control disease and injury caused by chemicals, food protection, air/ water quality radiation, hazardous waste, et cetera.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: IB

PH 162A. Environmental Health Concepts

Prerequisite: PH 161. Basic principles and concepts of environmental health with a particular emphasis on health hazards, communicable disease control, contamination control, food protection, rodent control, managing special environments, planned environments, and environmental health organizations. (Formerly HS 162)

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall

PH 162B. Environmental Health Application

Prerequisites: PH 162A or concurrent. Problems of environmental health studied through field trips, observations, demonstrations, and seminars. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours) (Formerly HS 165)

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Spring

PH 163. Public Health Administration

Principles of public health administration, fundamentals of organization, and administration in public health.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PH 164. Vector Control

Role vectors of disease play in human health. Basic principles and concepts of vector control. Particular emphasis is given to diseases vectored by arthropods and rodents.

Units: 3

PH 166T. Topics in Environmental Health

Analysis and investigation of selected areas in environmental health with some topics including laboratory experiences.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to: 12
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PH 166T. REHS Exam Preparation

To prepare students in taking REHS exam that will allow students to work to improve the quality of life and health through environmental education, consultation, and enforcement. Some areas include food protection, land use, recreational swimming, onsite sewage disposal, drinking water, housing, vector control, disaster sanitation, and solid waste and hazardous materials management.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to: 2

PH 166T. Water Quality and Health

Burgeoning human population and urbanization is creating increased demands on fresh water resources and generating larger and more concentrated waste streams. This course will investigate, discuss, and debate major emerging water quality issues which threaten our water sustainability and the regulatory paradigms to address these challenges and waterborne diseases associated with it.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to: 12

PH 166T. Hazardous Materials Management

Study of principles, applications and regulatory requirements of hazardous materials management. Topics covered inlcude the types, sources, and characteristics of hazardous materials; laws and regulations governing such materials; general management methods and procedures; and hazardous waste minimization strategies.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to: 9

PH 167. Public Health Laboratory Techniques

Designed to provide training in the use of laboratory procedures and techniques of adjusting and operating monitoring equipment used in water quality, air pollution, noise pollution, food sanitation, radiological health, and toxic substances. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours) ( Lab fee, $25)

Units: 3

PH 168A. Occupational Health Concepts

Concepts of occupational health as they pertain to appraising and controlling environmental health hazards; occupational diseases, chemical, biological, and physical agents that produce organic or systemic damage. Problems in toxicology, measurement instruments, and evaluating health hazards. (Formerly HS 168)

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall

PH 168B. Occupational Health Evaluation

Prerequisite: PH 168A. General principles of investigation for chemical and physical hazards commonly encountered in the occupational environment. Sampling strategies, quantitative analysis, combustible gases, organic vapors, and nonionizing radiation. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours) (Formerly HS 147)

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Spring

PH 170. Air Pollution and Health

A descriptive analysis of air pollutants encountered in the indoor and outdoor environments with an emphasis on assessment of risk, human health effects, and a review of federal and state regulations that apply.

Units: 3

PH 175. Environmental Internship

Prerequisites: completion of 21 units of the health science major (Core and Environmental Option courses). Provides practical experience in environmental health. Requires a 3.0 GPA in Health Science coursework, or permission of the instructor. Permission numbers required. CR/NC grading only. (CSU liability insurance fee, $8)

Units: 1-4, Repeatable up to: 6
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PH 182. Computers for the Health Professions

Introduction to the basic use and practical application of personal and mainframe computers in health-related professions. Laboratory use of computers covers word processing, SPSS, data entry, data management, principles of programming, and use of on-line databases. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3

PH 185F. Fieldwork in Health

Repeatable to 3 units in any one area, maximum total 6. Prerequisite: completion of 24 units of the health science major (Core and Administration Option courses). Provides practical experience in a community work setting. Requires a 3.0 GPA in Health Science coursework, or permission of the instructor. Permission numbers required. CR/NC grading only. (CSU liability insurance fee, $8)

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to: 6
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PH 188. Health Education Internship

Prerequisite: completion of 24 units of the health science major (Core and Community Health option courses). Provides practical experiences in a community work setting. Requires a 3.0 GPA in Health Science coursework, or permission of instructor. Permission numbers required. CR/NC grading only. (CSU liability insurance fee, $8)

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to: 6
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PH 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- [-LINK-]. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to: 6
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PH 202. Advanced Public Health Statistics

Prerequisite: PH 92 or equivalent. Theories and limitations of parametric testing: ANOVA, MANOVA, and regression. Focus on nonparametric testing and small samples including Kruskal Wallis, Median and Fischer tests. Preparation of data for computer analysis and interpretation of results. Resource issues related to data collection.

Units: 3

PH 203. Seminar in Community Health Organization

Prerequisite: PH 100. Individual research, analysis, and evaluation in relation to educational aspects of community health programs; group procedures; community organizations; selection, development, and use of media. Field assignments are required. (Formerly HS 203)

Units: 3

PH 206. Environment and Occupational Health

Application and evaluation of environmental health principles to air, land, water, waste, and occupational health with emphasis on contemporary issues.

Units: 3

PH 208. Health Promotion

Focuses on behavioral change techniques derived from many areas of applied research including behavior modification and social interaction theory. Information emphasizes the health relevant principles in each domain and shows how they can be used to understand or change public health problems.

Units: 3

PH 209. Advanced Concepts in Epidemiology

Prerequisites: PH 92, PH 109 or equivalents; computer statistics program competency. Advanced principles and methods of epidemiology. Includes methods of organizing surveillance data, defining cases, testing hypotheses, analyzing effectiveness of methods, summarizing studies. Advanced statistical methods will be utilized with emphasis on interpretation of results.

Units: 3

PH 210. Introduction to Health Policy

Prerequisite: PH 163 or equivalent. In-depth analysis of public health programs and policies with emphasis on skill development in health policy analysis. Group work will be required.

Units: 3

PH 213. Health Planning and Program Evaluation

In-depth analysis of the principles and practices in comprehensive health planning and program evaluation. Field assignments are required. (Formerly H S 213)

Units: 3

PH 223. Health Promotion and Policy Advocacy

Introduction to the fundamentals of the legislative process. Visits to and from local and state officials will be included. Information about the political process related to health promotion and policy will be the major focus of the course. Fieldwork assignments and travel may be required.

Units: 1

PH 225A. Foundation in Health Promotion

Prerequisite: PH 208. History and philosophy of health education. Psychological, sociological, economic, and political theories relevant to the mission and process of health education with special reference to schools and colleges.

Units: 3

PH 225B. Foundation in Health Promotion Part 2

Prerequisite: PH 208 and PH 225A. Application of theories, practices, and technology to health promotion programs.

Units: 3

PH 250. Social Factors in Public Health

Prerequisites: PH 202, PH 209 or equivalent. Advanced principles and methods of social epidemiology. Includes methods of describing how a range of social factors influence health outcomes, utilization and disparities. Expectation is that students will apply epidemiologic methods to study designs for policy analyses and research.

Units: 3

PH 251. Health Care Economics

Prerequisites: ECON 162 or equivalent. Topics include demand and supply in health services sector; implications of public and private financing alternatives; constraints on manpower training and entry; equity and distribution competition and regulation; issues of productivity measurments and utilization; and political economy of health care.

Units: 3

PH 252. Health Policy Development: Analysis and Process

Prerequisite: PH 210. Individual research, analysis and evaluation of health policy issues utilizing skills in evidence-based policy analysis. Special emphasis on assessing the efficacy and effectiveness of health program proposals, understanding the policy development process and developing strategies to influence policy outcomes.

Units: 3

PH 253. Management of Health Services

Prerequisites: PH 210. Focuses on the application of relevant management theory to diverse health care settings, with special emphasis on refining management skills. Course will be taught as a seminar using case methods to illustrate and practice critical management theories and skills.

Units: 3

PH 280. Seminar in Techniques of Health Research

Research methodology, identification of health research problems, use of library resources, data gathering, and processing; writing a research report. (Formerly H S 280)

Units: 3

PH 285. Internship in Public Health

Planning, implementation, participation, and evaluation in selected areas: safety, school health, community health, physical handicaps, occupational health, and environmental health. Approved for RP grading. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 1-4, Repeatable up to: 10

PH 290. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- [-LINK-]. Approved for RP grading. (Formerly H S 290)

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to: 6

PH 298. Project

Prerequisite: advancement to candidacy for MPH degree in Health Science. See [-LINK-]. A significant endeavor in health science that may include an educational booklet, audio visual presentation, evaluation of a health agency, or the development of an experimental device or piece of equipment. A narrative component is required which will follow a formal format adn shall include a written abstract. Approved for RP grading. (Formerly HS 298)

Units: 2-4

PH 298C. Project Continuation

Pre-requisite: Project PH 298. For continuous enrollment while completing the project. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

PH 299. Thesis

Prerequisite: See [-LINK-]. Preparation, completion, and submission of an acceptable thesis for the master's degree. Approved for RP grading. (Formerly H S 299)

Units: 2-4

PH 299C. Thesis Cont

Pre-requisite: Thesis PH 298. For continuous enrollment while completing the thesis. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

PHIL 1. Introduction to Philosophy

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. Introduction to the basic issues, disputes, and methods of traditional and contemporary philosophy, including theory of knowledge, ethics, metaphysics, religion, and social theory. Development of skills in analysis, logical thinking, and self-expression. G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: C2

PHIL 2. Exploring Religious Meaning

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. Introduction to exploration of the many dimensions of religions. Topics include tools and resources of the academic study of religion, the sacred/holy, symbolism, myth, ritual, religious origin, and destiny. G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: C2

PHIL 10. Self, Religion, and Society

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. Conceptions of human nature; nature and varieties of religion; personal and social implications and values of religion. G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: C2

PHIL 20. Moral Questions

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. Introduction to ethics and its place in human experience. Ethical theory; methods of reasoning about values. Typical issues include euthanasia, privacy, work ethics, sex, happiness, capital punishment, censorship, social justice, and environment. Non-Western perspectives; materials from arts and humanities (e.g. literature, film). G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: C2

PHIL 25. Methods of Reasoning

Principles and methods of good reasoning. Typical topics: identification of argument structure, development of skills in deductive and inductive reasoning, assessing observations and testimony reports, language and reasoning, common fallacies. (PHIL 25 and PHIL 45 cannot both be taken for credit.) G.E. Foundation A3.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: A3

PHIL 32H. Life,Death, and Afterlife

Diverse reflections (religious adn philosophical) on the meaning of life, death, and afterlife. The nature of the soul (e.g. immortal/mortal); connection to the body; implications of an afterlife (if any) for this life; includes Western and non-Western perspectives. G. E. Breadth E1

Units: 3
GE Area: E1

PHIL 35H. Logic for Autonomy and Collaboration i the Marketplace of Ideas

Explores techniques for analysis of reasoning in contexts ranging from interpersonal communication through scholarly and political discourses. Theoretical grounding for these techniques, including both central ideas from philosophy of logic and readings from classicaland contemporary sources on freedom of thought, freedom of conscience, and the autonomy of reason. G.E. Foundation A3.

Units: 3
GE Area: A3

PHIL 45. Introduction to Logic

Basic concepts and methods of logic; development of skills in deductive and inductive reasoning, with emphasis on deduction. Elementary formal techniques for propositional logic; categorical logic, fallacies, and language. (PHIL 45 and PHIL 25 cannot both be taken for credit.) G.E. Foundation A3

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: A3

PHIL 101. Ancient Philosophy

Development of Western Philosophy from its beginning; the emergence of critical theory, doctrines, and schools of thought in Greek and Roman culture. Topics considered may include: Presocratic, Sophists, Socrates, and the works of Plato and Aristotle.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PHIL 103. Bacon to Kant

Development of early modern philosophy: the search for new scientific methods -- Bacon, Descartes, Spinoza, Newton, and Locke; empiricism and skepticism -- Berkeley and Hume; rational ist metaphysics -- Leibniz; influences on moral and political thought -the Enlightenment; Rousseau; Kant's critical philosophy.

Units: 3

PHIL 104. Nineteenth Century Philosophy

Principal developments in European and American Philosophy from Kant to James. Figures and movements to include: Hegel, Fichte, Schelling, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Feuerbach, Marx, Engels, Mill, Nietzche, Emerson, Thoreau, Peirce, James, and others; idealism, dialectical materialism, transcendentalism, pragmatism, existentialism, and humanism.

Units: 3

PHIL 105. Twentieth Century Philosophy

Principal developments in philosophy after 1900. Figures and movements include: logical atomism, logical positivism, linguistic analysis, pragmatism, phenomenology, existentialism, G. E. Moore, Russell, Wittgenstein, Whitehead, Dewey, Santayana, Husserl, Heiddegger, Sartre, Austin, Ryle, Strawson, Carnap, and Ayer.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Spring

PHIL 107. Existentialism

Examination of roots of existentialism in Kierkegaard and Nietzsche; study of such 20th century existentialists as Sartre, Heidegger, Jaspers, Buber. Typical problems examined: nature of mind, freedom, the self, ethics, existential psychoanalysis.

Units: 3

PHIL 110. Feminist Philosophy

Introduction to feminist approaches to philosophy and to specifically philosophical approaches to gender. Several philosophical issues will be explored at some depth. These might be drawn from the following areas: personal identity; values and society; political authority; knowledge and reality.

Units: 3

PHIL 111. Philosophy of Race

Philosophical investigation of race, racism, and people of color in philosophy. Typical topics include: concepts of race and racial identities; social/political significance of racial categories; racial justice and redress for racism; ethics of racial discourse; intersections of racism with other oppressions.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall

PHIL 115. Ethical Theory

Introduction to the fundamental concepts and problems of moral theory. Examination of various ethical theories, including relativism, egoism, utilitarianism, intui tionism, and non-cognitivism; the meaning of ethical terms.

Units: 3

PHIL 118. Social and Political Theory

Examination of traditional and contemporary theories of society and government. Analysis of basic concepts such as the common good, social contract, authority, justice, and natural rights.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall

PHIL 120. Contemporary Conflicts of Morals

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area C. Exploration of moral issues through great works, such as philosophy, novels, dramas, or films. Looks at questions such as, "What is it to be moral? Why be moral? Why care about others? How should scarce resources be distributed? What is integrity?" G.E. Integration IC.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: IC

PHIL 121. Ethics in Criminal Justice

Philosophical issues concerning society's treatment of criminal behavior. Topics discussed include: morality and law; punishment or rehabilitation; safe vs. repressive society, and what types of deviant behavior should be regarded as criminal?

Units: 3

PHIL 122. Introduction to Professional Ethics

Survey of ethical issues and standards facing a range of professionals in their careers, including engineering, law, medicine, the media, science, agriculture, education, and business. Introduction to basic ethical theories and methods of reasoning about moral dilemmas.

Units: 3

PHIL 123. Bioethics

Pre-requisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area B2 and either PHIL 20 or PHIL 120 or instructor consent. Not open to Freshmen. Survey of ethical issues within the biomedical sciences. Typical issues include research ethics, informed consent, genetics, stem cell research, non-Western perspectives, ethical and legal regulations. (Formerly PHIL 165T)

Units: 3

PHIL 125. Issues in Political Philosophy

Examination of prominent political philosophies and contemporary issues of politics and public policy. Policy issues may include the scope and limits of government authority, the role of government in the economy, foreign policy, health care, education, agriculture, and the environment.

Units: 3

PHIL 127. Philosophy of Law

Nature and functions of law; methods of justifying legal systems; logic of legal reasoning; analysis of fundamental legal concepts.

Units: 3

PHIL 130. Philosophy of Religion

The nature and function of religious faith, belief, and practice; relations between religion and morals; existence of God; problem of evil; nature and significance of religious experience.

Units: 3

PHIL 131. Comparative Religion

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. A study of major religions of the world, their traditions, teachings, influential texts, methodological and comparative approaches. Emphasis on major Western and non-Western religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. G.E. Multicultural/ International MI.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: M/I

PHIL 132. Religion and the Margin

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Exploration of elements facing religious studies that have been historically moved from the center to the side (marginalized), such as women's experience, ethnicity, gender, and class. Focus will include how religion has both supported and resisted this move. G.E. Multicultural/International MI.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: M/I

PHIL 132Z. Religion and the Margin-London Semester

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Exploration of elements facing religious studies that have been historically moved from the center to the side (marginalized), such as women's experience, ethnicity, gender, and class. Focus will include how religion has both supported and resisted this move. G.E. Multicultural/International MI.

Units: 3

PHIL 133W. Literature of the New Testament

(ENGL 115W same as PHIL 133W.) Prerequisite: satifactory completion (C or better) of the ENGL 5B or ENGL 10 graduation requirement. Discussion and close written analyses of selected texts from the New Testament. Meets upper-division writing skills requirement for graduation.

Units: 3

PHIL 134. Literature of the Old Testament

(ENGL 116 same as PHIL 134.) Discussion and written analyses of selected texts from the Hebrew Bible. Special attention to the sources and styles of biblical literarcy techniques.

Units: 4

PHIL 135. Asian Religious Traditions

A study of the major beliefs and values of the Asian religious traditions, including an examination of some of the classical texts central to Asian religions.

Units: 3

PHIL 136. Buddhism

Introduction to Buddhism. Life and teachings of Gautama Siddhartha Buddha; development of Buddhism after death or mahanirvana of the Buddha.

Units: 3

PHIL 137. Hinduism

Introduction to the development and ideas of Hinduism, including an examination of classical scriptural texts, e.g., Upanishads, Bhagavad-gita, as well as modern Hindu writings.

Units: 3

PHIL 138. Chinese Thought

Introduction to the development of major ideas and systems of thought in China; emphasis on Confucian, Taoist, and Chinese Buddhist traditions.

Units: 3

PHIL 139. Islam

Introduction to Isalm, including the Qur'an, life of Muhammad, sectarianism, leadership, Islamic Law, science, calligraphy, Ramadan, and Hajj.

Units: 3

PHIL 140. Advanced Reasoning Skills

Development of skills in the analysis of arguments, thinking clearly, and reasoning well. Emphasis on problems and skills involving language (e.g., clarifying meaning, handling vagueness, handling verbal component of disputes), and on inductive inferences in everyday life.

Units: 3

PHIL 145. Symbolic Logic

(Similar to MATH 110; consult department.) Prerequisite: PHIL 25 or PHIL 45 or permission of instructor. Theory of deductive inference; includes propositional logic, predicate logic, relations, identity, definite description, nature of axiom systems.

Units: 3

PHIL 146. Philosophy of Language

Nature and uses of language; theories of meaning; concepts of reference, predication, truth, name, ambiguity, vagueness, definition, metaphor; relationships between methodology in philosophy and theories of language.

Units: 3

PHIL 150. Foundations of Knowledge

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area C. Nature, sources, and limits of human knowledge; roles of perception, reason, testimony, and intuition in acquiring rational beliefs; e.g. science, mathematics, values, the arts, religion, social issues, and psychological states. G.E. Integration IC.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: IC

PHIL 151. Cognitive Science: Mind

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area C. The interdisciplinary study of cognition and mind: cognition includes mental states and processes such as thinking, reasoning, remembering, language understanding and generation, visual perception, learning, consciousness, emotions, self-awareness, and our place in the world. G.E. Integration IC.

Units: 3
GE Area: IC

PHIL 152. Philosophy of Science

The nature of scientific inquires as outcomes and/or practices. Theories of explanation, confirmation, induction, and discovery; (anti-)realism, instrumentalism, and social constructivism; nature of scientific theories, models, and laws of nature; scientific changes and revolutions; philosophical problems in particular sciences.

Units: 3

PHIL 155. Metaphysics

Analysis of classic and contemporary problems of metaphysics: the nature of the mind-independent world; the reality of abstract objects and types; the nature of time and causality; realism and anti-realism; essentialism, modality and possible worlds; naturalism and emergent properties.

Units: 3

PHIL 156. Moral Psychology

Analysis of mind and morality: philosophical perspectives on cognitive and affective aspects of virtuous and non-virtuous dispositions and behaviors. Topics may include agency, motivation, intention, desire, deliberation, practical judgment, self-control, weakness of will, akrasia, compulsion, self-deception, self-knowledge, regret, blame.

Units: 3

PHIL 157. Freedom, Fate, and Choice

Nature of human action, free will and determinism, free will and moral responsibility; analysis of basic concepts; for example, will, action, freedom, determinism, fatalism, chance, choice, decision, intention, reason, desire, belief; implications for everyday life.

Units: 3

PHIL 158. Judaism

Introduction to Judaism, including Torah, Jerusalem, Mishnah, Talmud, midrash, synagogue, Orthodox, Reform, Halakha, Passover, Shabbat, Yom Kippur, anti-Semitism, and Holocaust.

Units: 3

PHIL 165T. Special Topics

Topics of current or interdisciplinary interest or requiring special background.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to: 9

PHIL 170T. Senior Seminar

Prerequisites: senior standing or permission of instructor and at least one upper-division philosophy course. Intensive investigation of selected problems, major figures, or a historical period in philosophy. Extensive writing and supervised research.

Units: 1-4, Repeatable up to: 12

PHIL 170T. Peace and War

A critical examination of peace-building, pacifism, just war theory, and moral questions regarding violence and nonviolence. Will focus on traditional philosophical and religious sources as well as recent scholarship.

Units: 3

PHIL 172T. Seminar in Religious Issues

Prerequisite: one upper-division philosophy course. Intensive investigation of problems in philo sophical theology, comparative religion, and culture. Extensive writing and supervised research.

Units: 1-4, Repeatable up to: 12

PHIL 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to: 6
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PHIL 192. Directed Reading

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Supervised readings in a selected philosopher or field of philosophy. Combined units of PHIL 190 and PHIL 192 may not exceed 6 units.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to: 6

PHIL 198. Applied Ethics Internship

Prerequisite: junior standing, PHIL 120, PHIL 122, or applied ethics courses and permission of instructor. Workstudy experience in community service, with a focus on ethical analysis and understanding. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 3

PHIL 199. Fieldwork in Philosophy and Law

Prerequisites: senior standing, permission of instructor. Practical community work-study experience in legal or paralegal setting. Student works under sponsorship of a law firm or law-related agency, meets periodically with instructor, and submits a written report on relevant issues in ethics, jurisprudence, or philosohpy.

Units: 3

PHTH 105. Medical Terminology for Health Professionals

Study of word parts, definitions, spelling, analysis, synthesis, and use of medical vocabulary. This course is taught in classroom sections or may be taken entirely on-line.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PHTH 180T. Topics in Physical Therapy

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Advanced techniques in physical therapy and new trends relating to the care of patients.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to: 12

PHTH 240. Advances in Orthopedic Physical Therapy I

Prerequisite: PHTH 217, PHTH 218 or permission of instructor. Exploration of treatment of orthopedic problems.

Units: 2

PHTH 241. Advances in Physical Therapy II

Prerequisite: PHTH 217, PHTH 218 or permission of instructor. A continuation of Advances in Orthopedic Physical Therapy I.

Units: 2

PHTH 242. Advanced Clinical Anatomy I

Prerequisite: Exploration of clinical application of anatomical structures of joints.

Units: 2

PHTH 243. Advanced Clinical Anatomy II

Prerequisites: PHTH 242 or permission of instructor. A continuation of Advanced Clinical Anatomy I

Units: 2

PHTH 244. Advances in Management of the Aging Population

Exploration of special approaches and considerations of intervention of conditions of aging.

Units: 2

PHTH 245. Advances in Management of the Neurological Patient

Prerequisite: PHTH 227, PHTH 228 or permission of instructor. Exploration of advanced multisystem treatment approaches in neuro-rehabilitation.

Units: 2

PHTH 247. Sports Injuries

Exploration in advances in management of sports injuries.

Units: 2

PHTH 248. Advances in Cardiac Rehabilitation

Prerequisite: PHTH 236 or permission of instructor. Exploration of the components of implementing and maintaining multilevels of cardiac rehabilitation and the management of patients with cardiac disease.

Units: 2

PHTH 249. Contemporary Issues in Delivery of Physical Therapy Services

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Exploration of emerging trends and issues in contemporary physical therapy practice.

Units: 2

PHTH 260. Administration of Physical Therapy Services

Application of administration and organization of a physical therapy service, including supervision issues, fiscal considerations, marketing and public relations, outcomes management, utilization and quality management.

Units: 2

PHTH 262. Cooperative Education in Physical Therapy

PHTH 262 gives students enrolled in the third semester or later in the Doctor of Physical Therapy program the opportunity to combine classroom theory with "on-the-job training" to work under the supervision of a licensed Physical Therapist. The student performs patient care skills commensurate with their academic preparation.

Units: 1-2, Repeatable up to: 6

PHTH 290. Independent Study

Supervised guidance for students who wish to do additional research. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-6

PHTH 297. Evidence Based Practice in Physical Therapy

This course will prepare students to apply the principles of evidence based practice to clinical decision making.

Units: 3

PHTH 506. Motor Development through the Lifespan

Motor development is a lecture course. This course human motor development, integrating physiological, psychological, sociological and spiritual domains while emphasizing the interaction between the systems. This course is in preparation for PHTh 537 Physical Therapy Management in Pediatrics.

Units: 2

PHTH 507. Foundations of Patient Assessment and Clinical Management in Physical Therapy I

This course involves selected theory and clinical application of essential evaluation, treatment procedures and interventions utilized in physical therapy practice including examination procedures, physical agents, massage, therapeutic exercise, and transfer and mobility training.

Units: 4

PHTH 508. Foundations of Patient Assessment and Clinical Management in Physical Therapy II

This course involves selected theory and clinical application of essential evaluation, treatment procedures and interventions utilized in physical therapy practice including examination procedures, physical agents, massage, therapeutic exercise, and transfer and mobility training.

Units: 4

PHTH 509. Clinical Pathokinesiology

This course focuses on management of musculoskeletal impairments involving complex, multisystems in persons across the life span. Emphasis is on developing clinical reasoning, critical thinking, and decision-making applied to various patient populations with impairments and functional limitations.

Units: 3

PHTH 510. Anatomy of the Appendicular Skeleton

Units: 3

PHTH 511. Anatomy of the Axial Skeleton

This course is an advanced study of the structure and function of the human body as a basis for understanding normal human movement. This course will emphasize the trunk and spine. (Instructional materials fee, $35).

Units: 4

PHTH 512. Applied Pathophysiology for Physical Therapists

This course involves an advanced study of physiology of body systems and the responses to normal aging, environmental influences, and pathological dysfunction. Includes cardiovascular, pulmonary, endocrine, neurological, musculoskeletal, and integumentary systems.

Units: 3

PHTH 517. Orthopedic Management in Physical Therapy I

Analysis of musculoskeletal disabilities with emphasis on physical assessment, methods of therapeutic intervention, clinical decision making and program planning. Selected lectures by medical practitioners on medical-surgical management of orthopedic conditions. Focus will be towards dysfunction involving the extremities.

Units: 4

PHTH 518. Orthopedic Management in Physical Therapy II

This course is an analysis of musculoskeletal disabilities with emphasis on physical assessment, methods of therapeutic intervention, clinical decision making and program planning towards dysfunction involving the spine and pelvic girdle. (2 hour lecture; 6 hour lab)

Units: 4

PHTH 526. Electrophysiologic Approaches to Patient Care

Exploration of advanced theories and principles related to the clinical use of electrophysiologic modalities. Includes electroneuromuscular stimulation for motor performance, nerve function, pain management and tissue repair.

Units: 3

PHTH 527. Applied Neurosciences

An advanced study of normal structure and function of the peripheral and central nervous system as a basis for understanding clinical manifestations seen in neurological disorders. This course is in preparation for evaluating and treating patients with neurological disorders. (2 hr lecture; 6 hr lab)

Units: 4

PHTH 528. Management of Neurological Disorders in Physical Therapy I

Advanced evaluation and treatment approaches to neurological disabilities in adults with emphasis on therapeutic intervention, program planning, and outcome measurements for the patient with neurological problems such as balance disorders, stroke, and Parkinson's disease.

Units: 3

PHTH 529. Management of Neurological Disorders in Physical Therapy II

Advanced evaluation and treatment approaches to neurological disabilities in adults with emphasis on therapeutic intervention, program planning, and outcome measurements for the patient with neurological problems such as spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, and traumatic head injury.

Units: 3

PHTH 533. Functional Kinesiology for Physical Therapists

This course presents basic principles, theories and applications of biomechanics. Kinesiology and pathokinesiology of the extremities, thorax, vertebral column, and temporomandibular joint will be discussed.

Units: 3

PHTH 534. Gait and Movement

This course presents a study of normal and abnormal gait, the principles of ergonomics, biomechanics of posture, and functional capacity evaluations.

Units: 3

PHTH 535. Exercise Physiology for Physical Therapists

Provides theoretical basis for understanding the body's physiological responses to exercise. Investigates how the support systems of the body (respiratory, cardiovascular, neuromuscular, metabolic, and hormonal) function, in cooperation with human energy production to insure that energy is provided for exercise.

Units: 2

PHTH 536. Physical Therapy Management of Body Systems

Evaluation and therapeutic intervention in the clinical management of normal and pathological conditions of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, endocrine and integumentary systems. A focus on the development of advanced knowledge and skills in patient evaluation, program planning and treatment procedures.

Units: 3

PHTH 537. Physical Therapy Management in Pediatrics

Advanced study of diagnosis and physical therapy problems found in pediatrics. Evaluation and intervention principles are used ot discuss and explore clinical manifestations associated with diseases and functional impairments. Emphasis will be placed on the therapeutic intervention and program planning. (CSU liability insurance fee, $8)

Units: 3

PHTH 538. Physical Therapy Management in Geriatrics

A synthesis of biology of aging with common orthopedic and neurological problems special to the older patient. This course emphasizes analysis of clinical problems and issues facing the physical therapist in utilizing functional testing and community resources with the elderly.

Units: 2

PHTH 539. Physical Diagnosis

This course presents functional profiles of clients with emphasis on signs and symptoms associated with musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary, peripheral vascular and neurologic diagnosis. Emphasis on methods to determine the most appropriate intervention strategy for each patient or client through the diagnosis process.

Units: 3

PHTH 554. Clinical Learning I

Uses an experiential model for clinical decisions and reflection. The course requires students to consider appropriate tests, assessments, and interventions by examining and providing treatments for clients through participation in the Department & Health Center sponsored Musculoskeletal Care Clinic (MSC).

Units: 2

PHTH 555. Clinical Learning II

Uses Gait, Balance, and Mobility Center as an experiential model for clinical decision analysis. With faculty supervision students are responsible for evaluation and treatment of clients. Students communicate their assessment findings and intervention through documentation.

Units: 2

PHTH 556. Clinical Learning III

Designed as a continuation from PHTH 554, this course is designed to progress the development of student clinical competencies needed in the outpatient orthopedic setting.

Units: 2

PHTH 557. Clinical Experience I

This 9 week externship during summer allows the student to apply academic knolwedge in a clinical setting. Comprehensive examination, evaluation, and intervention will be used to manage the physical therapy patient. CR/NC grading only. (CSU liability insurance fee, $8)

Units: 4

PHTH 558. Clinical Experience II

This 12 week externship during the summer allows the student to apply academic knowledge related to examination, evaluation, and intervention will be used to manage the physical therapy patient. CR/NC grading only. (CSU liability insurance fee, $8)

Units: 6

PHTH 559. Clinical Experience III

This final 9 week externship during spring semester allows the student to apply academic knowledge in a clinical setting. Upon completion the student must demonstrate mastery of physical therapy skills considered appropriate for entry level practice. CR/NC grading only. (CSU liability insurance fee, $8)

Units: 4

PHTH 560. Administration of Physical Therapy Services

Application of administration and organization of a physical therapy service, including supervision issues, fiscal considerations, marketing and public relations, outcomes management, utilization and quality management.

Units: 2

PHTH 561. Pharmacology for Physical Therapists

Students will develop skills required for the physical therapist to understand and utilize important elements or pharmacological mechanisms and drug interactions that are essential for clinical decision making in physical therapy practice.

Units: 2

PHTH 563. Radiology for Physical Therapists

Students will develop skills required for the physical therapist to understand and utilize radiological diagnosis and diagnostic imaging procedures, as needed for clinical decision making in physical therapy practice.

Units: 2

PHTH 564. Prosthetics

This course provides the student with didactic knowledge and clinical skills necessary to successfully provide physical therapy evaluation and management of the patient following extremity amputation, with an emphasis on lower extremity.

Units: 1

PHTH 565S. Community Outreach Wellness

This is a Service learning course that presents essential concepts related to the roles of physical therapists in prevention and in the promotion of health, wellness, and fitness. This course includes application of concepts through service learning in selected community agencies.

Units: 1

PHTH 591. Research Methods

Study and application of research design and critical research reading skills. The student will gain important insights into the research process and become a discriminating consumer of published research.

Units: 3

PHTH 592. Clinical Teaching and Mentoring

This course is a lecture/seminar course. This course will prepare students to integrate their role as educators in many areas of practice including patient education, clinical instruction, mentoring as a community/public educator using educational theory that affects learning.

Units: 1

PHTH 593. Professional Colloquium I

This course addresses professional behavior standards in relation to patient care interactions and relationships with colleagues and community including documentation and professional service learning.

Units: 2

PHTH 594. Professional Colloquium II

Presents topics relative to global healthcare delivery models focusing on the healthcare system in the United States. It reviews community health services, prevention, health policy, reimbursement, referral, and legal issues related to profession.

Units: 2

PHTH 595. Case Based Learning

Seminar course with case based problem solving and clinical decision making discussions in a Grand Round format.

Units: 2

PHTH 596. Case Reports

This course involves development of case reporting skills, with a presentation of unique case study that includes a review of the literature on fiagnosis and treatment of the case. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 3

PHTH 597. Evidence Based Practice in Physical Therapy

This course will prepare students to apply the principles of evidence based practice to clinical decision making.

Units: 3

PHTH 598. Doctoral Project

A doctoral project appropriate to the profession of physical therapy that demonstrates critical inquiry, independent thinking, and rationale is required. An abstract, written manuscript and oral defense will be required. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 3

PHTH 598C. Project Continuation

Pre-requisite: Project PHTH 298. For continuous enrollment while completing the project. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

PHYS 2A. General Physics

Prerequisites: MATH 6 or DS 71 or MATH 75 or MATH 75A or MATH 70 (or permission to register from department office). Topics and concepts in Newtonian mechanics of point particles and rigid bodies, energy, properties of fluids, heat and thermodynamics, waves and sound. G.E. Breadth B1. (3 lecture, 3 lab hours)

Units: 4
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
GE Area: B1

PHYS 2B. General Physics

Prerequisite: PHYS 2A with a grade C or better. Topics and concepts in light, electricity, magnetism, atomic structure, relativity, quantum nature of light and matter, nuclear structure and radiation. (3 lecture, 3 lab hours)

Units: 4
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PHYS 4A. Mechanics and Wave Motion

Prerequisite: G.E. Breadth B4 with a grade of C or better; Math 75 or Math 75A and Math 75B; MATH 76 with a C grade or better. MATH 76 may be taken concurrently Topics in classical Newtonian mechanics including linear and circular motion; energy; linear and angular momentum; systems of particles; rigid body motion; fluids; gravity; wave motion and sound. G.E. Breadth B1 when taken with PHYS 4AL.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: B1

PHYS 4AL. Laboratory in Mechanics and Wave Motion

Corequisite: PHYS 4A. Introduction to laboratory methods. Experiments in mechanics, waves, and sound. G.E. Breadth B1. (3 lab hours)

Units: 1
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: B1

PHYS 4B. Electricity, Magnetism, and Heat

Prerequisites: PHYS 4A with a grade of C or better; MATH 77 with a C grade or better (may be taken concurrently). Topics in classical physics including heat and thermodynamics, electrostatics, electric fields and potential, currents and AC and DC electric circuits, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PHYS 4BL. Laboratory in Electricity, Magnetism, and Heat

Corequisite: PHYS 4B. Experiments in electricity, magnetism, heat, and thermodynamics. (3 lab hours)

Units: 1
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PHYS 4C. Light and Modern Physics

Prerequisites: PHYS 4B with a grade of C or better, MATH 77 with a grade of C or better. Maxwell's Equations, geometrical optics; electromagnetic radiation; physical optics; introduction to special relativity; quantum physics; and the physics of atoms, nuclei, and the solid state.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PHYS 10. Conceptual Physics

Prerequisite:G.E. Foundation B4 (except for those with declared majors in the College of Science and Mathematics.) Basic ideas of physics and their relationship to the everyday environment. Physical phenomena, misconceptions, terminology, scientific method, and metric system. Memorable demonstrations in lectures; household-related experiments in the lab. G.E. Breadth B1. (3 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 4
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: B1

PHYS 90. Directed Study

Prerequisite: any university-level physics or physical science course. Individually arranged course of study in some limited area of physics, either to remove a deficiency or to in vestigate in more depth. (1-2 hours to be arranged)

Units: 1-2, Repeatable up to: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PHYS 100. Concepts of Quantum Physics

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area B. Key discoveries in Quantum physics and conceptual development of quantum theory. Lecture demonstration of experiments, graphical visualization of theory, hi-tech applications. G.E. Integration IB (3 lecture hours)

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: IB

PHYS 102. Modern Physics

Prerequisite: PHYS 4C; MATH 81 (may be taken concurrently). Fundamental concepts of atomic and nuclear structure, transitions and radiation. Includes discussions of relativistic mechanics, quantum mechanics, solid state physics. Special topics as they pertain to modern developments in physic, engineering, and chemistry.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall

PHYS 104. Experimental Techniques in Condensed Matter Physics

Prerequisites: PHYS 4C. Shop techniques and safety instructions. Basic concepts in condensed matter physics. Measurements of conductivity, energy gap in semiconductors, drift mobility, Hall coefficients, photoconductivity, magnetic susceptibilities, excition spectra, dieletric loss. Experience in X-ray diffraction, vacuum technology, thin-film deposition, and low temperature techniques. (1 lecture, 9 lab hours)

Units: 4
Typically Offered: Spring

PHYS 105A. Analytical Mechanics

Prerequisite: PHYS 4C: MATH 81 (may be taken concurrently). (A) Analytical and vector treatment of the fundamental principles of statics, kinematics, and dynamics. Prerequisite: PHYS 105A. (B) Advanced dynamics; harmonic motion, central force fields, and Lagrange's equations.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall

PHYS 105B. Analytical Mechanics

Prerequisite: PHYS 105A. (B) Advanced dynamics; harmonic motion, central force fields, and Lagrange's equations.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Spring

PHYS 107A. Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism

Prerequisites: PHYS 105A, MATH 81. (A) Mathematical analysis of electrostatics and magnetostatics, Gauss'law, solutions of Laplace's equation, images, theory of conduction, magnetic potentials. (B) Prerequisites: PHYS 107A. Motion of ions in electric and magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, Maxwell's equations and wave propagation, electron theory, and magnetic properties.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall

PHYS 107B. Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism

Prerequisites: PHYS 107A. Motion of ions in electric and magnetic fields, electgromagnetic induction, Maxwell's equations and wave propagation, electron theory, and magnetic properties.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Spring

PHYS 110. Physical Optics

Prerequisites: PHYS 4C, MATH 81. Theory of optical phenomena; wave theory of light with applications to optical instruments; interference and diffraction phenomena, dispersion, polarization, coherence, and laser phenomena. Practical experience in using lasers and optical instruments. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours)

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall

PHYS 115. Quantum Mechanics

Prerequisites: PHYS 102, PHYS 105A, MATH 81. PHYS 170A strongly recommended. Historical background, postulates, meaning, and methods of quantum mechanics; applications to atomic phenomena.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Spring

PHYS 135. Introduction to Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy

Prequisites: PHYS 4A, PHYS 4AL, PHYS 4B, PHYS 4BL and PHYS 4C. Introduction to fundamentals of nuclear magnetic resonance and application in imaging and spectroscopy in-vivo. T1, T2, PD-weighted images, spin echo sequence, artifacts in images, and clinical applications of cerebral metabolites in 1D neurospectroscopy. Lab at VACCHCS. (3 lecture hours, 3 lab hours).

Units: 4
Typically Offered: Fall

PHYS 136. Radiation Physics

Prerequisite: PHYS 102. The interaction of radiation with matter: photoelectric, Compton and pair production processes, neutron and charged particle interactions, linear energy transfer, quality factor, attenuation coefficients, shielding. Biological effects, RBE, internal dose, permissible exposures, beneficial application. Instrumentation.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall

PHYS 137. Radiation Measurements Laboratory

Prerequisite: PHYS 136. Advanced experiments in atomic and nuclear physics. Radiation safety. Gamma ray, X-ray, and particle detection and spectroscopy. Application of Gas-filled detectors, Scintillators and High Purity Germanium Detectors. Statistics and error analysis. (1 lecture, 4 lab hours). Formerly PHYS 130.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Spring

PHYS 140. Thermodynamics and Kinetic Theory

Prerequisite: PHYS 102, MATH 81. Fundamental concepts and laws of classical thermodynamics. Rudiments of kinetic theory and statistical thermodynamics with application to physical and chemical systems.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall

PHYS 150. Astrophysics

Prerequisites: PHYS 4C. Introduction to celestial mechanics, spectral classification, stellar atmospheres and interiors, star formation and evolution, variable stars, neutron stars, pulsars, black holes, the nature of galaxies, and the expansion of the universe.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Spring

PHYS 151. Observational Astronomy

Prerequisites: PHYS 4C. Celestial coordinates, time, stellar motions, constellations, star charts, catalogs, astronomical sources, observational limits, telescopes, detectors, atmospheric effects, digital image processing, photometry, and spectroscopy. (3 lecture, 3 lab hours). (Formerly PHYS 175T)

Units: 4
Typically Offered: Fall

PHYS 155. Seminar in Biomedical Physics/Neurosciences

Prerequisite: Biomedical Physics Major or permission of the Department Chair. One-to-one interaction with invited speakers giving talks onthe state-of-the-art in medical imaging including MR, CT, PET, SPECT, etc, new radiation oncology systems such as CYBERKNIFE, IMRT, etc, neurobiology, radiobiology, and molecular imaging.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to: 2

PHYS 156. Diagnostic X-Ray Imaging Physics

Pre-requisite: PHYS 136. The fundamentals of x-ray production, image quality, digital radiography, fluoroscopy, and computed tomography. Image artifacts. Quality assurance or equipment and radiation dose. Lab at the VACCHCS. (3 lecture hours, 3 lab hours)

Units: 4

PHYS 157. Nuclear Medicine Physics

Prerequisite: PHYS 136. Fundamentals of nuclear imaging. Gamma camera, basic principles and performance characteristics. Emission tomography: SPECT and PET, basic principles and performance characteristics. Clinical applications. Lab at the VACCHCS. (3 lecture hours, 3 lab hours).

Units: 4

PHYS 158. Radiation Oncology Physics

Prerequisite: PHYS 136. Introduction to linear accelerators, geometry of photon beams, photon beam and electron beam dosimetry, treatment planning, brachytherapy, clinical applications, and new techniques. (3 lecture hours).

Units: 3

PHYS 162. Condensed Matter Physics

Prerequisites: PHYS 102, or CHEM 110B and permission of instructor. Classification of solids; crystalline state and lattice vibrations; properties of metallic lattices and dielectrics; magnetic properties of solids; free electron theory and band theory of metals; semiconductors; imperfections.

Units: 3

PHYS 163. Introduction to Particle Physics and ATLAS Experiment of LHC at CERN

Prerequisites: PHYS 4A and PHYS 4B. PHYS 4C is strongly recommended. Online course to 17 CSU Nuclear and Particle Physics Consortium (NUPAC) campuses, especially those intended to work at CERN on ATLAS research during summer (Formerly PHYS 175T).

Units: 3, Repeatable up to: 12
Typically Offered: Fall

PHYS 168S. Physics Outreach

Prerequisite: Any one of the following courses: NSCI 1A, PHYS 10, PHYS 2A, PHYS 4A. Provides science majors and future teachers hands-on experience demonstrating physics in K-12 schools. Best practices based on education research, theories of science instruction, and core concepts in physics in a service-learning environment. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours) FS

Units: 3

PHYS 170A. Mathematical Physics

Prerequisite: PHYS 4A and MATH 81. Application of mathematical methods to the solution of problems in physics.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Spring

PHYS 171. Analytical Methods

Prerequisite: PHYS 102, PHYS 110, PHYS 105A, PHYS 105B, PHYS 107A, PHYS 115, PHYS 140 (PHYS 105B and PHYS 115 may be taken concurrently). Advanced analytical techniques in solving problems in core physics disciplines

Units: 2

PHYS 175T. Topics in Contemporary Physics

Designed to provide students with special work in such areas of physics as biophysics, modern optics, plasmas, high energy physics, solid state, chaos theory, nuclear structure, astrophysics, low temperature phenomena. Some topics may have labs.

Units: 1-4, Repeatable up to: 12

PHYS 175T. Tools/Skills for Working at CERN on ATLAS Research

Prerequisite: PHYS 163. This online class is designed to teach the students the tools and skills for working on ATLAS research projects at the LHC of CERN. It is only for the selected students from CSU Nuclear and Particle Physics Consortium (NUPAC) to work at CERN on ATLAS research projects for incoming summer.

Units: 3

PHYS 175T. Introduction to Medical Imaging

Introduction to Medical Imaging for Nurses, Physical Therapists and other Professionals in the Healt This course will cover an overview of multiple modalities in medical imaging such as x-rays, nuclear medecine. fluoroscopy, CT, MRI, etc.

Units: 3

PHYS 180. Seminar in Physics

Prerequisite: senior or graduate physics major or permission of department chair.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PHYS 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to: 6
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

PHYS 203. Classical Mechanics

Prerequisites: PHYS 105B, PHYS 170A. Advanced treatment of classical analytical mechanics including Lagrange's and Hamilton's formulation of the laws of motion, special relativity, small oscillation theory, hydrodynamics.

Units: 4

PHYS 220A. Advanced Electricity and Magnetism

Prerequisites: PHYS 107B, PHYS 170A. Electromagnetic theory and its applications; electrostatics, boundary-value problems in electrostatics, dielectrics, multipoles, magnetostatics, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic radiation, optical properties of materials, wave guides and resonant cavities.

Units: 3

PHYS 220B. Advanced Electricity and Magnetism

Prerequisites: PHYS 107B, PHYS 170A. Electromagnetic theory and its applications; electrostatics, boundary-value problems in electrostatics, dielectrics, multipoles, magnetostatics, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic radiation, optical properties of materials, wave guides and resonant cavities.

Units: 3

PHYS 222A. Quantum Mechanics I

Prerequisite: PHYS 115, PHYS 170A. Quantum Dynamics: representations and pictures, path integrals, evolution operator, propagators. Angular Momentum: orbital and spin, addition. Perturbation Theory: time-independent and time-dependent problems, sudden and adiabatic approximations. Scattering: Lippman-Schwinger equations, scattering matrix, Born approximation, partial waves.

Units: 3

PHYS 222B. Quantum Mechanics II

Prerequisite: PHYS 222A. Identical Particles: fermions and bosons, second quantization. Electromagnetic Fields: radiation field, photons, coherent states, vacuum state and Casimir effect, interactions with charged particles. Relativistic Quantum Mechanics: Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations, relativistic hydrogen atom, perturbation theory and Feynman diagrams.

Units: 3

PHYS 262. Advanced Condensed Matter Physics

Prerequisites: PHYS 115, PHYS 162, PHYS 170A. Binding and crystal structure, crystal electron theories, elementary excitations, transport theories, crystal defects, superconductivity.

Units: 3

PHYS 270. Advanced Mathematical Physics

Prerequisite: PHYS 170A. Group theory, including continuous (Lie) groups, Lie algebras, and an introduction to the theory of representations, Green's functions and their applications to physical problems, and integral equations including diagrammatic methods of solution.

Units: 3

PHYS 272. General Relativity

Prerequisite: PHYS 203. The principle of equivalence, tensor calculus in curved space-times, the Einstein-Hilbert equations, the Schwarzschild solution, tests of general relativity, gravitational radiation, introduction to cosmology.

Units: 3

PHYS 275T. Topics in Contemporary Physics

Advanced topics in such areas as modern optics, plasma physics, high energy physics, astrophysics, nuclear physics, biophysics. Some topics may have labs.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to: 6

PHYS 290. Independent Study

See Academic Placement. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to: 6

PHYS 298. Project

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Scholarly investigation by the advanced graduate student as a culminating experience for the master's degree, including a written project report and an oral defense, and followed by a competency exam. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 2-6

PHYS 298C. Project Continuation

Pre-requisite: Project PHYS 298. For continuous enrollment while completing the project. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

PHYS 299. Thesis

Prerequisite: See. Preparation, completion, and submission of an acceptable thesis for the master's degree. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 2-6

PHYS 299C. Thesis Continuation

Pre-requisite: Thesis PHYS 299. For continuous enrollment while completing the thesis. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0