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ANTH 2. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Examines the nature of culture, humanity's unique mechanism for adapting to the changing environment. Explores the varieties of human life and explains how culture has made possible the range of different and successful societies, from hunters and gatherers to industrial civilization. G.E. Breadth D3.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: D3

ANTH 3. Introduction to Prehistory and Physical Anthropology

Examines the biological and cultural basis of being human. Compares us with our primate relatives, traces the biological and cultural evolution of our species from earliest ancestors, through the development of agriculture to the emergence of civilization. G.E. Breadth D3.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: D3

ANTH 30. Critical Thinking in Anthropology

Distinguish belief vs. knowledge and fact vs. opinion; examine relationship between language/logic; use inductive/deductive reasoning; recognize informal/formal fallacies; appreciate socio-cultural context of critical thinking. These skills are applied to topics of race/intelligence, religion/values, and social policy. Skills demonstrated/assessed through oral and written performance. G.E. Foundation A3.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
GE Area: A3

ANTH 100. Concepts and Applications

This foundation course demonstrates the use of selected core concepts in research and analysis. Acquaints students with the conceptual framework of the discipline and the basic processes of anthropological inquiry and application of knowledge. (Formerly ANTH 103)

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall

ANTH 101. Introductory Fieldwork in Archaeology

An introduction to basic methods for archeological excavation and site survey. The Involves a block of time in the field away from campus. Can be repeated up to two times for credit. (Class fee $75).

Units: 3-6, Repeatable up to: 12
Typically Offered: Spring

ANTH 101B. Advanced Fieldwork in Archaeology

Advanced methods and strategies for archeological excavation and site survey. The course will involve a commitment by students of a block of time in the field away from campus. Not open to students who have taken 101B-S.

Units: 6
Typically Offered: Spring

ANTH 102. Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology

A compendium of current thinking on language and culture from a variety of interdisciplinary perspectives. Examines the nature of language, language description, language and worldview, gendered speech, ethnicity and language, power and performance, verbal and nonverbal art, and associated theories and research methods.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Spring

ANTH 104. History and Theory of Anthropology

Prerequisite: ANTH 100. A history of the growth of anthropological thought through an analysis of the informational and explanatory powers of five major theoretical schools: Nineteenth-century Evolutionists, British Functionalists, Boasian Historical Particularists, Neo-Evolutionists/Marxists, and Cognitivists.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Spring

ANTH 105W. Applied Anthropology

Prerequisite: G.E Foundation and Breadth Area D, satisfactory completion (C or better) of ENGL 5B or ENGL 10 graduation requirement, to be taken no sooner than the term in which 60 units are completed. Examination and assessment of the use of anthropological data and concepts to address contemporary issues in education, health care, law, environmental planning, and social services. Students work on applied problems and write observations, plans, reports, and research documents geared to the needs of professionals, service providers, and particularly planners in modern institutional contexts. (Formerly ANTH 144W)

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
GE Area: M/I

ANTH 111. Ethnographic Fieldwork

An introduction to ethnographic field methods. Topics include the ethics of fieldwork, organizing data, and ethnographic writing. Students will conduct fieldwork on cultural locally. Can be repeated up to four times for credit.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to: 12

ANTH 111B. Intermediate Ethnographic Fieldwork

Prerequisite ANTH 111A. Students conduct an ethnographic field project under the direction of the instructor, employing participant observation. Involves field trips and weekend sessions. Involves a commitment of a block of time away from campus. Not open to students who have taken 111B-S.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Spring

ANTH 115. World Cultures

An examination of contemporary issues in anthropology based on evidence from both classical and modern ethnographies. Considers strategies of qualitative research and reporting, including ethics and the application of ethnographic research in modern societies. (Formerly ANTH 129T)

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Spring

ANTH 116W. Anthropology of Religion

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D, satisfactory completion (C or better) of the ENGL 5B or ENGL 10 graduation requirement, to be taken no sooner than the term in which 60 units are completed. Examines the patterned belief systems of the world's tribal, peasant, and sectarian societies. Stresses the role of religion in individual and group perception, cognition, ritual, and social organization. Topics include myth, magic, shamanism, mysticism, witchcraft, trance, hallucinogens, and cultism. Meets the upper-division writing skills requirement for graduation. G.E. Integration ID. (Formerly ANTH 150W)

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
GE Area: ID

ANTH 117. Anthropology of Health, Illness, and Healing

A cross-cultural examination of health practices and cultural assumptions on which they are based. Reviews ethnomedicine, ethnopsychiatry, and epidemiology in the health care systems of diverse cultures and of ethnic communities in pluralistic societies such as the United States. (Formerly ANTH 155)

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Spring

ANTH 118. Women: Culture and Biology

(ANTH 118 same as WS 170.) A cross-cultural and interdisciplinary analysis of the determinants of female statuses and circumstances. Examines theories, including biological and cultural determinism, which explain variations in the expression of sexuality, maturation, reproduction, and the life cycle. (Formerly ANTH 170)

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall

ANTH 119. Law and Culture

A comparative, holistic perspective on the evolution of law. Examines its natures and origins, the basic assumptions behind legal systems, their cross-cultural expression and effects, and the directionality of legal evolution. (Formerly ANTH 146)

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Spring

ANTH 120. Ethnic Relations and Cultures

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. The cultural and social origins of ethnicity, and its opportunities and problems for contemporary mass societies. Offers a critical review of major theories on ethnic politics, economics, and ideology in the light of cross-cultural evidence. G.E. Multicultural/International MI. (Formerly ANTH 172)

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Spring
GE Area: M/I

ANTH 123. Peoples and Cultures of Southeast Asia

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. An introductory survey of the cultural and historical adaptations of societies in Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam; and of Insular societies in Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines. Examines the major effects of culture contact between East and West. G.E. Multicultural/ International MI.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall
GE Area: M/I

ANTH 124. Peoples and Cultures of East Asia

Examines cultural pluralism. Considers cultural adaptations and change among minorities such as Moslems, Tibetans, and Mongolians in China, and ethnic groups of Japan and Korea. Outlines kinship, religion, organization, and technological factors in the Asiatic culture complex.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Spring

ANTH 125. Tradition and Change in China and Japan

(ANTH 125 same as HUM 140.) Examines the current aspirations and problems of the Chinese and Japanese in terms of their traditional cultures, and explains how their histories, values, world views, and intellectual traditions affect their lifestyles and their international relations today.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Spring
GE Area: M/I

ANTH 128. Environmental Anthropology

Examines the interactions between environment and human culture. Specific topics include theoretical and empirical trends in environmental anthropology, materialist and cognitive approaches to human-environment interactions, human culture in ecosystem perspective, religion and ecology, and contemporary environmental movements.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall

ANTH 130. Peoples and Cultures of the Southwest

A survey of Native American cultures of the Southwestern United States and Northwestern Mexico from their prehistoric origins to the present. Emphasis is placed on cultural continuity and change during the past 400 years of contact with western culture. (Formerly ANTH 127)

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall

ANTH 135. Muslim Communities in the Middle East

A survey of both rural and urban Muslim cultures and societies in the Middle East. Emphasizes the variety of lived experiences of Islam, gender and ethnic relations, and the impact of the West.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall

ANTH 138T. Topics in Cultural Anthropology

Prerequisite: varies with title. Special studies in the theory and practice of organized cooperation and conflict in nature and culture. (Formerly ANTH 149T)

Units: 1-6, Repeatable up to: 12
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ANTH 138T. Anthropology of Food and Agriculture

This course will explore human histories and relationships with food and farming, from hunter-gatherers to twenty-first century industrial agriculture. It will expose students to a number of frameworks, including political economy and ecology, food, taste, and identity, food and race, class, and gender, and food justice.

Units: 3

ANTH 140. Contemporary Archaeology

Examines archaeological theory (both historical and contemporary) as well as methods and techniques used by archaeologists to gather, analyze, and interpret data. (Formerly ANTH 106)

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall

ANTH 141. Prehistory of North America

Traces the development of Native American cultures from the Arctic to Mesoamerica, from the peopling of the continent to early historic times. Examines the archaeological evidence for the antiquity, spread, and variation of cultural adaptations to changing ecological conditions. (Formerly ANTH 131)

Units: 3

ANTH 142. Old World Prehistory

Examination of current knowledge of the prehistory of one area of the Old World. Chronologies, current findings, and important issues in theory method are reviewed. Consideration of these matters in relation to work in archaeology throughout the world and to work in closely related disciplines such as biology and geology. Some historic archaeology may also be included. Areas include Europe, Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and Australia. (Formerly ANTH 132)

Units: 3

ANTH 143. Archaeology and Prehistory of California

Origins and prehistory of the California Native Americans. Examination of the archaeological record, both statewide and regionally, with emphasis on adaptations to natural and social environments from 12,000 B.P. until early historic times. (Formerly ANTH 139T)

Units: 3

ANTH 145. Cultural Resources Management

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Provides an in-depth overview of historic and prehistoric cultural resources (districts, sites, buildings, and objects), their significance, and their management in the U.S. Topics include the legal context for CRM, identifying and evaluating cultural resources, assessing effects, treatment planning, and careers in CRM. G.E. Integration ID. (Formerly ANTH 139T)

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall
GE Area: ID

ANTH 159T. Topics in Archaeology

Prerequisite: varies with title. Special studies in archaeological methods, techniques, history and theory, or of prehistoric culture areas not covered in the regular curriculum. (Formerly ANTH 139T)

Units: 1-6, Repeatable up to: 12
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ANTH 161. Bio/Behavioral Evolution of the Human Species

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area B. Examines the evolution of the human species and its relationship to living and extinct primates. Explores the biological basis of human culture. Integrates evolutionary biology, geochronology, and anthropology in order to understand the bio/behavioral nature of modern man. G.E. Integration IB.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: IB

ANTH 162. Primates

An introduction to the study of primate biological and behavioral evolution. Explores sociobiological theory in order to explain the unity and diversity of social behavior in prosimians, monkeys, and apes.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall

ANTH 163. Human Variation

A cross-cultural examination of variations in human morphology, physiology, and biochemistry. Establishes the correlation between variations in human biology and variations in climate, culture, nutrition, and disease.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Fall

ANTH 164. Human Osteology

Introduces a range of analytic techniques for extracting information from human skeletal remains: sexing and aging, osteometry, odontometry, the examination and diagnosis of epigenetic traits and pathological lesion, and the statistical interpretation of skeletal data.

Units: 3
Typically Offered: Spring

ANTH 169T. Topics in Physical Anthropology

Special studies of the discovery and interpretation of information in physical anthropology, and of the application of this subdiscipline in legal, medical, and scientific research.

Units: 1-6, Repeatable up to: 12
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ANTH 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement --+ Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to: 6
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ANTH 192. Directed Readings

Supervised reading on a student-selected topic outside the regular curriculum, conducted through regular consultation with a faculty sponsor.

Units: 1-3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ANTH 193. Internships in Anthropology

Interns will work on a variety of tasks involving the analysis and curation of archaeological collections; design and curation of museum displays; the collection and analysis of physical anthropological data, including working with primates at local zoos; and ethnographic data collection. (Formerly ANTH 109)

Units: 1-6
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ANTH 194. Honors Thesis

Development of a student report or paper into a manuscript of professional and publishable quality. Requires approval by an Honors Committee of three faculty members. (Formerly ANTH 199)

Units: 1-3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

ANTH 195. Colloquium

Each spring semester students and department faculty will meet three times to discuss current problems in the field of anthropology. These three hour seminars will be led by a faculty member. Students will be expected to do all assigned readings and complete a paper on one of the topics discussed.

Units: 1
Typically Offered: Fall

ANTH 196. Seminar: Anthropological Futures

Culminating experience course in which students reflect on their experiences as anthropologists in training and assess the way they can carry their knowledge, skills and competencies forward.

Units: 2
Typically Offered: Spring

ANTH 197T. Current Topics in Anthropology

Subject matter of these courses combines topics from the various subfields of anthropology, providing the student with a more integrated view of the discipline.

Units: 1-6, Repeatable up to: 12
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring