Civil & Geomatics Engineering

CE 20. Engineering Mechanics: Statics

Prerequisites: MATH 77 or concurrently; PHYS 4A. Analysis of force systems, equilibrium problems, section properties; graphic, algebraic, and vector methods of problem solution. (CAN ENGR 8)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CE 29. Engineering Mechanics

Same as CE 29: Prerequisites: MATH 77 (or concurrently); PHYS 4A. Not open to mechanical or civil engineering majors. Study of fundamental priciples of statics and synamics by scalar and vector methods.

Units: 3

CE 85. Introduction to Civil Engineering

The civil engineering profession and its role in society; creative thinking and critical thinking as integral parts of the engineering decision process; engineering methods of analysis; problem solving; computer drafting; career opportunities. (Field trips required)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CE 110. Computer Applications in Civil Engineering

Prerequisites: MATH 76 or concurrently. Use and modification of existing programs. Creation of new programs. Use of structured language, spreadsheets, and numerical solutions CAD. Term projects.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CE 121. Mechanics of Materials

Prerequisite: CE 20. Applications of principles of mechanics to find stresses and deformations in machine and structural members.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CE 121L. Mechanics of Materials Laboratory

Prerequisite: CE 121 or concurrently. Application of principles and methods of testing to verify theory and determine limitations of principles of mechanics of materials. (3 lab hours)

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CE 123. Soil Engineering

Prerequisites: CE 121, CE 123L concurrently. Physical and mechanical properties of soil, lab and field testing, flow of water in soils including permeability and seepage, stree in soils, soil consolidation and settlement, earth pressure, slope stability, and introduction to foundation design.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CE 123L. Soil Engineering Laboratory

Prerequisite: CE 121L, CE 123 concurrently. Soil properties and testing, grain size distribution and soil classification, water content, specific gravity, permeability, compression, consolidation, and stress-strain relationships.

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CE 124. Concrete Laboratory

Prerequisite: CE 121L. Proportioning of concrete mixes; admixtures; workability tests; compressive, flexural, and tensile strength tests; reinforced concrete. (3 lab hours; field trips required)

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CE 125. Geotechnical Engineering Design

Prerequisites: CE 123, CE 123L. Theory and design of earth retaining walls, filtration and drawing systems, excavation and supporting systems, soil improvement and ground modification, geosynthetics design and applications, introduction to geoenvironmental engineering.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

CE 128. Civil Engineering Hydraulics

Prerequisite: CE 20 or concurrently. Fundamentals of civil engineering hydraulics with application to hydraulic structures. (3 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CE 129. Engineering Hydraulics Lab

Prerequisite: CE 128 or concurrently. Experiments and demonstrations in fluid properties, flow management, pipe flow, open channel flow, pumps, and hydraulic scour. (3 lab hours)

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CE 130. Theory of Structures

Prerequisite: CE 121. Trusses and frames analyzed by algebraic and graphic procedures; influence lines and live loading analysis; rigid frames analyzed by slope deflection and moment distribution. Introduction to matrix methods. FS

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CE 131. Intermediate Theory of Structures

Prerequisite: CE 130. Analysis of statically indeterminate beams, trusses, and frames; advanced topics in slope deflection and moment distribution; matrix methods.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CE 132. Reinforced Concrete Design

Prerequisite: CE 130. Design of reinforced concrete structural elements using the Ultimate Strength Design Method. Introduction to prestressed concrete. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours; field trips required)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CE 133. Design of Steel Structures

Prerequisite: CE 130. Design of steel members and systems for buildings. Design areas include: tension members, compression members, beams, beam-columns, connections and plate girders. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CE 134. Foundation Design

Prerequisites: CE 123, CE 123L, CE 132 or concurrently. Design and theory of spread and continuous wall, rectangular, cantilever and trapezoidal footings; earth pressures and cantilever as well as gravity retaining walls; pile foundations; pile driving; constructions considerations; load tests; subsurfave investigations; case hisotries; and computer-aided design of foundations. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CE 136. Design of Timber Structures

Prerequisite: CE 130. Design of timber members and systems for buildings. Design areas include: loads, properties of wood, tension members, beams, columns, beam-columns, connections, diaphragms, shear walls, and glued laminated arches.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CE 137. Seismic Analysis of Building Structures

Prerequisites: CE 130, ME 112. Effects of earthquakes on structures. Introduction to structural dynamics. Response of structures. Seismic provisions of building codes. Basic concepts in seismic -resistant design. Detailing for seismic-resistant construction. Term project. (Field trips required)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

CE 140. Hydrology

Prerequisites: CE 128 or concurrently. The hydrologic cycle, atmospheric conditions, precipitation, infiltration, ground water, soil moisture, evaporation, runoff, streamflow, hydrographs, flood routing, hydrologic statistical analysis; applications to water resources planning and management. (Field trips required)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

CE 141. Water Resources Engineering

Prerequisites: CE 128, CE 142 (or concurrently). Hydraulic design of water distribution, and sewerage. Computer-assisted pipe network analysis. Pump applications. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours; field trips required)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CE 142. Environmental Engineering

Prerequisites: CHEM 1A or CHEM 3A or concurrently; CE 128 or concurrently. Introduction to the principles and practices of environmental quality management, including water and air quality, waste management, and the environmental effects of engineered systems.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CE 142L. Environmental Quality Laboratory

Prerequisite: CE 142 or concurrently. Study and analysis of physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of air, water, and solid wastes. (Field trips required)

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CE 144. Design of Water Quality Control Processes

Prerequisites: CE 142 or permission of instructor. Analysis and design of selected physical, chemical, and biological facilities for water purification and wastewater treatment. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours) (Field trips required)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

CE 146. Urban Stormwater Management

Prerequisites: CE 128, CE 140 (or concurrently). Overview of stormwater management; introduction to urban stormwater drainage system design; stormwater management history and regulations; urban hydrology and hydraulic design; stormwater quality; receiving-water impacts; best management practices; computer assisted analysis and design. (Field trips may be required). (2 lecture, 3 lab hours).

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CE 150. Transportation Planning and Design

Prerequisite: GME 15, upper-division standing. Geometric design of land transportation facilities, primarily road/street systems. Traffic theory and analysis, including statistical analysis of traffic parameters. Freeway and intersection capacity. Simple transportation demand forcast. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CE 151. Pavement Design

Prerequisite: CE 123 or concurrently. Analysis of pavement structures. Factors affecting pavement performance. Structural design of flexible and rigid highway and airfield pavements. Pavement rehabilitation and repair.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CE 152. Trans Engr Mtlrs

Prerequisite: CE 123. Properties and durability of Portland cement concrete. Properties and testing of aggregates for asphalts concrete. Asphalt cements and asphalt concrete performance. Traditional and SUPERPAVE mix design and specification of asphalt concrete.

Units: 3

CE 153. Traffic Operations and Control

Prerequisite: CE 150. Transportation studies. Highway traffic characteristics. Highway system traffic analysis. Highway system capacity design. Traffic regulations and control.

Units: 3

CE 161. Construction Engineering I

Prerequisite: CE 130, permission of the instructor. Basics of civil engineering contracting, project funding, cash flow, equipment costs.

Units: 2
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CE 180A. Project Design

Prerequisites: Completion of Upper Division Writing Requirements, senior standing in civil engineering; permission of instructor. Civil engineering practice, ethical issues, project analysis and design. Student teams complete and orally defend proposal for a design project that includes several civil engineering specialties. Information gathering, time/resource management, and communication skills. (Formerly CE 191T).

Units: 2
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CE 180B. Senior Project

Prerequisites: CE 180A; approved project proposal; permission of instructor. Synthesis of previous coursework into a civil engineering design project under the supervision of a faculty member. Group projects except by special permission. (Formerly CE 180)

Units: 2
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CE 185. Civil Engineering Practice

Prerequisites: senior standing in civil engineering or permission of instructor. Practice of civil engineering; transition from student to professional engineer; engineering ethics. Business and public policy; administration fundamentals; leadership.

Units: 2
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CE 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CE 191T. Design of Wastewater Management Systems

Theory and practice of domestic wastewater treatment, including: Analysis of wastewater characteristics, flow rates, and constituent loadings; Porcess analysis and selection; Design of physical unit operations, chemical treatment processes, and biological treatment processes. (2 lecture hours, 2 activity hours) (Field trip required).

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

CE 191T. Civil Engineering Practice and Entrepreneurship

Civil engineering practice and entrepreneurship; transition from student to professional engineer; engineering ethics; business and public policy; contracting and law; economy and finance; leadership and management.

Units: 3

CE 193. Internship in Civil Engineering

Prerequisite: permission of adviser. Engineering practice in a consulting, industrial, or government work setting. Each cooperative internship period usually spans a summer-fall or spring-summer interval. This course cannot be used to meet graduation requirements. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 2-4

CE 205. Computing in Engineering Analysis

(ENGR 205 same as CE 205). Prerequisite: graduate status in engineering. Solution of engineering problems using digital computation. Modeling of engineering systems for numerical analysis at the graduate level. Solution of engineering problems using digital computation. Modeling of engineering systems for numerical analysis.

Units: 3

CE 206. Engineering Environmental Impact

Evaluation of environmental impacts due to engineering projects. The incorporation of environmental considerations into engineering design. Alternative solutions to engineering problems. Case histories of selected engineering projects.

Units: 3

CE 210. Research Methods in Civil Engineering

Development of research and skills, understanding, and application of the scientific method in engineering research, and development of individual research topic and proposal. Discussion of new developments in civil engineering science, oral presentations, and submittal of research papers.

Units: 3

CE 220. Advanced Foundation Engineering

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Design of cantilevered and anchored sheet-pile walls; axial- and lateral-loaded pile groups; drilled piers; pile driving stresses and wave equation analysis; beams on elastic foundations; footings on expansive and non-uniform soils and on rock; and case histories.

Units: 3

CE 223. Advanced Soil Mechanics

Prerequisites: CE 123, CE 123L, CE 125, and CE 134, or upon instructor's approval. The course covers in-depth discussion of soil aggregates and structures, pore water pressure, unsaturated soil mechanics, permeability and seepage, consolidation, and shear strength. Advanced soil testing (triaxial tests of shear strength and flexible-wall permeability tests) is conducted in class.

Units: 3

CE 225. Numerical Methods in Geotechnical Engineering

Prerequisites: CE 123 and CE 123L, CE 125, and CE 134. Covers introduction to programming, principles of finite element method, and principles of probabilistic methods in geotechnical engineering. Students apply various numerical methods in geotechnical applications (e.g., slope stability, seepage, consolidation) by developing numerical programs and using existing FEM software.

Units: 3

CE 230. Advanced Theory of Structures

Prerequisite: graduate standing in engineering or permission of instructor. Analysis of indeterminate structures by force (flexibility) methods and by displacement (stiffness) methods; Matrix methods suitable for digital computer solutions. Virtual work, real and complementary energy. Classical structural theorems. Introduction to the finite element method.

Units: 3

CE 232. Prestressed Concrete Design

Prerequisite: graduate standing in engineering or permission of instructor. Structural behavior and design of prestressed concrete elements and systems - continuous beams, frames, slabs. Partial prestress. (Field trip[s] required)

Units: 3

CE 233. Advanced Behavior and Design of Steel Structures

Prerequisite: graduate standing in engineering or permission of instructor. Material behavior and design of basic structural units; plate girders; connections; inelastic buckling; composite design; plastic design; P effect. Analysis and design of continuous structures, braced and unbraced frames; stability of steel structures. Critical study of the AISC specifications.

Units: 3

CE 234. Theory of Plates and Shells

Prerequisite: graduate standing in engineering or permission of instructor. Methods of calculating stresses and deformations in plates and shells used in engineering structures. Bending of circular and rectangular plates under various conditions. Membrane and flexural analysis of shells of revolution.

Units: 3

CE 235. Finite Element Analysis

Prerequisite: graduate standing in engineering or permission of instructor. Theoretical and conceptual bases for formulation of finite element representations in solid mechanics. Development of element stiffness matrices for plane stress and plane strain probelms, bending of plates and deformation of shells.

Units: 3

CE 236. Reinforced Masonry Theory and Design

Un-reinforced and reinforced masonry. Current and historic design and analysis methods of buildings and their components using clay, brick and concrete masonry. Masonry beams, columns, walls, shear wall, and retaining structures.

Units: 3

CE 237. Dynamics of Structures

Analysis of structural members and systems subject to dynamic loads. Basic theory for single-degree-of-freedom and multi-degree-of-freedom analytical models; free vibration, harmonic and transient excitation, response spectrum, LaGrange's equations, earthquake analysis.

Units: 3

CE 239. Advanced Reinforced Concrete Theory

Background and origin of modern reinforced concrete theory and procedures. Projection to anticipated future changes in design and construction practices. Application and extension of theory to include new and future construction materials such as high performance concrete and fiber reinforced polymers.

Units: 3

CE 240. Engineering Hydrology

Prerequisites: CE 128, CE 140. Analysis of the physical and stochastic processes governing the occurrence and movement of water in its natural environment. Applications to hydraulic engineering practice.

Units: 3

CE 241. Contaminants Fate and Transport Engineering

Introduction to contaminants migration in the environment, risk assessments and engineering remediation methods. Understanding factors controlling multimedia contaminants transport; qualifying transport rate; predicting and reducing resulting concentrations in air, water, and soil. Mathematical knowledge beyond the elementary level is required.

Units: 3

CE 242. Urban and Industrial Water Systems

Prerequisite: graduate standing in engineering or permission of instructor. A study of the interrelations of engineering, economic, legal, political, administrative, ecological, and social factors involved in the planning and management of water resources.

Units: 3

CE 242. Urban & Industrial Water Systems

This course introduces water management systems in urban and industrial settings. Water infrastructure master planning and the basics of water occurrence, use, tranport, quality, treatment, and disposal are included. (3 hours lecture of fully online, or hybrid of lecture and online).

Units: 3

CE 245. Geoenvironmental Engineering

Prerequisites: BIOL 10, CHEM 3A, CE 123, CE 128, CE 129, CE 142, or upon approval from the instructor. Topics covered in the course include basic soil physics, principles of groundwater flow, mass transport and transfer in soils, non-aqueous phase liquid in soils, geosynthetics, basic soil microbiology and biochemistry, environmental regulations, solid waste landfills, site contamination and treatment techniques.

Units: 3

CE 246A. Advanced Water Quality

Prerequisite: CE 142 or permission of instructor. Theory and practice of physical/chemical processes for controlling water quality, including chemical equilibrium and kinetics; mass transfer mechanisms; physical separation processes; adsorption, exchange, and membrane-based processes; disinfection.

Units: 3

CE 246B. Advanced Water Quality

Prerequisites: CE 142 or permission of instructor; CE 246A recommended. Theory and practice of biological processes for controlling water quality, including suspended growth systems; attached growth systems; ponds; land treatment. Also sludge treatment. Also sludge treatement processes, including biological stabilization thickening, and dewatering; sludge disposal.

Units: 3

CE 247. Solid Wastes Engineering

Planning and design of waste collection and disposal systems. Waste segregation and energy impact related to recovery and recycling practices. Environmental impact and institutional issues related to solid and hazardous waste systems.

Units: 3

CE 251. Advanced Boundary Law

Prerequisite: GME 151 or equivalent. Land and water boundary legal issues, both historical and new. Case investigations.

Units: 3

CE 261. Geoprocessing

Prerequisite: GME 173 or equivalent. Integration of computer technologies for gathering, analyzing, and displaying data associated with the earth's spatial features. Engineering design problems dependent on competing factors.

Units: 3

CE 271. Geodetic Systems Optimization

Prerequisite: GME 108 or equivalent. National geodetic networks; planimetric and vertical control systems; geodetic control densification; network optimization criteria and methodology.

Units: 3

CE 275. Satellite Surveying

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Discussion of GPS orbital theory, data collection and processing algorithms, network adjustments, project design and optimization techniques. Review of current research trends and applications. (Field trips required)

Units: 3

CE 276. GPS Theory and Application

Operational theory of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). Applications to engineering practice.

Units: 3

CE 280. Geomatics Engineering Seminar

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Current California State University, Fresno surveying engineering research presented and discussed by faculty and graduate students. Oral presentation and written report documenting ongoing research activities required.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 3 units

CE 283. Digital Remote Sensing

Prerequisite: GME 140 or equivalent. Quantitative approach in remote sensing; digital image characteristics, error correction, registration; geometric and radiometric image enhancement; image classi fication; system design; remote sensing and GIS.

Units: 3

CE 285. Advanced Analytical Photogrammetry

Prerequisite: GME 125 or equivalent. Mathematical models in photogrammetry; bundle block adjustment, self-calibration; close-range photogrammetry; real time photogrammetry and data snooping. System design; hardware and software considerations in photogrammetry.

Units: 3

CE 286. Geographic Information Systems Design

Prerequisite: GME 173 or equivalent. Data structures and algorithms, databases for GIS, error modeling and data uncertainty, visualization, data exchange and standards, the multipurpose cadaster, advanced analysis techniques.

Units: 3

CE 290. Independent Study

Prerequisite: graduate status in engineering. See Academic Placement -- Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

CE 291T. Topics in Engineering

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Investigation of selected engineering topics. May be offered with a lab. (Formerly ENGR 291T)

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

CE 291T. Transportation Planning

This course covers both state-of-practice as well as state-of-the-art in transportation planning. While trip-based models and the traditional four-step transportation planning model will be discussed as the state-of-practice, activity-based models and the FHWA's Transportation Analysis and Simulation System (TRANSIMS) will cover the state-of-the-art in transportation planning. The course includes critique and assessment of both paradigms. In addition to the mathematical and theoretical foundation, students will learn about the economic, social, and environmental aspects of transportation planning and will gain hands-on experience running both models using software packages.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

CE 291T. Fate and Transport of Contaminants in the Environment

The course covers basic principles of chemical behavior in the environment. The goals are: 1) to understand the physical properties that govern the behavior , fate and transport of contaminants released into the environment (air, surface and subsurface water); 2) to apply the principles and theories of fate and transport of contaminants to work on practical, quantitative problems dealing with environmental chemicals. Topics include mass balance, chemical equilibria and kinetics, environmental transport and advanced topics such as surface/subsurface water transport and date, and atmospheric transport of pollutants.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

CE 298. Project

Prerequisite: graduate status in engineering. Independent investigation of advanced character such as analysis and/or design of special engineering systems or projects; critical review of state of the art of special topics, as the culminating requirement for the master's degree. Abstract required. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 3

CE 298C. Project Continuation

Pre-requisite: Project CE 298. For continuous enrollment while completing the project. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

CE 299. Thesis

Prerequisite: See [-LINK-]. Preparation, completion, and submission of an acceptable thesis for master's degree. Approved for SP grading.

Units: 2-6

CE 299C. Thesis Continuation

Pre-requisite: Thesis CE 298. For continuous enrollment while completing the thesis. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

GME 1. Introduction to Geomatics Engineering

An introduction to geomatics engineering philosophical thought; geomatics engineering profession and career opportunities; professional ethics and safety; creative and critical thinking applied to the geomatics engineering decision-making process. (Formerly SE 1)

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Fall

GME 5. Critical Reasoning

Fundamentals of analysis and evaluation in the context of technology. Evaluating the viewpoints of experts. Patterns of deductive and inductive arguments. Common fallacies of reasoning. G.E. Foundation A3. (Formerly S E 5)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: A3

GME 15. Engineering Surveying

Prerequisite: MATH 5. Principles of surveying measurements for distance, direction, elevation, topographic and planimetric mapping, horizontal curves, vertical curves, earthwork and engineering applications. (Formerly SE 15)

Units: 2
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

GME 15L. Engineering Surveying Laboratory

Prerequisite: GME 15 or concurrently. Field practice in geomatics measurement, construction stakeout, and curve alignment problems. (3 lab hours; field trips required) (Formerly S E 15L)

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

GME 16. Municipal Surveying

Prerequisites: GME 15. Instrumentation; automated electronic survey data collection; land survey; introduction to photogrammetry, GPS, GIS, and control surveys. Astronomy for azimuth applications.

Units: 2
Course Typically Offered: Spring

GME 16L. Municipal Surveying Laboratory

Prerequisite: GME 16 or concurrently. Field and office practice in instrumentation: Automated electronic survey data collection; land survey, photogrammetry, GPS, GIS, and control surveys. Astronomy for azimuth applications. (3 lab hours; field trips required)

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Spring

GME 23L. Optics and Waves

Visual optics, prisms, lenses, and collimated light, electromagnetic spectrum and waves, wave properties and atmospheric interactions, optical and electromagnetic imaging systems. GPS, GIS, remote sensing, photogrammetric and EDM applications. (3 lab hours; field trips required)

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Fall

GME 34. Adjustment Computations

Prerequisites: GME 15, GME 61, MATH 76. Error theory, adjustment of simple survey networks, and matrix methods; digital computer solutions of geomatics computation and adjustment problems. (Formerly SE 34)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

GME 40. Route and Construction Surveying

Prerequisites: GME 15, GME 15L or permission of instructor. Computations and theory covering surveys for highway, irrigation, rail, pipeline, and other transportation alignment projects. Includes computer solutions and applications. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours; field trips required) (Formerly SE 40)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

GME 50. Land Surveying

Prerequisite: GME 15. The United States Public Land Survey System with special emphasis on California; introduction to the California Land Surveyors Act, Certified, A.L.T.A. and mortgage surveys; sectionalized land subdivision, corner restoration, resurveys, evidence, and descriptions. (Field trips required) (Formerly SE 50)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

GME 61. Microcomputers in Engineering

Prerequisite: GME 15 or concurrently. Microcomputer operating systems; introduction to high level computer languages, file processing, program documentation, testing, and debugging. (Formerly S E 61)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

GME 66. Computer-Aided Mapping

Preparing transportation alignment, topographic, property boundary, environmental, cross section, structural and GIS maps and plans. Civil and Geomatics Engineering and Construction applications. Includes comprehensive computer mapping design experience.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

GME 73. Geomatics

Introduction to Geographic and Land Information Systems; software and hardware issues; practical exercises. (Formerly S E 73)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

GME 102. Geodetic Surveying

Prerequisites: GME 16, GME 34. Horizontal and vertical geodetic networks for deformation, industrial tooling and local area applications; theory and application of State Plane Coordinate systems. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours; field trips required) (Formerly SE 101)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

GME 108. Geodesy

Prerequisites: MATH 77, PHYS 4A, PHYS 4AL, GME 34 or concurrently. Size and shape of the earth; three-dimensional coordinate systems; computations on the spheroid; reduction to plane coordinates; introduction to differential equations, gravity modeling and gravity measurements. (Formerly SE 108)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

GME 114. GPS Navigation

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Theory and concepts of navigation systems emphasizing real-time GPS. Design of air, sea, and land navigation applications, including automatic vehicle location and navigation (AVLN). (2 lecture, 3 lab hours; field trips required) (Formerly SE 114)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

GME 123. Stereo-Photogrammetry

Prerequisites: GME 15, GME 34 or concurrently. Imaging systems; image quality. Theory of stereo-photogrammetry; orientation of stereo-model. Design and operating principles of stereoplotters. Photogrammetric mapping; orthophoto mapping. Project planning. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours; field trips required) (Formerly SE 123)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

GME 125. Analytical Photogrammetry

Prerequisites: GME 123, GME 135. Introduction to analytical photogrammetry; strip and block aerial triangulation. Design and operating principles of analytical plotters. Introduction to soft-copy photogrammetry. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours; field trips required) (Formerly SE 125)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

GME 126. Digital Mapping

Prerequisites: GME 123, GME 173 or concurrently. Design of data input, editing, display and processing mechanisms for digital mapping applications; hardware considerations and software design for DTM applications. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours; field trips required)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

GME 135. Advanced Adjustment Computations

Prerequisites: GME 34, MATH 77. Statistics, propagation of errors, advanced theory of least squares optimization algorithms. Computer programming for complex surveying and photogrammetry adjustment applications. Project design. (Formerly S E 135)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

GME 143. Satellite Geodesy

Prerequisites: GME 102, GME 108, GME 135 or concurrently. Motion of a satellite, orbit geometry and perturbations; time measuring systems; global geodesy model; reduction and adjustment of GPS and other satellite observation data; differential equations of orbit relaxation; GPS network optimization; data transformation. (Field trips required) (Formerly SE 143)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

GME 145. Geopositioning

Prerequisites: GME 102, GME 108, GME 135. Design of planning, data collection, data processing and network adjustment applications; kinematic and real-time GPS applications; case studies. (Field trips required)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

GME 151. Boundary Control and Legal Principles

Prerequisite: GME 50 or permission of instructor. Legal principles that control the boundary location of real property. (Formerly S E 151)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

GME 152. Real Property Descriptions

Prerequisite: GME 151 or permission of instructor. Theory and practice of real property descriptions and recording systems; metes and bounds, United States Public Land Survey System, lot and block and other styles investigated; practical exercises and case studies. (Field trips required) (Formerly SE 153)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

GME 153. Boundary Survey Design

Prerequisite: GME 151 or permission of instructor. Design of evidence gathering, resurvey, retracement, and analysis techniques for complex United States Public Land Survey System, metes and bounds, riparian, mineral, land grant and fraudulent surveys; case studies. (Field trips required) (Formerly SE 153)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

GME 159. Subdivision Design

Prerequisites: GME 40, GME 151. Subdivision map act, local subdivision regulations, title search, zoning study. Tentative and final subdivision layout, map drafting, computerized subdivision design, and drafting; environmental impact study. Field trips required. (Formerly S E 159)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

GME 161. Data Interface Design

Prerequisites: GME 16, GME 135, Development and design of data collector software; file system generation, manipulation and transfer; microcomputer interface to data collector, electronic total station, digitizer, stereo/mono comparator and stereo-plotters. (Field trips required) (Formerly SE 161).

Units: 3

GME 173. Introduction to GIS

Prerequisites: GME 15 and GME 66 or permission of instructor. Data quality and accuracy, privacy, ethics, institutional, governmental and technological issues associated with GIS; hardware and software considerations for geodetically controlled cadastral, resource and environmental GIS applications; existing system case studies. (Field trips required) (Formerly SE 173)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

GME 174. GIS Applications

Prerequisite: GME 173. Use of available GIS. Applications software; spatial analysis, simulation modeling and system evaluation; practical applications to specific GIS scenarios; creation, manipulations, maintenance and analysis of geodetic, cadastral, administrative resource and environmental overlays. Field trips required. (Formerly S E 174)

Units: 3

GME 175. GIS Design

Prerequisite: GME 173. Application of data quality, accuracy, ethics and liability issues to the design of integrated Geographic Information Systems; integrated data structure, algorithm, and database considerations; major design team GIS development project required. Field trips required. (Formerly S E 175)

Units: 3

GME 180. Senior Project

Prerequisites: GME 181or concurrently. UDWE or a "W" course or concurrently. Study of a problem under supervision of a faculty member; final typewritten report required. Individual project except by special permission. GME 180 and GME 181 satisfy the senior major requirement for the B.S. in Geomatics Engineering. (Field trips required) (Formerly SE 181)

Units: 2
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

GME 181. Project Design

Prerequisite: GME 108, GME 123, GME 135, GME 151, GME 173. Design of control, boundary location, and photogrammetric systems. Evaluation of design requirements, economic, and social considerations. Case Studies. Student presentations. GME 180 and GME 181 satisfy the senior major requirement for the B.S. in Geomatics Engineering. (Field trips required) (Formerly SE 181)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

GME 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement - [-LINK-]. Approved for SP grading. (Formerly S E 190)

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

GME 193. Internship in Geomatics Engineering

Prerequisite: permission of adviser. Engineering practice in a consulting, industrial, professional, or government work setting. A report will be required of the student at the termination of each implemented experience. This course cannot be uses to meed graduation requirements CR/NC grading only. (Formerly SE 193)

Units: 2-4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring