Learning and Teaching

Center for the Scholarly Advancement of Learning and Teaching (CSALT)

Technology Innovations for Learning and Teaching (TILT)

Contact Information

Asao Inoue, Ph.D.
Special Assistant to the Provost for Writing Across the Curriculum

Location: Harold H. Haak Center, Library 1110

Phone: 559-278-2214
Email: ainoue@csufresno.edu

Mailing Address:

WAC Program
5200 N. Barton, ML 54
California State University, Fresno
Fresno, CA 93740


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Spring 2013 Office Hours

Mon 3:30-5:45 PM
Tue 2-4 PM
Wed 11 AM-2 PM
Thur 11 AM-2 PM

 

Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC)

Welcome!

Students working on a writing assignment

This site offers Fresno State faculty information and resources on the Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) program at Fresno State. The site will be updated often, so check back for news and upcoming events, announcements, and new resources. If you have any feedback on the site, please send it to Asao B. Inoue.

 

WAC Mission

The mission of the Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) program at Fresno State is primarily to offer guidance and direction to faculty who use writing in their courses, and who wish to help students improve their writing practices.

WAC Purpose

The purpose of the WAC program is to:

  • Support faculty and departments in their efforts to use writing productively and meaningfully in their courses and programs;
  • Support faculty and departments in their efforts to assess writing in meaningful, fair, valid, and reliable ways, whether the contexts and purposes for that assessment be programmatic or at the classroom level; and
  • Conduct WAC-related research that will inform Fresno State faculty about the writing practices of students and/or teaching practices of Fresno State faculty, in order to help improve teaching and student writing practices.

WAC Research Spotlight

From Paul Kei Matsuda's "Let's Face it: Language Issues and the Writing Program Administrator" in WPA: Writing Program Adminstration (36.1, 2012): 

the field of rhetoric and composition has dismissed language
pedagogy based on the assumption of linguistic homogeneity—an assumption that is no longer tenable. Given the obvious language learning needs of some second language writers, and given the mounting evidence suggesting the efficacy of grammar feedback that raises metalinguistic awareness, all writing teachers need to learn how to provide effective metalinguistic feedback. Yet, there is no guarantee that students will be able to acquire any particular language features based on the feedback—at least in the immediate future. To avoid punishing students for what teachers are not able to teach, grading criteria need to be revised thoroughly.(157)